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Full text of "S. F. News Letter (1888)"

200? 1004603 D 

California State Library V *T / 



/a© 8 —, '"*%■ 

Whm.from whom, and how this wlame un, obtained, 

„.;„: the price paid, if any, may be found oppose 

ike above number in the Register of Books, 

which is always open to inspection. 

Extract from the Political Code. 

, vmn Rooks may be taken from the Library 

„ ^r d b/otber State officers at any time 

8 «■ 2298 The Controller, if notified by the Librarian 

the Librarian. 

R«n '299 Every person who injures or falls to return 
aJy'Vok taken isVble to the Librarian ,n three times 
the value thereof. 

the Rules.] 

,<®-The foregoing Regulations will be stnctK^nforoed^* 



C 



I 





FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 3HURCH. 
Second Street, San Jose, Cal. 



ra, xxxv in 



t*1 rl ** N0,t ««> 



Number 29. 



News ps^rBR 

CTalifornia Aftbcrii*er. 



DtVOTTO TO IhI LlAl'SQ IfiTtofSTt OF Cai 



i aso thc Pacific Coa»t. 

i IOI.H K M u: 

Su&fcrfjilfoM, 



S^JV FRANCISCO, SATVRDAY. JANUARY 7, 1S8S. 



THE BUSINESS OFFICES of the S. I". NEWS 
LETTER have been removed to Market nml Fourth Sts. 
Building, where orders far advertisements and subscrip- 
tions a HI be received and communications should be ad- 
i dressed. 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



The Norcross development has exerted a beneficial influence on 
Lbe market for Comstoci shares, and a much belter feeling prevails 
on tin* street. The extent of ore already uncovered in this mine 
places it in rank of importance next to the Bonanza mine itself. The 
discovery of a similar ore body some years ago, would have resulted 
in a more marked advance in prices, and much excitement would 
have prevailed. Now, however, nothing seems bo exert n leverage 
sufficient t" lift the market out of the rut in which it is dragging. 
The fact that the public are still heavily loaded with stuck is unfa- 
vorable to the prospect for any lengthened upheaval in prices, and 
even the advance in Norcross must be attributed in a great measure 
to filling of "* shorts.* 1 A heavy amount of this stock was sold short 
at rates ranging from $5 to $7J<i, and most of it has been taken in at 
figures which Lave resulted in a serious loss to the bear element. 
Holders, as a rule, are not to be tempted into selling at present 
prices, believing that much higher prices will yet be touched. There 
\< not, however, much margin business being done, the brokers being 
IS a rule unable to extend the necessary financial assistaneea, and 
the banks so far exhibiting no particular desire to branch out in this 
line of business. It is rumored, however, that within a few weeks 
one or more of the institutions, which used to loan on stocks in the 
past, will again !»• prepared to accommodate borrowers on this class of 
seourity. The (.'hollar mill is now running to its fullest capacity, but 
returns of the workings have not yet been made public. Iti'ssaid 
thai the ore will average at least $20 to the ton. There is a scarcity 
of mills in the vicinity of the lode, and several ore-producing mines 
are unable to clear their overloaded dumps. The Occidental is in this 
Condition, and so is the Justice; both have ore on hand ready for 
working, but find it impossible to obtain a mill. The best thing the 
Alta management could do with their new mill is to let it out to peo- 
ple who have some use for it. They have none. The latest discovery 
made by these intelligent miners is that their ore requires roasting, 
which i's immediately followed by the start ling announcement that the 
concentrators will average $1,200 to the ton. The price of Alta has 
been variously manipulated during the week at a fifty-cent limit. 
This is done with intent to enthuse shareholders into paying up on 
the assessment which is now delinquent. SO far only $13,030 has 
been paid in, out of a levy of $50,000. Stockholders "in this mine 
should organize and investigate the management. The transaction 
in mill-building in particular should be sifted for bottom facts, which, 
if all accounts are true, would reveal a rather peculiar system of 
business. From the inside pointers which are being industriously 
disseminated in reference to the merits of Lady Washington, it is 
not unlikely that an assessment will soon be levied. The total 
amount of bullion shipped from Con. Virginia for the month up to 
date is $277,000. 

The leading Tuscarora mines have been stronger during the week, 
and trading in the shares has been active. The last shipment from 
the North Belle Isle amounted to $51 080, the result of a run on 85 1-10 
tons of ore. The pulp assays averaged for the week $29fl per ton. The 
work of development is being rapidly driven ahead in Nevada Queen 
and the Commonwealth, both of which are looking better, as every 
foot of ground is gained. Prospecting is in active progress in Belle 
Isle and Navajo. The formation encountered lately is most promis- 
ing, especially in the latter. 

The Australian mines seem to fare better in London than our Cali- 
fornia properties. Scarcely a week passes without the appearance of 
one or more new schemes for the investment of capital. The Mexi- 
can mines seem also to be holding their own. and considerable inter- 
est is being taken in the development of the vast mineral re- 
sources of that country. There are a number of as good mines in 
California as can be found in any other quarter of the globe, which 
are lying lifeless through lack of sufficient capital to develop their 
hidden wealth— great bonanzas of metallic wealth, only awaiting the 
golden key to unlock the vaults which contain the treasure. The 
trouble with us seems to be in a lack of manipulators. Only one or 
two capable and reliable men are engaged in the business, and they 
are fully occupied at present with affairs on hand. The small fry 
who are pleased to term themselves operators have been a curse to 
the State. Incapable and impecunious, they have never hesitated to 
undertake the most contemptible schemes, provided an opportunity 
offered for a petty steal, which provided the veneer necessary to per- 
mit an association with gentlemen in the European centers. These 
swindlers are pretty well weeded out; their little game can only be 
worked once, then it ends, and the profits realized are soon swept 
away in a vain attempt to restore confidence. Her mines will event- 



ually eaUbllah a reputation for California abroad, and the d 
engendered by the misconduct of a few unprincipled persons will 

■ > disappear under the I the future. 

\ movement i- on fool I t nlon 

in this city, with the object En view ol fostering and pro lectin 
tinning Interests of California, Hie p] me which merits the 

heartj co operation of all pei nnected with this important In 

• lii-try. The set-back which mining baa eived, 

through an adverse and short sighted legislation, renders it Imperative 
that something should be done to restore the buslne i to Ha former 
prosperit] The pn been i 

rate, through the closing down of valuable properties, on which mil- 
lion- have been spent in development Why adi ectable 

miner should lie driven tr bis legitimate occupation, in which be 

has Invested his capital, to accommodate a few olod-hoppei 
pussle to people who recognize the fact that, to this da-- in particular, 
California Is largely Indebted for her present prosperity. The miner 
baa a pnor claim on the sympathies ol our people, and he should be 
protected in hta rights at all hazards. Bring on the Union, and let 
sbckeiis again Bow merrily through the land. Gold Is king In Cali- 
fornia. 

1 1 i- reported that Hamilton, who, assisted by the notorious i Irani , 

of London, involved some unfortunate Bugllsh Investors In the Union 

Gold.nl Calaveras, is now engaged hi trying to folflt BOme property 
In Angel's camp on the Boston people. Persons with ordinary dis* 
cretion will do well to post themselves on the history of the union 
Gold before they take any stock in the new Calaveras scheme. < Ine 
thing is certain, that Boston may prove an easier Meld for Hamilton 
to operate In than London. He will find some difficulty in working 
that channel successfully s second time. 

We bear from Amador County that the Kennedy mine is looking 
remarkably well, but there is not a particle of truth in the report 
that the stockholders have ordered Taylor A Sous to prepare and pre- 
sent to the San Francisco President and Trustees a suitable tr-h- 
monial in recognition of their valuable services and good manage- 
ment of the property. The stockholders are apparently fully satis- 
fied on one point, and that is that in the near future they will be 
called upon to pan out a large Varney dividend. The proposed 
change in the superintendency of this mine will prove a serious mis- 
take. 

We would ask Professor Whitney if it is not a fact that during his 
connection with the Geological Survey he was given a quantity of rich 
gold specimens for the State, by persons in Grass Valley and else- 
where. If so, what has become of them, and why were they not 
tmned into the State, according to theintention of the donors? 

R, 11. Catherwood, the New York capitalist, and principal owner in 
the Palmetto Mines, of Nevada, is in this city. He will shortly pro- 
ceed to the mines to perfect arrangements for an early resumption of 
work on these valuable properties. 

The Candelaria Mill is running at its full capacity of 25 stamps on 
ore from the Georgene Mine, with good results. 

Professor Price left for Arizona during the week on professional 
business. 

The First National Bank was established in 1S70, and has been a 
prosperous institution from the beginning. Its dividends thus far 
amount to oner $2,300,000. Mr. Daniel Callaghan has been its Presi- 
dent for the past six years. As lie intends to retire from active busi- 
ness and take a trip to the East and Europe, he will resign the posi- 
tion at the next meeting of the Hoard of Directors. We understand 
Mr. S. G. Murphy, the popular Cashier of the Pacific Bank, will be 
chosen to fill the President's chair, which we have no doubt he will 
do with ability. 

Mr. J. J. Case, a millionaire agricultural impliment manufac- 
turer, who is perhaps best known as the owner of the famous trotter, 
Jay Eye See, has just purchased from ex-Senator De Long the lower 
part of the Novata ranch, Marin county, amounting in extent to 
four thousand five hundred acres. The purchase price is reported at 
$230,000. It is also said that the purchaser has a Chicago syndicate 
associated with him, and that it is intended to establish a large stock 
farm on the land, and also to build a town. 

The suspension of Messrs. Geo. W. Meade & Co. was one of those 
unfortunate incidents to which mercantile life is always liable. The 
firm is not only solvent, but an examination of its books shows that 
it has assets to the extent of three times its liabilities, and its embar- 
rassment is simply due to its temporary lack of ready money. The 
firm has asked for an extension of time, and the matter will probably 
be arranged on that basis. The creditors will not lose anything. 



M. J. Flavin, proprietor of a swimming establishment at North 
Beach, has sued H. P. Gregorv & Co. to recover $10,000 damages. 
The plaintiff claims that the defendants agreed to put an engine into 
the baths which would not only pump the water in, but would sup- 
ply steam to heat the water in the baths. This, he claimed, was not 
done, and his establishment was injured in consequence. 

The "News Letter" is glad to be able to announce that General 
Walter Turnbull returned from his European trip on Saturday last 
in the best of health and spirits. The General was an eye-witness of 
the Trafalgar Square riots, and was in France during the Presidential 
crisis, so that he had an opportunity to study foreign Governmental 
institutions at the time they were being thoroughly tested. 



OLD BARS— 880 fine, par.— Refined Silver— 24J^@25 per cent. 
Mexican Dollars, 70)^0. @77c. 
'Price of Money here, 6@10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 
open market, %@1 per month. Demand moderate. On Bond 
Security, 5 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand moderate. 
•Exchange on New York, par; London Bankers, 49%d. Paris 
sight, 5.10@5.12>£ fr. per dollar. Telegrams on New York, 10c. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Jan. 6.— U. 
S.Bonds,4,125K.b;4>^ I 107M,b. Sterling Exchange, 484@487. West- 
ern Union, 77%. 

London, January 6, 1887— Consols 102 5-16@103. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



TO PASS THE TIME AWAY. 
"In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 

A stately pleasure dome decree." 

And such a pleasure dome as it ia, with stately halls and corridors, 
courts and verandahs, surrounded by marvelous gardens, with wind- 
ing walks and inviting retreats, with'in sight and sound of the ocean ! 
Its votaries, those seeking for pleasure, relaxation or health, betake 
themselves to the depot, and whirling along in a rapid railroad train, 
soon find themselves at Del Monte. I've been there. It's lots of 
fun — the people I mean. Human nature is always amusing, espe- 
cially when it's on its best behavior, and is trying to act as if it really 
enjoyed it. Few of us do, though there is a certain satisfaction of 
doing just as we like, regardless of cost, as they say at a forced sale. 
No one wants to be good all the time. To those of us whose chief 
source of amusement, entertainment and satisfaction are our emo- 
tions, it's rather exhilarating to do wrong, if only for the further sen- 
sations of being sorry and then forgiven. But when people really 
are trying to make "the most of themselves, to impress others, and 
what is often infinitely more difficult, to feel assured in their own 
inner consciousness that everything is lovely, it's immensely funny 
to the disinterested spectator. I fancy Mepnistopheles must often 
have laughed in his sleeve— when he wasn't leering in public. 

But to the people, what a boon this favorite hostelry has been! 
Even when it burned to the ground, its beneficent influence con- 
tinued — such an opportunity for habitation in social importance as 
it gave a multitude of men and women, particularly women. Had 
the house had three times its capacity, itwould not have been able to 
contain all those, the burden of whose lament continued to be: 
•' Really, I don't know where we shall spend the Summer. The burn- 
ing of Del Monte has disarranged all our plans. We had engaged 
our rooms for the season. Now, of course it is too late to apply any- 
where else; they're all full, and so we shall have to stay at home 
this year." Then those who were burned out by the tire are now able 
to account for an absence of jewels from their personal adornment 
by bemoaning the fact that the rich accumulation of years disap- 
peared on that eventful night. Of a truth, many elaborate wardrobes 
and lustrous gems have risen, Phrcnix-like, from the flames. Of 
course a great many of those whose Summer plans so disastrously 
ended in smoke had every intention of going down for the New Year 
festivities; but their unlucky star being in the ascendant, this time 
the rooms were already engaged. 

'Twould be an impossible task even to attempt a mere mention of 
the scenes and the affairs that have here taken place. Society girls 
are the same everywhere; society matrons perhaps grow more lively 
at Monterey than they are at home, and their liege lords ; well, they 
have the party made up to suit their own tastes. In several instances 
it has happened that the friend ot the wife has been court jester for 
the husband— helped amuse him, you know. 

More than one matrimonial fish has been hooked and landed here. 
Why, not to be too indefinite, I myself know a case in point. The 
girl was intensely disagreeable. At least she was so regarded by those 
having the honor of her acquaintance. I will designate myself as an 
exception. I found her an interesting study. She was arrogant, 
supercilious, and repelled by look, gesture and voice. She was un- 
mistakably clever. She knew it, and took care that you should know 
it too. Men couldn't endure her dogmatic, old-maidish style, though 
she was young and rather good-looking. She went to Monterey. By 
a conjunction of the planets, it happened that young Mr. Susceptible 
was there too, suffering from the chagrin of having been jilted; and 
chaffing under the mortification of having it the subject of conversa- 
tion. Lo, and behold 1 My friend caught him on the rebound; or, 
as Lena Despard has taught me to say, " While the man was on the 
hop." And wasn't she elated over her success ! That's merely one 
case. I know she blesses Monterey. 

I can overlook, in young people, any amount of spooning. It's 
perfectly ridiculous, to be sure; but it's legitimate as well. It is the 
bridal couples that cause me fatigue. Didn't I once detect a pair of 
such turtle doves entering the dining-room hand in hand — the dining- 
room of all places! But then they are so happy, poor things, and 
perhaps they will all too soon lose their delight in each other. People 
have grown tired of each other's society; in fact, they do every day. 
When I was at Del Monte a wealthy, newly-married granger had 
brought his bride to our table. She was larger than he by several 
hands. I must use the proper nomenclature, for actually she stepped 
off with a bovine grace, and the eyes of her husband dwelt admiringly 
upon her, as if she had been one of his own prize cattle. The lady 
who sat at my right declared, and none too privately, that it made 
her sick to see them ladling sugar into their tea and pouring such 
sweet glances into each other's eyes. But she was over-fastidious, 
especially as she insisted that it took away her appetite to see the 
bride eat soup from the end of her spoon, while her little finger was 
tangent at right angles to her hand. I reasoned with this critical 
friend, but to no avail. She would not enter the dining-room while 
the rustics were feeding themselves. 

If ever there be any drawback to my enjoyment at a resort, it in- 
creases in the -ratio that the place becomes renowned as a sanitarium. 
1 do not enjoy being surrounded by invalids. They will persist in 
giving you the whole history of their malady. They rival each other 
m bidding for sympathy and attention. They will tell you exactly 
how they passed their night. Sick people have such a distressing 
way of going into detail; even every wheeze of their cough is num- 
bered. For my part, I rather dread those who overwhelm one on 
short acquaintance with their confidence. I must confess to a lack of 
interest in genealogies of family or of disease. I remember one bright 
young mother, who had a cherubic child whom everybody persisted 
in admiring as " the loveliest little girl," when the distracted mother 
would exclaim : " He's not a girl ; he's a boy." " If he's a boy, why, 
in the name ot common sense, don't you dress him like a boy ! " ex- 
claimed an old lady, who looked like an English dowager, her cap 
strings fluttering an emphasis to her words. " Take off that long 
white dress and put him in kilts ! " which advice the mother was fain 
to follow. This little fellow— who, by the way, possessed a geo- 
graphical name, had had his life miraculously preserved by chewing- 
gum. I have forgotten the circumstances; but I remember that, 



after a harrowing recital of how her baby lav rigid, with set jaws and 
staring at Death, his muscles were brought into play by chewing- 
gum, which his little cousin kindly "started" forliim. It is truly 
marvelous what a fund of information, particularly of a medical na- 
ture, can be acquired by a receptive mind. I took it all in. 

But perhaps the richest lead to open up with an observation pick, 
and which prospects excellent ore, is a party of tourists. I recall one 
in particular— not that I ever exchanged "more than a dozen words 
with any of its members ; but one evening I passed the parlor in time 
to see the remains of a confusion. True to my instinct, being nat- 
urally of an inquiring turn of mind, I asked what had happened. 
"One of the tourists has j»st had a fit. Her husband took her away !" 
"But it's nothing for her to have 'em!'" volunteered another lady. 
She had forty on the cars coming out." Imagine it! Forty fits on 
the overland journey! How many would that make a day? "Oue for 
every meal, and some between. Fancy ! 

One of the mementoes of Monterey are the shells — abalone, muscle 
or clam shells polished to a transcendent degree. These always take 
with the tourists. One economical spirit (many of the excursionists 
have saving souls) thought he could polish shells for himself. His 
experiments with shells, muriatic acid, a stationary washstand and 
the plumbing, which combined in a chemical, but to him a surprising, 
manner, cost him, after he had paid for repairs, rather more than if 
he had bought the shellman's stock several times over. But the best 
thing in connection with tourists which ever happened might be dis- 
credited were not the witnesses of undoubted veracity. Seated around 
the blazing fire in the great entrance hall, one evening, were a party 
of Eastern visitors. It was past train time, and the new arrivals were 
momently expected. And by the way, it is something of an ordeal 
to enter, travel- stained and fatigued, into a blaze of light, and be 
stared at by those who have had a comfortable dinner, while the 
travelers are well-nigh famished, and know that they are not making 
a good appearance. Some guests arrive; the Eastern party are in- 
terested. They whisper: " Those are very nice-looking people ; won- 
der what part of the States they are from ; wish we could rind out." 
One of the gentlemen volunteers to look on the register. He comes 
back in amaze. He faintly whispers: " They are San Franciscans." 
"Are you sure? " " Yes, for I asked the clerk." " Well, is it possi- 
ble! I should have taken them for Eastern people. It is simply won- 
derful what an effect has been exerted upon California by the great 
number of tourists who visit it, when their refining influence is as 
perceptible as we have seen it to be." Gracias, muchas gracias ! 

That we have gained in many respects by the destruction of the 
first Del Monte and the erection of the second is undoubted. Still, I 
am loath to lose associations. I must say that, even with all its 
throng of beauty, fashion and general attractiveness in the festivities 
of the season, a lonely feeling stole over me. I gazed with a lively 
sensation of loss, for remember, to me my fellow beings are studies 
in black and white, some — very black. Dr Vernon. 



Reductions in Prices ! 



We respectfully announce AN ENOEMOU3 REDUCTION in PRICES 
throughout our Entire Stock, and invite our Customers to call and see the 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS OFFERING. 



SILKS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


PLAIN VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


FANCY VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


DRESS GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


BLACK GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


HOSIERY 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


GLOVES 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


HOUSE-KEEPING GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 




-AND 







Ladies' Muslin Underwear 



REDUCED PRICES. 



Packages delivered, carriage paid, in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 




Ill, 113, US, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET, 



lO, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 MORTON STREET. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER 



3 



SENSATIONS OF A WALL-FLOWER. 
I had read of balls, an. 1 lonjnd u* retel in their vcitany. With 
bated bn-uth 1 bad followed the bUtory of the poor but beauti- 
ful hennur until I lost my Identity In her. [.too, fell the throb of 
pleeeora thai pulsated through her reins wbi n first she met hei bend- 
some low. I vept with her when be deserted her for ;» blgber prise. 
Hut when, u in heiress t*> unexpected wealth, society opened it* 
doors to her; when, radiant and beautiful, aba stood toe queen of 
II, then did I drink the whispered words »>f adulation ( then did 
[ dirtde with her the exhilaration of ber triumph. But *ix months 
more, l thought, and what triumph would be all my own. How 
■lowly time crept on ; hut at tat it bail passed, ami the day arrived 
the day that heralded the consummation of girlhood's dream, Ah, 
happy dream ! I lived the night's excitement over a hundred times. 
I saw the "tart of admiration and surprise that would follow my en- 
trance Into the ball-room. As < 'larisse and Una and Lillian had been 

surrounded, I saw myself besieged by admirers, all craving introduc- 
tions, -dl begging for dances. Touching all hearty, mine remained 
unmoved until, until 1 met Mm. We danced— a harmonious unison. 
i ». the bliss .,f that dance! the low, dreamy music, the dimly-lighted 
conservatory, the flowers breathing intoxicating fragrance, the soft, 
silver moonlight! 



The grand march is over, and we have formed for the first quadrille. 
The music has ceased. My brother Tom explains that he must leave 
me just for a minute to see about his programme. "All right," I ac- 
quiesce, cheerfully, ** only " Hut before I have time to add an- 
other word Tom is off, and I am left defenseless. How queer the 
men look, running about so! What a confusion! This excitement 
is delicious. I wonder why somebody doesn't come to ask me for a 
dance. What can be the matter? An, there's lieorge Howard com- 
ing this way. How handsome he is ! Yes, he sees me; he is smiling 
at me. Well, if he hasn't gone by. I just believe that he didn't see 
me on purpose. Where is Tom 7 I feel so frightened. It's getting 
late, I'm sure. Where can Mr. Parsons be? Isn't he going to claim 
the dance he engaged? Heavens! If he should come now— and not 
a name on my programme! I would be so ashamed to show it to 
him. 1 think 1*11 say that it is filled. "A dance left for me? " I hear 
a voice inquire with easy assurance. My schemes all take flight in a 
moment I am too bewildered and frightened to say "No;" sol 
meekly hand him my blank card. He stifles any surprise that he 
may feel, puts his name down for the third extra, thanks me, smiles 
and vanishes. Ah, how I hate him ! 

Where can Tom be? Nobody can ask me to dance without an in- 
troduction, so I'm sure I'm not to blame. " So sorry, but I have not 
one left," I hear the girl at my left remark to a disappointed suitor. 
As he departs she turns to me, beaming, and says: " It's going to be 
a lovely ball. I only wish " — with an affected pout — " that there were 
more dances. It's so hard to refuse one's friends. Isn't it?" I always 
used to like that girl, but somehow I cannot tolerate her to-night. 
Spiteful thing, to flaunt her programme right in my face! 0, there 
are the Lovell boys. I thought Id cut them to-night, but I suppose 
they are better than nobody, and you don't catch me giving her a 
chance to say that no one asked me to dance. So 1 gather up my 
forces and smile an invitation to the stupid ninnies, who soon nave 
scribbled their names opposite two dances. I'll be just as hateful to 
them as I can for making me dance with them. 

If the music isn't commencing, and here am I with only three 
dances engaged ! What shall I do ? Where is my brother? It serves 
me right, though. I ought to have known better than to have trusted 
myself to such an easy-going, careless good-for-nothing. Everybody 
is bowing the introduction to the dance. I try to look unconscious as 
I bestow a stately, sweeping salute upon— space. Rut all the faces of 
the set express the ridiculousness of my position. I feel my cheeks 
burning, and with the consciousness that they are a hideous scarlet I 
bow with the worst grace to my astonished "comer." A rush, a 
scramble, and I feel, rather than see, that Tom is at my side. 
" Couldn't help it! " he whispers, apologetically; " was trying to get 
a dance with Minnie Kivers. She was just hemmed in by the fel- 
lows." That is the last straw. Minnie Kivers and I had once been 
rivals. "You wretch!" I say, in a choked whisper, "my card is 
empty. Why didn't you introduce me? " But Tom isoff.and my 
" comer," regarding me in an amused way that is maddening, asks, 
with assumed grievance: "Ain't you going to turn with me?" I 
stammer my apologies, and allow myself to be wheeled around. 

"Now, don't worry," Tom adjures me, as the sides commence. 
" Everything will be all right. You have the next dance? " 
" Yes," I assent, discontentedly. 

" Then don't think any more about it." And with an air of having 
settled the matter, Tom enters with a zeal into the dance, and also 
into a violent flirtation with his opposite. But for me there is no 
peace. My mind, far from the dance, is busy with fears for the re- 
mainder of the evening. All the perils of a ball have suddenly been 
opened before me. All sorts of terrible possibilities crowd my brain. 

Suppose that Tom has filled his programme ; suppose that " 

" Madge, what are you about? " With a start I awake from my 
worried reverie, to discover that I have given the wrong hand in the 
"grand right and left," and so brought the set into confusion. 0, 
the ill-concealed smiles of those men. 0, the pitying glances of those 
girls. My kingdom for a charitable earthquake, that would open the 
earth and engulf this miserable dancer. Sufficient for this quadrille 
is the evil thereof, and at last it has ended. 

" Well," begins Tom, with aggravating deliberation, as we prom- 
enade, " let's see. Whom will I introduce you to? " 

"Anybody?" I cry, desperately ; " anything, only don't leave me 
alone in this hall again. Couldn't we possibly go home? I don't be- 
lieve that I feel very well." 

" Don't talk nonsense, child. You look all right. Why, you're as 
rosy as a peony. Besides, how can I go home? My programme is 
filled down to the second extra. 0, there are the boys; but you said 
you didn't care to know them." 

"Anybody, anybody," I cry, fast becoming hysterical, as I see my 
next partner making his way toward me. Four or five of Tom's 



flienda come tO meet Us. Ml BmilC the same rneaiiinel.- - - -mile, all 

bow the same labored bow, and all ask, with what seem* to mi 
parent hvpoorisy, if they are bo fortunate aatobeabli 
dance. OonsideriiM my frame <>f mind, I doubt tin- forturv 

have leoured ; but I only smile— such a painful, wot be-gone c rac 

tion and l know that peace i> mine until supper. 
it ha- oome. I dreaded it. 1 expected it. And yet I hoped against 

1 see it written upon the fa. e of everv DOS Who pi 

hear it in the whisper of every gentleman to hi> lady. Tin- rerj 

seems i. > have taken up the theme and breathes ft forth with everv 
measure. DIsgutsa iB useless. 1 am a wall-Mower. Tom hit- 
peared from the dame ball I have seen nothing of him slnCO SUp- 

per. By this time he Is probably In the. depths ol a tete-a-t&'fe 
Itvious of the fact that he has a sister. There is no refuge, i must 

bear it, and, if possible, graciously. Su I summon up tin air of BterSO 

typed happiness that would do credit to a ballet-dancer) lean back 

and try to look tired. But I do not deceive myself. I know that 1 
have only succeeded in looking dejected and miserable. How large 
the hall is? I never noticed its size before. Now it seems to swell 
in proportions, and make me appear the more piteous and desolate. 
What do they mean by looking at me in that manner! Have 1 com- 
mitted a crime? I see each couple regard me from afar, and then 
turn resolutely aside, too kind to seem to witness my humiliation. 
Dear, sweet girls! I know well that they are saying:'" Poor thing. 
I wonder why she hasn't a partner. I'm so sorry- for her." And to- 
morrow I will have the sympathy of the town. To-morrow— if itonly 
were to-morrow. 

Will this dance never end? I do believe that the musicians arc 
playing longer just out of pure malice. Here comes Minnie Kivers. 
I never saw such an affected creature. I don't see what the men can 
find attractive about her. But she's so forward; she would push 
herself anywhere. If she only would'ntsee me. Yes— she's coming 
this way. " Why did I wear this bright red— nobody can help notic- 
ing it. 

" Why aren't you dancing? " she asks, lightly, playfully rapping 
me on the shoulder with her fan. As if she coufdn tsee why I'm not 
dancing. 

" I feel a little tired," I stammer, blushing at my palpable false- 
hood. " Yes, you look as if you needed rest, dear," she returns with 
commiseration; and with a smile and nod she passes on. Won't I 
have my revenge! I'll just give a party and not invite her. I'll buy 

Tom to cut her. I'll Thank heaven, the music has stopped. 

If they are not clapping for an encore. I know 1 shall cry. There 
they dance on again. I don't see how Alice Cummings can dance 
with that stupid boor. Rather than not dance, some girls would 
dance with a man who trod all over their toes. I think those men at 
the door might have enough courtesy to come and talk to me, even 
it they don't dance. 

There's Kate Conroy talking to her brother. They are both look- 
ing this way. I know they are speaking about me. Sure enough— 
she is bringing him over here. What shall I do? 1 will refuse him. 
No, that will look as if I am piqued. They are stopping. At last 
the music has ceased. 

Of course, now my dear brother appears. I don't trust myself to 
talk to him. He takes my programme, scans it hurriedly, and says: 
" Well, you're fixed finely for the rest of the evening." 

" Fixed, indeed," think I, bitterly. If all my happy dreams of the 
day were to be realized — if the delights of heaven itself were to open 
for me— no, not even then would I be compensated for those minutes 
of torture when I stood upon the social pillory— a wall-flower 

Francisco, January 7, 1888. Harriet Lane. 



San Ft 



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NoT . 12 .] 852 Market Street, Sole Agent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP, THE BOYS ARE MARCHING. 
In they come, like flies invading the kitchen before a rain. These 
battered hulks of men, stranded wrecks, old stiffs, dead beats and 
bums, are lifted by the flood tide of the rainy season and aTe floated 
high upon the shores, the Barbary Coasts of the great cities. There, 
to strain the nautical figure a little further, this flotsam and jetsam 
of society go into the docks for repairs. "The boys" are literally 

^touring in upon us. They begin to make their appearance with the 
ast load of fruit from the country. They emerge from their bunks 
along the wharves, they crawl out of hay barges and grain lofts, or, 
like the worms after a shower, they seem to have wriggled up through 
the cracks of the sidewalk. They appear, and that is all there is 
about it. 

Already they have opened the winter campaign. They raid on dwel- 
lings, and begfrom timorous women and children. They steal our 
bread and drain every drop from the early-morning can. More than 
one angry housekeeper who has suffered Irom their depredations has 
put a few ounces of tartar emetic into the can, with what result to 
the members of the Walking Club may be imagined. They leave the 
symbols of their tramp fraternity, the free masonry of their guild, 
upon our lintels and door-posts. By certain cabalistic signs they in- 
dicate the generosity or penuriousness of the dweller beyond the 
threshhold. They anathematize in lead pencil those householders 
too astute to be taken in by their pitiful tales or who point-blank 
refuse to give them " the price of a night's lodging." They try to 
regulate their visits to such times as will find the lady of the house 
alone at the table, enjoying the remainder of her own breakfast, 
after her liege lord and master has bolted his coffee and rushed off 
to the office. Your experienced tramp must have hot coffee and 
rolls; white sugar, not brown, for his cup. He mutters what sounds 
more like a malediction than a blessing as his demand for something 
to eat is met by a food wrapped in a paper. To attest his apprecia- 
tion of all such charity, he either deposits the entire parcel on the 
front steps, or throws it in the street. 

" Work! '' exclaimed a tramp, with an indescribable accent of dis- 
gust, when his appeal for clothes had brought forth a chance for him 
to earn them. " Work! who said anything about work? I'm look- 
ing for a shirt, not for work." 

Recently a gay and festive member of the go as you please, heel 
ami toe fraternity, has been terrorizing the lower portion of Van 
Ness avenue. He called at one house last week, where his mum- 
bled address was greeted with an abrupt no and a rapidly closed door. 
Thereupon he revenged himself by kicking the door and swear- 
ing most vigorously. At another house his pull at the bell was ans- 
wered by a timid maid servant, who looked out of the window, as she 
did not dare to open the door. On seeing a strange man standing 
there, she at once shut down the window. This measure of safety so 
enraged the knight of the pedals that he forthwith began a cobble 
stone bombardment of the window. Fortunately, his aim was not 
good nor his hand steady, so his first attempt was a failure. Before 
he could make a second, a policeman appeared, incredible though it 
may seem, and frightened away the tramp, who proved to be an ex- 
convict. What he will do next remains to be seen. 



ON WHAT FOOD DOES THIS GOD LIVE? 

A few days ago the Board of Health, in the discharge of the 
duties intrusted to it, declared smallpox to be epidemic in this city, 
and requested the Chief of Police to direct the force under him to 
render it some small assistance in its efforts to stamp out this danger- 
ous scourge. The reporters of the daily press united in stating that 
this wonderful public official was highly "indignant" because of 
such a request being made to him, and that he promptly declared 
that he would not allow the policemen whom he commands, and for 
whose services the public pays, to in any way assist the Board of 
Health in checking the spread of a pestilential disease. Subsequently 
and silently he withdrew from the untenable position in which he 
had placed himself, and the men who compose the Police Force have, 
we believe, done everything within their power to assist the Health 
Officers. Objection was promptly taken to the Police Department D3- 
ing employed to assist in a useful public work, because those who 
control it have come to regard it a private institution, the purpose of 
which is to levy blackmail on the criminal and vicious elements of 
society to the tune of $30,000 or $40,000 per month; and that objec- 
tion was promptly removed an hour or so afterwards because a mo- 
ment or two of reflection convinced the " Upper Office " that, while 
public opinion might remain passive under the knowledge that crime 
paid a large sum for immunity, a refusrfl to assist in stamping out 
smallpox was a matter which came too close to every man's hearth- 
stone to be persisted in with safety. 

One of the first inquiries which the average citizen made, upon 
reading the Chief of Police's imperious declaration that the force 
which costs this city hundreds of thousands of dollars per annum to 
support should not be used to assist, in a grave emergency, in pro- 
tecting the public health, was: " Who is this great personage, this 
autocrat, who issues his ukase as though he were the Czar of all 
the Russias?" Well, his name is Patrick Crowley. 

The iron industry is in a flourishing condition and unable to keep 
up with the local demands of the country. In consequence large im- 
portations take place. The production of pig iron during 1887 was 
increased by 000,000 tons, the total being 6,250,000 tons. The pros- 
perity of the railroad service is evidenced by an increase of 375,000 
tons of Bessemer steel rails manufactures, the total product being 
about 1,950,000 tons. Besides this 160,000 tons were imported. Penn- 
sylvania, with its iron trade, ought to be able to play " a lone hand " 
by this time. 

Jack Frost is the original freeze oil party. Hiszeroic methods are 
not much admired, however. 

When a singer's voice breaks her pocket-book isn't long in fol- 
lowing suit. 

"Our relations are strained," said Charley, as he squeezed Cousin 
Clara. 



FIRST OFFERING! 

Monday, January 9, 1888, 



SUBDIVISION No. 1 



PALERMO 

CITRUS TR^CT, 

Five Miles South of Oroville, 

In the Heart of the Citrus Belt, 

Butte County, California. 

"A Region upon which Nature has Lavished her Choicest Gifts in the 
way of Climate, Soil and Landscape Beauty." 

2,000 Acres, in Subdivisions ot 1, 2, 3, 5, 10 and 20 Acre Lots 

and Building Lots in the Town of PALERMO, located near 

the Center of the Tract, on the line of the 

Northern California Railroad. 

On Monday, January 9, 1888, at 9 a. m., we will open the sale of acre lots 
iu subdivision No. 1, of Palermo Citrus Tract and of building lots in the 
new town of Palermo, which lies in nearly the center of the property, aud 
is located directly on the line of the Northern California Railroad. The 
entire subdivision, including the town site, is almost perfectly level, and 
with the exception of a portion which is covered by giant live and white 
oaks, is all clear. The soil is a rich red aud black gravelly loam, and is 
adapted to the culture of the orange, lemon, pomegranate, fig, plum, peach, 
pear, apple, olive, grape, and almost every citrus aud deciduous fruit 
known. The celebrated Wheeler exhibit at the late Citrus Fair in Oroville 
and now at our office, was all produced on land adjoining the Palermo 
Citrus Tract. 

TTNPRECEDENTED INDUCEMENTS. 

This initial offering of valuable property in the Northern Citrus Belt 
brings with it some novel and extraordinary inducements. 

FIRST.— Our terms on acre lots will be 25 per cent, cash, with the balance 
payable in from 1 to 4 years, at the option of the purchaser. 

SECOND.— Purchasers can secure their choice of lots by paying a deposit 
of ten (10) per cent, of the purchase money on and after Monday, January 
9, 1888, and can have 30 days to examine the property. If they find we have 
in any way misrepresented it, their deposit will be returned and traveling 
expenses refunded. 

THIRD.— As an inducement to plant trees and vines, aud otherwise im- 
prove the property, we offer to all those who will do so before July, 1889, 

For irrigating purposes for four (4) years from that date. The Feather River 
aud Ophir Canal, which is now supplying the principal orange groves and 
gardens in and around Oroville, is being extended on the Palermo Citrus 
Tract, and water will be thoroughly distributed over the tract within the 
next few months. Irrigation is not necessary, however, except to citrus 
fruits and late vegetables. Splendid well water is obtainable at from fifteen 
to forty feet. 

FOURTH.— In the new town of Palermo the avenues, which are broad 
and spacious, will all be uniformly leveled off and symmetrically graded ; 
as speedily as possible water will be piped throughout the town; a depot 
will be built there within sixty days, and a handsome hotel will be erected 
shortly thereafter. 

FItvTH.— The terms of sale on the town lots will be on«-half cash, balance 
in one or two years, at purchasers' option. 

5, 10 and 20 acre lots, with water rights, at $75 per acre. Palermo 
Lots, $50 to $200 each ; size, 50x150, 

Lots in even-numbered blocks only will be sold in San Francisco. Odd- 
numbered blocks will be offered in Oroville, and no lots will be sold before 
MON DAY, January 9, 1888, at 9 o'clock a. m. 



IFIIRST COME, FIBST SZEZR-VIEID. 
Further particulars of 

MCAFEE BROTHERS, 

10 Montgomery St,, San Francisco. 



Jan. 7.J 



T. B. LUDLUM & CO., 

Oroville, Butte County, Cal. 



:, isss. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR. 



SOCIETY. 



This has been mother week of ram. with several decided, but un- 
lucreasful, attempts at snow, which, no doubt, wo shall have before 
the Winter i> over, for thai our ollniate ia changing In that reepeoi 1 
do not Uiink there remains much question SoQbu life baa been al- 
most ai 'lull as tin- weather, and more dreary days than the two with 
which the year opened it would be difficult to Imagine. There were 
wry few oalli made on Monday, and even fewer houses were open to 
recelTo. Nearly all the upper cruel of our social stratum had taken 
themselves off to tin- seaside, and though the new Del Uonte was 
found tn be an i-vcii more delightful hostelry than the old one, from 
all that I tan hear those who went there to enjoy the holiday did not 
have u gay a time as they anticipated. 

There were, however, a few people left in town, and a number of 
New Year's Kve parties were given, prominent among them being the 
annual entertainment that the members ol" I he San Francisco Yerein 
Club always provide for their friends. All the rooms of the* lub were 

f^re>>ed ititu service on this occaaion, gaily decorated and brilliantly 
ighted, and an immense Christmas tree standing in the ballroom, 

laden with souvenirs, attracted universal attention. Dancing was, of 
coarse, the chief feature of the evening's pleasure, ami at LI a very 

elegant supper was served. After the New Year had been appropri- 
ately welcomed, more dancing ensued, and merriment reigned su- 
preme until a very late hour. 

Most of the absentees returned to town about the middle of the 
week, hut it has socially been a broken one, and little of moment has 
taken place in fashionable circles. Last night the Army german, 
under the leadership of Lieutenant Bean, was danced at B'nai B'rith 
Hall, it being the fourth of the series of the Bachelor Club cotillions 
given there this season, and for this time Mr. Greenaway very grace- 
fully yielded bis place and took a back seat. The Misses". lonih, those 
talented young sisters, also gave a concert at Irving Hall, previous to 
their departure for the East and then to Europe for study. 

The principal events of next week will be the Mau-Bandmnnn wed- 
ding on Wednesday night ; the party at Judge Wallace's, on Van Ness 
avenue, on Thursday evening; and Mrs. Goad's tea on Saturday after- 
noon. Mrs. Miller's (net Grace Jones) wedding receptions are also on 
the cards, and invitations are out for several large dinner parties. 

A very pretty wedding was the one solemnized last week at Mare 
Island "Navy Yard, between Miss Annie Williams and Lieutenant 
John Ellicoit of U. S. S. Raitger. The chapel where the ceremony 
was performed by the Chaplain of the yard, the Rev. Mr. Thompson, 
was prettily dressed with flowers and evergreens, and the usual wed- 
ding bell was suspended in the chancel; and as the dav was dark and 
rainy, the sacred edifice was brightly lighted by gas during the ser- 
vice. The bride, who was given away by her father, Captain C. F. 
Williams, of the Marine Corps, was attended bv the Misses Collier, 
Irwin, Stoneman and Taylor as bridesmaids ; and after the ceremony 
a reeeption was held at the residence of the bride's father. The happy 
pair came down to the city later in the day, and have been spending 
the week at the Occidental Hotel. Miss Bettie Hays and Mr. John 
McMullin had the most inclement day of the season for their wed- 
ding, which took place on Wednesday last at Alameda. 

The latest announced engagement between Miss Lulu Otis, daugh- 
ter of the late James Otis, who was one of our oldest, and, in his life- 
lime, one of our most popular residents, and young Hall McAllister, 
the son of one and nephew of another who can claim a like distinc- 
tion, has given universal satisfaction to friends and acquaintances of 
both the contracting parties, and the wedding is looked forward to 
with most pleasant anticipations— that it will be a delightful reunion 
of those known as the "old set." 

Mrs. Catherwood, who has been absent in Europe for a year or 
more, is looked for on her return some time next week. She spent 
the recent holidays in Washington, where she greatly enjoyed her- 
self. Mr. and Mrs. Richards, nee Kate Bancroft, are at the Pleasanton, 
where they will spend the rest of the Winter, and also to be found 
there are Mr., Mrs. and Miss Spence. of San Jose. Mrs. Iznaga, who 
has spent the greater part of the past year in San Francisco, in order, 
by obtaining legal residence here, to facilitate her divorce from her 
husband, left for the East and Europe on Wednesday last, having 
procured the desired freedom from her bonds. Mrs. Iznaga was quite 
a feature in our social world during her visit, and was the recipient 
of many attentions and hospitalities. Apropos of the remarks made 
by a morning paper on the subject of her departure, I have often 
wondered why the average newspaper reporter will persist in making 
such outrageous mistakes as some of the assertions the article in 
question contained, when, by a little trouble, he could assure himself 
of the correctness of the information he seems so anxious to impart, 
(iranted that Miss Iznaga married Viscount Mandeville, the eldest 
son of the Duke of Manchester— and who, bv the way, has the repu- 
tation of being one of the biggest blackguards in England — how does 
that make her an English princess, nor even the Lady Consuelo? 
She is simply the Viscountess Mandeville. Another query is why 
Mrs. Iznaga's divorced husband's sister, having married one of the 
English nobility, makes Mrs. Iznaga of " more than ordinary social 
distinction?" Had Miss Consuelo Iznaga married a burglar* would 
that have entitled all her connections to rank with convicts? 

Felix. 

Mr. Theodore Wores, the well-known artist, has just returned 
from Japan where he has spent the past three years in the active 
study of the characteristics of that peculiar people and their won- 
derful country. The result he has brought back with him on a large 
number of canvasses which he proposes to exhibit at the rooms of 
the San Francisco Art Association next week. This exhibition is one 
which should be widely attended, for its interest will involve more 
than a mere appreciation of the painter's art. It will be a veritable 
panorama of Japanese life and Japanese scenery, as well as a display 
of high class art. Mr. Wores contemplates taking the whole exhibit 
East with him on February 7th, and has every reason to believe that 
it will meet with an enthusiastic reception in the art centers along 
the Atlantic coast. 



A CURIOUS PROCLAMATION. 
Tin* following appeared an »n advertisement ma recent tana of 
the Pall "/„// uTfl $(u. 

N"i I* i: PROC1 WlATKiN No. |. 
TBALPALQAB BQ U A RE, hINi/s PSOP08A I.. 

1. The King Ivan (son of Ferdinand and Maria), heir-at-law of 

toe property ol the Crown, and .1 Trafalgar Square, finding that 

a dispute has arisen as to the Square, and that II has been thi 

ol violence between the Metropolitan Police and the people, pi ■ 

to cede it entirely to the people as a public winter and summer 

garden. 

2. The lasi ancestor of the King was, in England, Charlee I., be- 
headed bj I romwell; and tin- revenues ol the properties and domains 
01 the King are now in the hands of the country, and kept for him 
by thepeople. The King is satisfied. 

5. The plan oi the King as to the Square Is to roof it with move- 
able frames, ;m .i as to the garden to tuo the trees, and have it entire- 
ly moveable. The present asphalt paving will therefore remain In- 
tart, as also all the parapets and 1 niments of the Square. 

I. Should the Square be required for forum purposes, it will he 
used only under .over, and the users are liable Tor damage by wilful 
or malicious violence. 

.">. Tin- raised terrace on the National Gallery side is reserved for 
commissioned officers in uniform of the national, attached and friend- 
ly services, with their immediate female relatives. 

6. The King's quarteringa of the Sqnare shall have separate en- 
trances to price for public entertainment, and for halls badges shall 
be worn according to the colours of the King, either colour, to choice 
from time to time by arrangement being for either quarter. 

7. The King's estimate— to make the Square in every way suitable 
asa Winter and Summer metropole of the people— IS fifty thousand 
pounds sterling, and he requests the opinion of the people and press 
without prejudice on his proposals. 

S. Should, in his estimation, the general opinion he conclusively 
favorable, the king in person will raise the money, and in conjunc- 
tion with the national Executive, do it for the people, it being finally 
understood that all surplus revenues go to public and beneficent ob- 
jects. 

9. The King— legitimate and hereditary Sovereign of the Nation — 
is aware of the existence in the country of a reigning Titular Sover- 
eign, and Titular Prince of Wales— rendering the internal condition 
similar to what has existed in Japan. 

With heart greeting, Ivan. 

Anderton's Hotel, Fleet street. 

Speaker Carlisle has appointed the Committees, and the Pacific 
Coast does not get a single chairmanship, and Morrow is our only con- 
gressman to be named on an important committee. He is giver, a 
place on the Foreign Affairs committee, where he ought to be able to 
do some service in promoting his bills for the more effectual restric- 
tion of Chinese immigration. Why cannot California select a really 
able man to represent her in Congress, and keep him there until he 
has had time to make a name and influence for himself and his State? 



The "Ormuz," of the Oriental line of steamers, recently delivered 
the English mail between London and South Australia in less than 
24 days. She made an average speed of lfi knots the whole way. 
The steamers under the new contract are making their trips weekly 
with great regularity, and their time defies competition. And, with- 
al, the business is said to be exceedingly profitable. A recently built 
steamer, of the Peninsular and Oriental line, is said to have paid her 
cost of building within six months. 



The mention of Mr. Ingram's estate recalls to me the Rev. Julius 
Hatch, the old man corpulent, who made such a noble effort to 
secure that property for the support of his declining years. Dear old 
Julius — parson, journalist, and guide to old ladies with young hus- 
bands, who want to find out what is going on— it was sad that Judge 
Coffey could not see this business through my spectacles. But cheer 
up. The town is full of old ladies, and they are ever on the lookout 
for young husbands. 

One way to preserve the harmonious relations of a fashionable 
family is to insist that the coachman shall eat onions three times a 
day. — Milwaukee Journal. 



ce&st&e/ 




■&* «»* 1 ' a& s*r 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



MAG AT DEL MONTE. 
Dear N. L. :— Warn't it too bad 't " Jupiter Pluvins " (he's the chap, 
isn't he?) should a corue down in bis wrath just about the end o the 
year, 'n spoil all the New Year's festivities? Ned says that we wini- 
men ain't got no right to growl, 'cause we had all the bright sunshine 
'n blue skies for our Christmas shoppin'— but la me, if wimmen am t 
been lyin' oft' for I can't tell how long, lookin' forward to moonlight 
on the balcony 'n in the grounds to Monterey— 'n to have to do your 
carryin' on right in the face 'n eyes o' everybody, all kept indoors by 
the rain, is rather disappointin', now ain't it? Well, I s pose id 
better begin at the very beginnin', 'n say how when we got to Del 
Monte the very first person 't we struck (o' course, not really, you 
know, only in speech like) was the old Judge, who'd been^ havin a 
vacation o' some days down there already. He was layin' it on for 
dear life to some female 't we couldn't see, as his back was towards 
us, but 1 felt real good, 'cause I was arrivin' at dear old Del Monte 
once again, 'n so without thinkin' I hollered right out " let her go, 
Gallagher," 'n my ! didn't I catch it though from ma, Ned n comp ny. 
Kvery one 't we met in the hotel appeared like they was gone crazy a 
gazin' up at the sky to see if the sun 'd come ont, sure enough, for the 
tennis match, 'n so it did, 'n the play come off, 'n folks played off it 
was awful nice ; but the smell o' damp in the air, 'n the wet grass in 
the grounds, 'n the feelin' 't the sunshine warn't a sure thing, made 
it what Ned called a mixed pleasure; 'n I reckon 't some o' them 
gaily adorned chaps have pains in their bones, if the truth is told. 

It was a real delight to see the lovely Del Monte again. O. K. as it 
was (only nicer, 'cause it's bigger), 'n the big fires blazin', n folks 
sittin' round 's sociable 's vou please. Talk about the Santa Barb ra 
hotel !— pshaw ! there ain't none of 'em 't can hold a candle to Del 
Monte. Well, o' course every one was delighted to see us, 'u then 
come the question among us girls what was we a goin' to wear to the 
Most o' the wimnieu decided on keepin' their 



hop Saturday night. -. 

finest gowns (no toney person ever says dress now ; gown is so Eng- 
lish, you know) for Monday night, 'cause the majority of the beaux 



was expected then. You see, it's a pretty expensive toot for a bank 
clerk or Army ofFcer, railway 'n hotel fare 'n so forth, 'n if "press o' 
business " prevents a fellah from havin' more 'n one night, o' course 
he'd choose Monday, 'cause he'd have to go back on Tuesday to his 
duties, don't you see? But I'm wandering. Let's see, where was I, 
anyhow? Debatin' about what we'd wear, wasn't it? That vexed 
question was soon settled, 'n most o' the girls was goin' to wear black 
or white. Then I took a tour round to see who'd come. There was 
the two widdahs 'ts so killin' intimate. Ma says it's been a friendship 
since before I was born. If that's so, they oughter get medals for 
feminine constancy. I reckon 't the prettiest one sort o' bosses the 
fat one (she's used to doin' it in palmy days). Then a little further 
up the room was the old crowd o' two years ago, same loud voices, 'n 
actions just for all the world like they owned the whole shebang. I 
should think 't seein' so many o' the quiet, well-behaved girls gettin' 
engaged, 'n thev still, like Queen Elizabeth, goin' on in maiden free- 
dom, 'd kind o' show 'em the winnin' card was modest demeanor 
(ain't that for all the world like one o' the Judge's sentences?) The 
chap 't leads the second cut cotillions was playin' devotion to one o' 
the tall, lank sisters; Monte Wilson was skirmishin' round the bru- 
nette (much good it'll do him); the rich, good-natured sister-in-law 
had pretty Nellie along with her, 'n them amiable grandparents had 
brought down their attractive lass. Minnie was lookin' awful hand- 
some (1 don't mean the one 'ts got a Mayoress sister, I'd have you 
to know). Only think o' Faison niakin' the riffle ! The millionairess 
'n her two rosebud daughters 'n the recently arrived other side o' the 
Bonanza was all there. Young Sherwood was talkin' to Maggie 's if 
he thought she was awful sweet. Now, I do think 't he's one o' the 
nicest fellahs goin', but for gracious sake don't g_o 'n say 't I said so. 
I reckon 't Robbie 'n Maude had 's good a time m that warm corner 
o' the room 's anybody goin'. I wonder if they're goin' to have more 
theatricals. Young Eastland sort o' kept under the friendly wing o' 
Milty's pretty ma. The chap (every one knows who I mean) with the 

Sepper 'n salt whiskers was tryin' to captivate the young lady from 
ew York. The Judge asked us a riddle on the spot. Says he, "Why 
would one know that lady was patrician? " Says I, "What's that? a 
Irish descent?" He glared at me like anythin', 'n says he, " No, 
Miss Pert-box (there's a name for you), because she is good blood." 
The old man 'd sort o' have to go backwards like the crab to make 
his meanin' clear. There was two matrons with bronze hair, but, la 
me! the Bella Vista one can't come up to (as the Judge would say) 
Mistress Nopie, you bet. Moon-eyed Charley's pet matron was on 
hand with her matrimonial belongin's 'n the Boston outfit. 

The chap 't married the rich widdah 'n sort o' walks like one o' his 
shoulders was up all the time, was there with his wife. Don't they 
always worship at the shrine o' fashion. Some one said 't the newly 
arrived contingent o' the house of Bonanza had fetched four servants 
with 'em. ( I guess that's a fashion they picked up in their foreign 
travel, but Ned said " coal's gone up.") The young Tubbses, 'n oh! 
lots more, was there, so you see a pretty good crowd was on hand al- 
ready. Well, I thought 1 might just as well chip in 'n take a hand, 
so I challenged one o the Casserly boys to a game o' billiards, 'n the 
San Rafael chap, whose nose is the feature of his face, was 's mad as 
a hatter 'cause he was ke-di-do-in' round with Daisy, 'n afraid 't I'd 
tell of him. But I reckon 't you'd like to know bow the hops went 
off. Splendid — both of 'em. Who couldn't have a nice time with a 
lovely ball-room, Ballenberg to play, lots o' nice folks round, 'n my ! 
what a supper! Oysters 'n terrapin till you couldn't rest — 'n wine, 
too — think o' that, you faint-hearted chaps 't didn't go down for fear 
o' bavin' to spend too much. As old John Benson says, " Every- 
thing was lovely 'n the goose bung high." Let me tell you somethin'. 
I guess 't Bessie '11 be the next one engaged — you see. They say 't 
the recent debutante has captured the newly-made medico. Well, 
he's a real nice fellah, *n she s right lucky to get him, if it's so. You 
should a seen a fellah making eyes at the Britisher's widdah. No go, 
I guess. What on top o' this earth that strong-minded virgin o' Sutter 
street wants to such a place 's Del Monte I'm blessed if I can find out. 
Most chaps is afraid o' her, 'n she don't get no attention o' no kind 
whatever. 

Sunday was a awful dreary day, so rainy 'n cold. In the evenin' 



Ballenberg played sacred music, 'n the debutante sang for us. Apro- 
pos o' debutantes (I don't mean her), ain't it sort of amusin', after a 
girl has been goin' to parties for a Winter or two, all of a sudden her 
ma gives a party for the purpose of introducin' her into society. 
What on top o' this earth does it mean, d' ye s'pose? Warn't she in- 
troduced to the society she went into before? Mag pauses for a reply. 
One or two 't didn't mind the rain went drivin'. 'n some took baths 
(o' course I mean in the tank). Every one was talkin' about the Arm y 
german. Fancy callin' it that 'cause Bean is to lead it, though I 
reckon it won't be such a bad effort, 'n I'll tell you all about it next 
time. You'd a died laughin' if you could a seen some folks 't shall 
be nameless— 'cause every one '11 know right well who I mean— layin' 
it on thick to a certain lady, so 's to get asked to the fancy party! 
Just think of another engagement in our set. I declare they come so 
quick now, it's like the epidemic— " another case verified "—but ma 
says it's real nice to see the old set as representatives (Lordy, what a 
long word !) pairin' off 'n keepin' up the families. 1 feel like sayin', 
"O wise young Judge" (who says 't I ain't seen Shakspeare's plays?) 
The girl 't wore yaner to the Saturday evenin' hop is a right sweet- 
lookin' girl. Jack said she was " insipid." Did you ever hear any- 
thin' like that fellah's cool cheek? That awful vulgar couple from 
the upper country was a nourishin' round. It's about their only 
chance o' gettin' in the swim, 'n as Ned said, hotel rackets is quite in 
the line o' both of 'em. 

I reckon 't some o' the folks 't went down for a rippin' old time 
was kind o' disgusted at findin' it a trifle slow like, 'n some 't went for 
a good time had too much in-door racket to suit, so 't when Tuesday 
mornin' come there was a real smart number ready to return to the 
city, 't every one expected to have remained down for a week any- 
how. We come up 'cause I told ma 't I'd had enough in mine, but 
it did seem so mean 't just 's we was ready to leave out come the sun 
'n fine weather. I gave the old Judge a riddle as a partin' shot. Says 
I, " Look here, old gentleman, I've been studyin' what on top o' this 
earth you meant by callin' that New York young lady patrician, 'n 
am goin' to ask vou a conundrum ; Why does the term just fit the 
Frisco elite? " '" My child," says he, " that is just what it does not 
do." " But my gTacious," says I, " when you point out a big swell 
don't you say that's a Pat-ric'h-'un-too? " I wish you could a heard 
the howl 't went up as we drove off. I do believe 't the old boy '11 
pay me off in not givin' me the New Year's present 't he promised. 
Well, I don't care, so, till the bachelors' german 't I'm gom' to guff 
about, ta ta. Mag. 

Since we commenced the publication of the series of artotypes 
known as " Artistic Homes of California," there has been a continu- 
ous inquiry for back numbers. Having reprinted those of which the 
edition was exhausted, we are now in a position to supply all 
who wish to have a complete file of these pictures. Neat and attract- 
ive portfolios, made expressly for preserving the artotypes, are for 
sale at the business office, Fourth and Market-streets Building, for 
fifty cents each. 

The following recipe is said to be a cure for smallpox. It has 
been repeatedly published in the papers — the News Letter among 
others — and in the interests of science and humanity, should be 
thoroughly tested : Sulphate of zinc, one grain; foxglove (digitalis), 
one grain ; half a teaspoonful of sugar ; mix with two teaspoonf uls 
of water. When thoroughly mixed add four ounces of water. Take 
a spoonful every hour. The disease will disappear in twelve hours, 
for a child, smaller doses, according to age. 



Silver Furniture ! 
Never before shown in this market. Chadbourne's, 741, 713 and 715 
Market street. 

Santa Cruz Suburban and Seaside Building Sites still at reasonable 
prices. Also, Vineyards, Orchards and Fruit Lands totally independent of 
irrigation. In a climate of the very happiest medium, surrounded by ex- 
quisite scenery. Illustrated Price List free by mail. Address 

Exchange and Mart, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



Coronation is the crowning event of a monarch's career, and Madame 
Rachel's Bloom of Youth is the finest cosmetic in the market. 

HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 




FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 

Under Grand Hotel. 



[Dec. 17. 



DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 

J. COOPER, 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 



24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building. 



[Dec. 17. 



MRS, DARLING, DRESSMAKER, 



Having lately secured the services of a well-known French draper, in 
conjunction with the best of cutters and fitters, is prepared to make 
Street, Evening or Stage Dresses, at short notice. 



No. 37 FIFTH ST., San Francisco, Cal. 



TJan. 7. 



Jan. 7, 188*. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWs LETTER. 



SORROW. 
Upon my li|» ihe laid her touch dlvbw. 

Ami merry ipaeoh and carelesa tAOgutar dlod; 
She. iim-'I ln-r mwaooholy eyes on mine, 

Ami would not be denied. 
1 saw Ihe mri wind loose bin clondlejN white, 
In iKH-k> oareertog Lhroogh the April iky; 
I oonld not ring, though joj waa at its highi, 

For sin- >i«kh] BUenl by. 
I watched tin- lovely evening fade away— 

A mist was Ughtty drawn serosa tlir >u.rs, 
Bhs. broke my i|inel dream I heard her say, 
*■ Behold your prison ba 
" llartli's sJadnsaa shall not satisfy your soul, 

This beauty of the World in which you live; 
Tlie crowning >;ratv that sanctities the whole i 
That I alone oan give." 

1 heard, ami shrunk away from her afraid ; 

Hut still she held me, and would still abide. 
Youth's bounding pulses Blackened and obeyed) 

With si,»wly ebbing tide. 
*' Look thou beyond the evening Hky," she said, 
•• Beyond the changing splendors of the day. 
Accept the pain, the weariness, the dread, 

Accept and bid me stay! " 
I turned and clasped her close, with sudden strength 

And slowly, sweetly I became aware, 
Within my anus God's angel stood, at length, 

White robed and calm and fair. 
And now I look beyond the evening star, 

Beyond the changing splendors of the day, 
Knowing the pain he sends more precious far, 
More beautiful than they. 

THAT CHAMBER AND THAT BOARD. 
It is to be noted that no set of human beings yet have ever been re- 
formed. What happens is that the Obstructives die in the course of 
nature, and the Constructives, who have grown up with the new 
ideas, come to the fore. Not even the famed surgical operation by 
which a joke is insinuated into the Caledonian brain would avail to 
lodge a new idea into the heads represented by the San Francisco 
Hullitin, for example. You never could have got a new idea into the 
old Examiner (or the folks it stood for) — not with a beetle and wedge. 
What happened was, that the Examiner passed into new hands— into 
the hands of one of the new Constructives. You might club the Alto's 
head into a jelly in a mistaken effort to make it think; it would go on 
thinking with its sitting part, as it has done for thirty-three years. 
Or take the Chamber of Commerce. We suppose that we are within 
bounds in saying that the San Francisci i * 'hamber of Commerce col- 
lectively knows less — that is, possessed of less actual information, less 
real comprehension of public questions— than any other body of men 
in the world, if we except perhaps one. That one is the San Fran- 
cisco Board of Trade. Looking back over what is now a respectable 
term of years, we fail to recall one, among some scores of "resolu- 
tions " adopted by these two Boards, in the adoption of which the 
body concerned did not make an ass of itself; not one which the lapse 
of hve years from its adoption has not shown to be manifestly and 
admittedly asinine. Our recollection is equally at fault for an in- 
stance where either body failed to "reject*' resolutions and so on 
that have been brought before it, which a lapse of five years have not 
shown ought to have been adopted by men of any grade of intelli- 
gence above that of an earthworm. In this way, and in the light of 
succeeding events, the proceedings of these two* bodies furnish enter- 
taining and really delightful reading. There is a perversity about the 
proceedings that is hardly " canny ; " one suspects a sort of demoni- 
cal possession, and feels the presence of supernatural and malignant 
powers. When next either of those bodies meets, the intelligent 
reader of the News Lettkr will do well to bear these remarks in 
mind. If he is a member of either body, he will wisely stop away, for 
the odds are he will vote with the majority on a topic as to which he 
is utterly uninformed. 

A correspondent of the "News Letter," writing from Panama, 
under a very recent date, states that almost nothing in the way of 
work is being done on the canal, and that the employees of the com- 
pany, in conversation among themselves, admit that the great water- 
way cannot be completed for years to come. The largest machine 
shops on the Panama section are closed, and those on other sections 
are almost in the same plight. The canal company's treasury is 
about empty, and the few men who are at work, here and there, are 
simply kept for effect. Meanwhile, it is fair to assume that De Les- 
seps is not idle, and it will be strange, indeed, if his fertile brain does 
not devise some method of raising funds to finish a work in which 
his reputation is so deeply involved. 

In accordance with a custom he established some years ago, Mr. 
Martin J. Flavin, proprieter of the IXL stores, treated his employees 
to a banquet on the first of January. The event was an exception- 
ally pleasant one. The bill of fare included every seasonable delicacy, 
and the feast was enlivened with appropriate toasts, songs and reci- 
tations. Mr. Flavin himself is absent in the East, but his place as 
host was well taken by his managers, Messrs. Hogan and Merle. 

The prosperous hardware merchant is usually known by his stovepipe 
hat. He also gets his clothes made at J. W. Carmauy's Tailoring Establish- 
ment, No. 25 Kearny street, and always has a good fit and the best material. 

If you want a delicacy which will make your hair curl (speaking figur- 
atively, of course), go to Moraghan's Parlors, Nos. 68 and 69 California 
Market, and try those famous Blue Point Oysters. 



Misfit institutions bring grist to the mill. 
Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Muller's Optical Depot, 135 



B-A.:r>ric:e. 
LONDON ANO SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Capital $2,100,000 

Sin Frmclsco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, aktiu'k BCBI\ i mi: ajrfAufl Hunger, William Btvbl. 
LONDON hankkks -Bank oJ England and London Joint Rook Ba.uk. 

NEW YORK IT.'X.-I. M-tk-hii A Cm HUSTON I hlnl Natloiml Itmik. 

PhU Bank is prewired to transact ell kinds of General Uaukinc and Y.x 
ohange Business in London and *\*.u Pranolaoo, and bel oltles and 

all parts of the world. Jane 9. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

205 Sansome Street 

Subscribed Capital. S2. 500.000 \ Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $ 1 60,000. 

Head Office .9 and io, Tokanhoiue Yard, Lothbury, London 

Aobntk— NEW YOKK— Agency of the. London Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), «> Exchange Place. PARIS— Meaan. 1-azard Freroii A Cie, 17 Boulevard 
Polnsonicrc. Draw direct on the principal cllicof the World, Commercial 

anil Travelers 1 credits issued. david cahn. ) ,, 

EUGENE MEYER,! "imagers. 
C. Altbchul, Cashier. [ March 26. 

THE AN6L0-GALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YOKK CORRESl'ONDKNT-J. W. Sellgman A Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, *6 000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchauge and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, ( „ 

IGN. STElNUAKT.i Managers. 
P. N. Lii.ienthal, Cashier. [March 26. 

"BANK OF BRrTISTcOLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $1,875,000 

RESERVE FUND 450,000 

Southeast comer California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, New Westminster. Vancouver. Nanalmo and 

Kamloops, British Columbia. 

ThiB Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank: SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; LRE' 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia aud China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank o 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Compauyof Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West IudiesJ-Colonial Bank. [March 26, 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid-tip Capital— $1,800,000, Gold 
President . DANIEL CALLAGH AN | Vice-President . JAMES MOFFITT 
Cashier, E. D. Morgan; Assistant-Cashier, Geo. W. Kline. 
DIRECTORS: 
D. CALLAGHAN, I JAMES D. PHELAN, I JAMES H. JENNINGS, 

C. G. HOOKER, JAMES MOFFITT, GEORGE A. LOW, 

JAMES M. DONAHUE, I N. VAN BERGEN, | GEO. L. DUVAL. 

Correspondents: LONDON— Bank of Montreal, Lombard street. DUB- 
LIN— Provincial Bank of Ireland HAMBURG— Hesse, Neuman & Co. 
PARIS— Hottiuguer 4 Co. NEW YORK— National Bank of Commerce. 
BOSTON— Blackstoue National Bank. CHICAGO— First National Bank. 

This Bank Is prepared to transact a general banking business. Deposits 
received. Exchange for sale on the principal cities of the United States. 
Great Britaiu, Ireiaud aud the Continent. Commercial credits issued, 
available in Europe, China aud Japan. Collections attended to aud prompt 
returns made, at the lowest market rule of exchange. June 28. 

"rfEW ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION (LIMITED). 

CAPITAL £2.000.000 | Subscribed and Paid Up . .£500,000 

HEAD OFFICE-40 THREADNEEDLE STREET, LONDON. 

Bankeus— Union Bank of Loudon (Limited) and Bank of Scotland. 

Edinburgh Agency— 23 St. Andrew Square. 

Branches— Bombay, Calcutta, Colombo, Madras, Muritius, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Singapore. Yokohama, In Australia at Melbourne and Sydney. 

The Bank Buys and Sells Bills of Exchange, makes Telegraphic Transfers, 
issues Letters of Credit and Circular Notes available throughout the world, 
forwards Bills for Collection, undertakes the Purchase aud Sale of Secu- 
rities, holds them for safe custody, and realizes interests and dividends, 
Collects Pay and Pensions, Pay?. Insurance Premiums and Club Subscrip- 
tions, aud Transacts Banking and Agency Business generally. 

Fixed Deposits received for upwards of 12 months at 5 per cent, and at 
correspondingly favorable rates for shorter periods. 

The fullest information can be obtained by application at any of the 
branches and agencies, or at the head office. 

Sept. 24. J GEORGE WILLIAM THOMSON, Secretary. 

THE CROCKFr^WOOLWORThIaTIONAL BANK OF SAn7rANCISW 

322 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

[Oct. 23.J 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



UNSPOKEN WORDS. 
The kindly wordy that rise within the heart, 

And thrill it with their sympathetic tone, 
But die ere spoken, fail to play their part, 

And claim a merit that is not their own. 
The kindly word unspoken is a sin— 

A sin that wraps itself in purest guise, 
And tells the heart that, doubting, looks within. 

That not in speech, but thought, the virtue lies. 

But 'tis not so; another heart may thirst 

For that kind word, as Hagar in the wild — 
Poor banished Hagar!— prayed a well might burst 

From out the sand to save her parching child. 
And loving eyes that cannot see the mind 

Will watch the unexpected movement of the lips. 
Ah ! can you let its cutting silence wind 

Around that heart and scathe it like a whip? 

Unspoken words like treasure in a mine 

Are valueless until we give them birth; 
Like unfound gold their hidden beauties shine, 

"Which God has made to bless and gild the earth. 
How sad 't would be to see the Master's hand 

Strike glorious notes upon a voiceless lute ! 
But oh, what pain when at God's own command 

A heart-string thrills with kindness, but is mute ! 

Then hide it not, the music of the soul, 

Dear sympathy expressed with kindly voice, 
But let it like a shining river roll 

To desert dry— to hearts that would rejoice. 
O, let let the sympathy of kindly words 

Sound for the poor, the friendless and the weak, 
And He will bless you ! He who struck the chords 

Will strike another when in turn you seek. 



FLOTSAM AND JETSAM. 
It is an elementary scientific maxim that matter is indestructible. 
The postulate is more literally true than many of us suppose. It ap- 

Eears that even the carcasses of dead dogs and much other of the 
otsam and jetsam collected by a river during its passage through a 
great city can be turned to commercial account. Broni some details 
of the work of the rivageurs of the Seine we learn that an enormous 
number of dead dogs are annually fished out of that river as it leaves 
Paris, and sold to manufacturers. When his skin is in good condi- 
tion Ponto dead is worth, on an average, about nine cents. The skin 
goes to the tanner, while the fatty portions of the carcass are made 
into candles, and even into soap. The business done in derelict corks 
is even more important. Corks are taken from the Seine literally in 
thousands. When they are undamaged by wire fastenings or by the 
corkscrew a simple washing in a chemical solution suffices to fit them 
for the market; the damaged ones are cut down and sold to chemists 
and perfumers. Even small fragments of corks find a ready sale— at 
a very low price, of course— and they are used in the manufacture of 
of linoleum. But this is not all. The rivagear carefully puts aside 
the corks marked with the names of favorite brands of champagne 
and sells them to restaurant keepers, in whose hands their ultimate 
use may readily be divined. 

The McAfee Bros, announce that they will offer for sale, on next 
Monday, some two thousand acres (in blocks of from one to twenty 
acres), of the Palermo Citrus Tract. This land is located five miles 
south of Oroville, Butte County ; it is adjacent to the new town of 
Palermo, and on the line of the Northern California Railroad. At 
the same time there will also be offered a number of valuable build- 
ing lots in the town of Palermo. This is a sale which should attract 
wide-spread attention and be largely attended. Whether for specu- 
lative purposes or as an investment, or for homesteads, these lands 
are equallv desirable. The terms of the sale are, for citrus lands, one- 
fourth cash, balance in from one to four years at the option of the 
purchaser; for town lots, half cash, balance in from one to two 
years. 

For comfort, convenience, cleanliness and economy, the Indestructible 
Fuel and Fire Kindler has never had an equal since the world began. This 
unique article is made from infusorial earth, to which is added asbestos, 
clays and other materials. As a fuel the great advantage which this article 
possesses is the celerity and ease with which a fire can be made out of it, 
and the facility with which it can be utilized either for cooking or heating 
purposes. In families which do their own work the value of the Indestruct- 
ible Fuel and Fire Kindler cannot be overestimated. No kindling wood 
or coal need be used with it in order to make a fire, and it can be used 
in any ordinary stove. One number five kindler, saturated with oil, will 
burn for upwards of fifty minutes, and will cook an ordinary meal for six 
persons. The cost of this fire will be exactly one cent and a quarter. There 
is no danger attached to the use of these kindlers. Mr. Johu H. Donald, 
No. 769 Market street, is the General Agent for this fuel. 



" My dear fellow, delighted to meet you. Just the very man I 
wanted to see. I wish you would kindly lend me twenty dollars. 1 
unfortunately left my money at home and I haven't a cent on me." 
''I'm awfully sorry, old chap, but I haven't that amount about me 
just now. I can fix it though so that you can get it almost immedi- 
ately." "Ten thousand thanks, dear boy." "Here's ten cents. 
Take the street car and go home and get your money." 

— iVew York Truth. 

The largest diamond known is that one the syndicate in London 
offered to Jay Gould as an investment. It is not stated whether they 
bought it of a Summer resort hotel clerk or an end man in a minstrel 
troupe. 

Wm. H. Keith & Co. have bought the West End Pharmacy, cor- 
ner of McAllister and Fillmore, and will maintain it as a first-class 
drug store. Prescriptions carefully compounded. 



B^ZEsTIKIS- 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

DEUTSCHE SPIK A NIP LE1HMJK. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco. 

OFFICERS— President, L. GOTTTG. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Fred 

Koeding, F. Tillman, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Ign. 

Steinhart, A. E. Hecht, 0. Schoemann. Secretary, Geo. Lette. Attorneys, 

Jarboe & Harrison. May 14. 

SECURITY SAVINGTbANKT 

Guarantee Capital $300 000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in London — Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver t Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE 1,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR. JAS. C. FLOOD, JNO. W. MACKAY, 

R. H. FOLLIS, JOHN BIGELOW. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,000,000 

DIRECTORS: 

Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [Aug. 6. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. [Dec. 31. 



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Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
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A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 PINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. [Nov. 19 

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AT - LAW. 



HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR ■ 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 
Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 
Counterfeits and Imitations. 
411', CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco. April 17. 

|"~ I ■ PJ- » r\ C A natural product of the Finest 

Lclipse Lxtra Dry ?t^i s y .°' tiie<vorid - n °**»«°°°' 



.Ian. 7, 1888. 



SAN i kancisco NEWS LETTER 



i daring ilii- Dlneteentfa century, thai <-i Leland Btanford. " Don't 
: think." sjti.i a friend ■iterwaraa."that you rather lugged In Stan* 



TO ROT IN COLD OBSTRUCTION. 
.John Jacob, an antarprlalni American numbant, fonndor •>[ the 

■ 
(Jirabi kraerlcau phllanlhronlkt, «»» Iwjrn 

Pi v philauthropUt, wi« .1.-. , 

In a recent artielr the Nm I ktalogued along with the 

■ two >.-..rr more o! the " immortals " born to Christen- 
dom 

Ford's name, considering the company you put him in / " Perhaps 
-.-. perhape ■•<>; lit as see; perhaps there is some criterion by which 
tin- fitness ••! tin- epithet " logging in " can be tested some standard, 
wholly disinterested ami »>i authority, that cannot be gainsaid, which 
will -how whether or not Leland Btanford's name can be assured the 
eminence we assigned it. A- the Benator is an American, we shall 
be surer of our ground uT we appeal t" some foreign tribunal. The 
Judgment ol foreigners stands, in a measure! for that of posterity. 
Nov .i place in that magnificent publication, tin'" Encyclopaedia 
Britannlca, M la a very tolerable test of the eminence— and the sure 
eminence of a n<>u-Briton, at any rati-. Consulting its volumes, 
then, for the names of Americans whom posterity will refuse to for- 
Mt, we extract three (as good as thirt\ for our purpose) whose benc- 

mctions, noticeably small compared with Stanford's, have —till served 
to save them from oblivion. One of tin three was a member of the 
Kreat house of Baring, and we wondered whether mere commercial 
■■■■. however marked, could win recognition from the great En- 
cyclopaedia. Turning t" letter B, the name of Baring does not ap- 
pear. \\Y tried Rothschild. "Rothschild, the name of a Jewish 
family which has,'' etc Yes. Rothschild is the name of one of the 
powers of Europe— it la the name of a "family," much as Saxe- 
weimar or Tuscany used to be the name of a power, and stood for 
nobody in particular. The Nkws Lkttku's friendly monitor had gone 
on to say that "of course Governor Stanford is a very rich man" — 
jciously disclosing his own test of the Governor's preponder- 
ating title to distinction. There has never lacked amongst English- 
speaking folks a mob of rich — and of very rich— men. For example, 
in the peerage of England you have the <lrosvenors— Marquises and 
lnikes of Westminster j the Cavendishes (Devonshire), the Russells 
ord),the Rentincks (Portland), the Earls of Dudley, the Mar- 
quises ol Rote. Does posterity know aught of a soul of them— bar 
such as have distinguished themselves in 1'arliament, amongst them 
that Rule who was pilloried by the caricaturists? A mob of nobodies 
the rest — not one of them so well known as Alderman Roydell, who 
paid for the Shakspeare plates, or poor old Alderman Reckford, who 
is remembered by the freaks his son played with that vast wealth. 
No, there ta no help for it. A man who gets wealth together does a 
good thing in his time and generation, and, we must believe, enjoys 
it. Rut when he " steps down and out," that is the end of him, and 
of the memory of him. John Jacob Astor got much wealth, but the 
" Encyclopaedia Rritannica" (that is, posterity) had never heard of 
it. It hears of the Astor Library, and asks "who?" It hears of 
< tirard College, and asks " who?" It has heard nothing of Vander- 
hilt, nor Jstewart, nor John Garrett, nor Tomkins, nor Jackson, nor 
Raps (if there are any millionaires of these names), any more than it 
has heard of Raring. And it never will. But Stanford's name can- 
not die till the English tongue dies. 

The real sovereigns of mankind are commemorated by monuments 
erected by themselves. The Pyramids, the Taj-Mahal, the Escorial, 
We-trninster Abbey are the enduring monuments of real Sovereigns. 
St. Peter speaks for a Sovereign Church. In America v?e speak of 
the Sovereign People, and not always with unmixed respect. Where, 
then, is this Sovereign's monument— tangible and visible— erected by 
Himself? John Harvard was one of the people; Ezra Cornell was 
one of the people; Johns Hopkins was one of the same people; 
James Lick was one of this people; Leland Stanford is one of this 
Sovereign People, even as each one of us is also of the people. Si 
monwnentem qugsris. circumspice. It is not given to many individuals 
amongst the 'jO millions to add a turret or a wing to "the grandest 
monument that human Sovereign has yet erected to his own memory; 
but the monument is there—'* and there it will remain forever." The 
great globe itself may indeed dissolve leaving not a wrack behind, 
but until it shall, this vision, these cloud-capped towers, these palaces 
of mind and solemn temples of the soul shall endure — the Parthenon 
of Man. And in later ages later poets shall gratefully emulate the 
verse which for a century has played as a lambent light about " the 
distant spires, the antique towers * * where Science still adores " 
the memory of him who founded Eton. 

Kate Field says that the State Prisons of California are places of 
confinement, but nothing else that is deterrent or reformatory. They 
make no pretense to be anything else, and their lack of hypocrisy is, 
perhaps, their only good quality. Their officials are " on the make," 
and will continue to be. Our people are giving their time to money- 
making, and not to insisting on anything or anybody being reformed. 
The law-makers, law-breakers ana law-enforcers are a pretty badly 
mixed-up crowd in this State, and if they were all shaken up in a bag 
together, it is hard to say which would come out first. Some day, 
when our people get ready, they will insist upon these matters being 
differently regulated. 

The scheme for sending an exploring expedition to the South Pole, 
which originated in Australia some time ago, is in a fair way of being 
carried out at an early date. The Colonies agreed to pay one-half the 
expense, and asked the mother country to pay the other half. Lead- 
ing scientists in England have given the project " a boom," which is 
pretty sure to carry it forward to success. 

Here is an advertisement clipped from an English paper, that 
combines a religious lesson with a commercial suggestion: 

The Disestablishment of the Church.— What, after the spotless linen sur- 
plice, adds so much, to dignity of appearance in the pulpit as an exquisitely 
clean-shaven chin? Blank's magic strop and paste, established 50 years, 
insure perfection in shaving. Of all chemists, hairdressers and co-oper- 
ative stores. 



"ALEXANDRE" KID GLOVESI 



Havlngbean appointed 90U ITS In Ban Fraui-i.ro lor thi 

ih. Celebrated " Alexandre" Kid olove*, m kki plaaran In anoounolai 
•nan] public toil in t oomplata Hi i lore*, 

ol nil length*, ihadaa tod iltea, with plain ind embroidered i 

Thatti - ranlcaj tl rj flu. -si among nil oompetil 

public favor, is fully conceded, they being w.-ll mil favorably known 
throughout the country for years, as tho 

HIGHEST-CLASS KID GLOVE 

Bold I'V the late A. T. Stewart & Co., of New v,,rk. 

\\v rimlially invite close Inspection of these Excellent Oloven by the 
ladies ol this Coast, coufldcut that the Glove will wlu favor here, a* It 
always has, wherever known. 



Orders by Mail op Telephone Promptly Executed. 
Goods delivered free of carriage charges in Berkeley, Oakland, Ala- 
meda ami Fruitvale. 



— : 1 TELEPHONE No. 3240 I— 




MURPHY BUILDING, 
MARKET STREET, CORNER JONES, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

1ST O T_I O E. 

Sax Francisco, January 1. L888. 
Mr. Richard Delafield has this day retired from 
our house in San Francisco and New York, and 
-will hereafter act for us and sign as our attorney 
in New York; and Messrs. Delafield, Morgan, 
Kissell & Co. will represent us in the Eastern 
portion of the United States and Canada. Mr. 
Thomas B. MeGovern will sign for us as attorney 

in Chicago. 

Jan. 7. 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 



AMERICAN BISCUIT CO., 

801-815 Battery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



MANUFACTURE AN UNLIMITED VARIETY OF 

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[Oct. 22. 



RAHTJEN'S COMPOSITION 



IRON AND WOODEN SHIP BOTTOMS, 
Which protects them against Rust and Fouling, keeping their surface 
smooth and slippery for one year. — i,«wm« « 

E. W. TRAVERS, Agent, 



Dec. 3. J 



No. 10 Market Street. San Francisco. 



Eclipse Extra Dry 



: Finer than the class of Champag nes 
: sent from Fiance to this country, but 
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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 



*We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's.* 



—Tom Moore. 



The weekending to-day has been, without doubt, one of the dull- 
est in the history ot the theatres of Ban Francisco. There was not a 
novelty offered the public, beyond a change in the programme of the 
variety entertainment at the Bush-street Theatre. It is, therefore, 
not astonishing, the inclement weather being also considered, that 
light audiences are reported from every theatre. At the California 
Theatre, the Baldwin, the Alcazar, the Tivoli and the Orpheum, the 
programmes of the week were the same as those of the preceding 
weelc — Kiralfy's Dolores, O'Neill's Monte Cristo, The Romany Rye, A 
Trip to the Moon, and Satanclla. All things taken into consideration, 
the most attractive entertainment placed before theatre-goers is the 
Tivoli TWp to the Moon. It is very prettily staged. The costumes are 
new, the effects are well managed, the chorus girls are pretty and 
shapely, and the scenery, though badly painted, is effective. The 
snow scene is a very pretty idea. The Amazon March is actually 
novel in execution; and the transformation scene, which gladdens 
all the holiday theatre-goers, is resplendent with tinsel, red fire and 
incandescent lights. 

Carl Hertz will be remembered by many as a clever young ama- 
teur prestidigitateur, who amused his many friends with his legerde- 
main. He is now a skilled professional, with all the ease of manner 
and fluency of speech of his profession. He performs several clever 
tricks every evening at the Bush-street Theatre. Among them is the 
celebrated "bird-cage trick, first introduced here by Heller many years 
ago, and which is still, without doubt, the most startling illusion ever 
shown an audience by the disciples of Robert Houdin. The cocoon 
trick belongs to the newer school of elaborate tricks, in which the 
stage of a theatre plays an important part. It is a very pretty illu- 
sion, and battles scrutiny as to the "how" and "when" of it. We all 
know where the cocoon comes from, but bow does it come and when? 
These are the questions, and they are filling the Bush-street Theatre 
every night. 

♦ *#*■# 

At most of the theatres there will be a change next week. Kiralfy 
will revive Around the World in Eighty Days, out of which the rapid- 
ity of modern travel has knocked all the romance, and will make it 
spectacular with the aid of a live elephant. .lames O'Neill will im- 
personate An American Kings, play which was fairly successful in 
the East a few seasons ago. Ranch ifo. 10, a tale of frontier life, will 
follow the Romany Rye at the Alcazar. At the Orpheum ifatanella 
will retire for A Trip to Africa. There will be no change at the Tivoli, 
and the Howard Atnenamni Specialty Company will continue at the 
Bush-Street Theatre. 

» * * * * 

Campanini has announced that, if given a guaratee of thirty 
thousand dollars, he will return here in Spring, and with a strong 
company give complete representations of Grand Opera. He names 
among the members of the company he will bring, some of the best 
artists now in Italian opera. His repertoire, he says, will be a short 
one of three operas, but all of them novelties: Ponchielli's La Gio- 
coiula, Boito's Mejistojic and Verdi's Otello. If he really brings the 
artists he names and produces the operas he states, and in addition 
provides for the heating of the auditorium of the Grand Opera House 
to the proper temperature, he is sure to make the season a very profit- 
able one to him. It is reported that he has emitted an opinion on the 
lack of musical appreciation in San Francisco, based, of course, upon 
the comparative failure of his season. The sense ot this opinion may 
be imagined. His concerts, which were all remarkably attractive, 
could not be attended without complete sacrifice of comfort and 
positive danger to health. His abortive attempts to produce opera 
were unworthy of his artistic reputation. San Francisco has been too 
well treated in the matter of operatic performances to accept as such 
the representations given, last week, at the Grand Opera House. The 
singing of the principals was superb. Scalchi and Galassi, in La 
Favor'da, represented the supreme excellence of operatic art. The 
celebrated duet was sung by them as it to-day cannot be heard in any 
opera house in the world. Baldini's Fernando, in the same opera, 
indicated that this young singer, with study, may become a famous 
tenor. Nannetti's Balthazar w a ^dramatically sung. Elvire Kepetto 
sang Gilda, in Rigoletlo, cm amore, and exhibited her facility of vocal- 
ization at its best. But opera requires a chorus and an orchestra. 
And these alleged performances had neither. A few singers attempted 
to join in the concerted music and a few instrumentalists made a 
horrible mess of the accompaniments. Had these performances been 
successful, negative estimate of our taste in music, such as is ascribed 
to Campanini, would then have been warranted. It is to be hoped 
that the scheme for an opera season will be developed successfully. 
But it is an absolute necessity that provision should be made for the 
comfort of the audiences it is intended to attract to the Grand Opera 
House. Unless the owners of this unfortunate theatre attend to this, 
it will open its doors on still rarer occasions. Beaucleec. 

The Twelfth Night Reception given by the juveniles attending 
Mrs. Ada Clark's Dancing Academy, 211 Sutter street, which took 
place Friday evening, January 6th, was in every respect a most pro- 
nounced success. The Moor was crowded with beautifully dressed 
little fairies, who glided through the most artistic and difficult dances 
with such consummate grace and ease as to make one believe that 
their teacher, Mrs. Ada Clark, must hold an invisible wand over 
them. The audience was very enthusiastic, and everybody went 
away delighted with the evening's entertainment, and determined to 
attend the Oakland reception, which takes place on Friday evening, 
January 20th. 

Hoosf.kketkks who wish for something very superb iu the wav of a 
stimulant are recommended to try those flue old Whiskies distilled "hy H. 
& H. W, CatherwOOd, aud for which Messrs. Dicksou, DeWolf & Co. are the 
Pacific Coast agents. The iiavor of these Whiskies is something which is 
altogether unequaled, aud the fact thai they have maintained their reputa- 
tion in this market siuce 184y shows that they can always be relied upon. 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE.— Last Nights " Dolores." 

Ah. Hayman Lessee | Lewis Morrison Manager 

Under the Personal Direction of Mr. Al. Hayman. 

Every Evening (including Sunday). Saturday Matiuee. Second Week 
of the KIRALFY Seasou. Last Nights of the Superb Spectacular Produc- 
tion, 

DOLOBES. 

A Phenomenal Cast. Two Grand Ballets. Bolossy Kiralfy's Latest Crea- 
tion, "The Wild Gypsies " and " The Grand Dresdiua Ballet," by the entire 
Corps de Ballet. Including the World's Greatest Premier Dauseuses, BELLA, 
PARIS, NICODE. Secure your seats and avoid the crush. 

Prices— 25, 50, 75c, ?1, $1.50; Matinee— 25, 50, 75c, $1. 

Next Monday Evening, Jan. 9th— Kiralfy's 

-A-ZROTXILSriD THE "WOIR-LID IIEsT 80 ID-A-ITS. 
fJaa. 77] 



BALDWIN THEATRE — O'Neill. 

(THE LEADING THEATRE.) 
Al. Hayman Leasee and Manager 

This Evening, 1203d Night of "MONTE CRISTO." Every Evening (in- 
cluding Sunday]. Matinee Saturday. Second and Last Week but one of 
MR. JAMES O'NEILL. Last Nights of the Great Play, 

IM O DTST T IE CEISTOl 
With a Brilliant Cast! Elaborate New Scenery! Realistic Stage Pictures! 
Sunday Next, Jan. Sth— Last Night of " Monte Cristo." 

Next Monday Evening, Jan. 9th— First time here of MR. JAMES O'NEILL 
in the powerful and successful drama, 

-A-3ST .A-IMHEZRICA-ZTSr KIZTSTG- I 
Prices— Evening— 2oc, 50c, 75c, }1, J1.50; Matinee— 25c, 50c, 75c, |1. IJan 7. 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenkod, Osbourne & Stockwell, Managers— Geo. Wallenrod, Lessee 

This Evening at 8. Matineeat2. Last Week of the Romantic Spectacular 
Drama, entitled 

the E.03vc^.isnr ZEairzE i 

Illustrated by OSBOURNE and STOCKWELL and their Famous Company 
of Comedians. 



Popular Prices— 25e, 50c and 75c. 

NEXT-K^.3srcia: ioi 



(Jan. 7. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt Proprietor | Chas. P. Hall Manager 

Every Evening this Week. Matinee this Afternoon at 2. Brilliant Suc- 
cess of the New Programme! THE BOSTON HOWARD ATHEN.EUM 
SPECIALTY COMPANY. 30 Star Artists. Including the Wonderful MR 
CARL HERTZ, in his Great Sensation, "»«™rau am, 

"ie cocoisri" 

Assisted by the London Beauty, MLLE. D'ALTON. 
£B- Popular Prices. r Jan . 7 . 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Krbling Bros Sole Proprietors aud Managers 

Unprecedented Success! Crowded Houses Nightly! This evening and 
until further notice, Offenbach's Gorgeous Operatic Spectacle, 

_A_ TBIP TO TIHIIE IMZOOZTST I 

The Greatest Production ever seen in Sau Francisco. Tweuty-three 
Artistic Staire Pictures, endiug with a Dazzling Transformation Scene 
Wonderful Mechanical Effects. Beautiful and Rich Costumes. Ma"-uificeiit 
Appointments! Electric Illuminations! 150 Principal Artists" Graud 
Chorus, Orchestra aud Auxiliaries. The Auditorium and Stage illuminated 
by Edison's Incandescent Light, under the supervision of the Electric De- 
velopment Co., 323 Pine Street. 

OUR POPULAR PRICES-25 and 50 Cents. [j au . 7. 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE BASEBALL GROUNDS, 

End of Haight-street Cable Road. 

SATURDAY, Jan. 7th, at 2-.H0 o'clock p. M.- ST. LOUIS BROWNS vs 

HAVERLYS. 

SUNDAY, Jau. 8th, 11 o'clock a. M KEANES vs. HARDIES 

At 2 o'clock P. M NEW YORK GIANTS vs. ST. LOUIS BROWNS. 

Admission, 25 aud 10 cents. Ladies free on Saturday. Reserved seats on 
Sundays, 25 cents extra. 

Seats can be secured atGunst's Cigar Store, junction Market and O'Farrell 
streets, until 10 o'clock on day of game. f Jan. 7. 

RECALL WAR MEMORIES. 

The PANORAMA of the Famous Land and Naval 

B-A-TT'nL.ES OF VICKSBT7RG ! 
O pend aily from 9 A. M. to 11 P. M., corner Mason and Eddy streets. 

■- Balloons for the Children Every Saturday. [Jan. 7. 



GRAND PANORAMA! 

STORMING OF MISSIONARY RIDGE! LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN! CHAT- 
TANOOGA! Superb Battle Picture, admidst Magnificent Scenery. 

Open 9 a. M. to 11 p. M., daily, including Sundays, corner Market aud 
Tenth streets. 



Admission, 50c. Children half price. 



[Jan. 7. 



MRS. ADA CLARK'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

211 Sutter Street above Kearny 

HALL TO LET FOR BALLS, CLUBS ETC. I Aug. 1. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



II 



SPORTING. 



Some of the Directors <>f the Olvmpic t'iub are talking of arrang- 
ing another bloody mill like thai between Mohan and Avery. In 
other words, they want to drag the Club down t-» the level ol the 
Gulden 'late;* ami the others about the city. Club pride and Club 
jH.iicy should be sufficient to induce the Directors t-« let all saoh 
affairs aJone, for the organisation will soon start on the retrograde ii 
the lighters are given any substantial encouragement. The Olympic 
Club is, without question, the foremost athletic organization on the 
Pacific slope; Ita membership is drawn exclusively from the better 
classes; its social entertainments are well attended by reputable peo- 
ple, ami form no small part of the social features of the city. The 
rooms are splendidly equipped, and, in fact, every detail of the 
Club's affairs is complete. The Directors should realize that the Club 
with this standing has everything to lose and nothing to gain by per- 
mitting plug uglies to exhibit their hrute strength and their fistic 
skill in the rooms. If the toughs and their admirers are allowed 
inside, the reputable people will not be slow in going elsewhere. No 
one possessing the least sense of decency will desire to escort a lady 
to a ball or to one of the " Ladies' Night" exhibitions, when he 
knows that, perhaps, ou the previous evening the same room has 
been the scene of a fiendish, degrading, knockout tight. The knowl- 
edge that such an affair is about to come off will alao act as a deter- 
r.'iit. Let me ask vou, gentlemen of the Olympic Club, how many of 
you would be willing to take a lady to an exhibition of the Golden 
Gates, to which ladies are admitted? Not many of you would; in- 
deed. I believe that ninety percent, of the members would refuse an 
invitation to do so. But if you have a few more fights in your 
rooms, and the rough clement is allowed to have its way, your own club 
will find itself effectually hedged about by a similar social boycott. If 
boxing will not satisfy the more bloodthirsty members, let them find 
more congenial company with the Golden Gates and the Calif ornias, 
where tights are to be expected. The News Letter all along has corn- 
batted this policy on the part of the Olympic Club, and the folly of 
encouraging degrading exhibitions has been repeatedly pointed out. 
Whenever necessary the News Letter will continue in this course of 
action however distasteful it may be to the abettors of professional 
slugging matches. A little reflection will convince the Directors that 
they can afford to let others take the lead in giving disgraceful fights. 
***** 

The wrestling tournament, soon to come off, is giving rise to con- 
siderable discussion among the amateurs. That the Olympic Club 
has made a good stroke in arranging the contests cannot be ques- 
tioned, but there is still some doubt whether the best men will enter. 
Qua Ungerman, who is rated as the champion of his class, is inclined 
to hold off", saying that he already holds the championship trophy, 
and that the tournament will decide nothing. He will not enter un- 
less Tibbatts, of the Olympics, also goes in. Ungerman's desire to 
meet Tibbats is worthy of encouragement, but if that gentleman will 
not emerge from his seclusion, Ungerman has no reason to advance 
this as an explanation for not appearing himself. His determination 
to challenge the winner is laudable, but there is no occasion for it. 
Let him go in and be the winner himself, and for once let the ama- 
teur wrestling champions be known. 

* * * * * 

fSan Francisco does not seem to be a desirable location for profes- 
sional athletes. Professional fighters have no difficulty in getting 
along and in giving exhibitions in spite of the Mayor's virtuous reso- 
lution not to give permits to slog in public. William Miller, an ex 
cellent all around man, had to go East in search of the elusive shek- 
els, so much desired by individuals of that class. Harry Bethune. 
the sprinter, has lost money, because the gullible public has been 
warned of his presence. M. K. Kittleman had a similar reception. 
And now the word is that Duncan C. Ross and Patrick Walsh are ex- 
pected to drop in almost any day. These worthies have been hippo- 
droming with their mounted sword contests for the benefit of the 
Eastern sport and for the release of his dollars. They finally became 
stranded in some out of the way town in the South", and are said to 
be footing it hither. Walsh has a dozen aliases under which he 
fights, but Ross has stuck to his name all through. They will not be 
warmly received, except by their own little clique. 

***** 

A. H. Lean, the all around athlete, and H. I. Pritchard, the wrest- 
ler, are to wrestle for $500 a side, shortly, at the rooms of the Golden 
Gate Club. Lean has been defeated once by his lighter and more 
wiry opponent, and is not satisfied. The last exhibition of the Golden 
Gates, on Wednesday evening, was unusually good. The boxing 
lacked the gory features which have characterized the matches in the 
rooms of this organization in the past. 

* * * * * 
The Pacific Kennel Club has at last arranged and adopted a sched- 
ule of prizes to be awarded at the bench shows on the 5th, 6th, 7th 
and 8th of next April. About $875 in cash will be distributed besides 
diplomas. The club will hold the show in the Pavilion, and the 
rules of the American Kennel Club, excluding mongrels, will be ob- 
served. Treasurer Watson reports that the club has $347 48 on hand, 
and the amount to be awarded in prizes will be raised without much 
difficulty. 

***** 

The talk in baseball circles is the meeting of the St. Louis 
Browns, the champions of the American Association, and the 
New York Giants in a series of three games, to be played at 

the Haight street grounds, the first being played to-morrow. 

Opinions seem to be about evenly divided as to which of the two 

clubs— the Browns or the Giants— is the stronger. The California 

League carried out the two largest ventures ever undertaken in base- 
ball affairs on this coast; that is, at great expense bringing the New 
York Giants to this city and arranging a series of games between that 

club and the St. Louis Browns. The Phillies shut out tbe Browns 

at Central Park last Saturday without a run. They can thank the um- 
pire for it.— Hart and Central Park undertook to close up the Haight 



street grounds tin rhey fulled in their contract, and it 

lea would !>■■ turned. Hurt sn-ms to be antortu- 

Date in his statements to tin pre*a. In .-very Instance, recei 

has been succeesfuUy contradicted. Thi 

Phillies an-t Chicagoa now ni Central Park. Burns, Sullivan and 
HcGuire having gone home yesterday, while tie making 

preparations. Tie- California public will DOt forgel ll:irt»-\ rnuark 

that reputation with it amounted to nothing, and that it was not 
educated up to Brat-class baseball. He failed to rive tin- people that 

kind of ball, and he suffered financially for it. Heretofore li 

bad the monopoly of bringing out Bastern players everj Winter. 
There is another Richmond in the field in the person of Comlskey, of 
the Browns, who is thinking of bringing a nine with him her. 'this 
Winter. — The St. Louis Browns Bay they look to the California 
League to save them from financial wreck— thai as yet they have 

made no money. Knell, pitcher for the Keanes, has been offered 

eighty dollars a month to play with a Grass Valley club. If Hart 

goes away Pfcffer will remain here; if the former remains the latter 

Will go away. After all Hart had nocontract with the St. Louis 

Browns. Jim Corbett, the heavy weight boxer of the Olympic Club, 

will hereafter play center field for the Keanes .■ t irosby and Morgan, 
the former battery of the Pioneers, are now the battery for the Golden 

Rules. The Gala. League do not appear to make much noise, but in 

the language of the street phrase, "Tney get there all tbe same." 

When Mac heard the Browns had contracted to play the New Yorks 
at the Haight-street grounds, he automatically moved his head in the 
old, familiar perpendicular maimer, and mused the" League always 
gets the best of me— however, I would have taken the Giants away 

from them if I could." A local reporter who lost himself in his 

attempt to figure out the averages of last season, now goes by the 
soubriquet of the ''mental wreck." Powers came out here her- 
alded as the great Leage Umpire, then he dwindled down to an Asso- 
ciation Umpire. From the way heroasted the Browns whenever they 

played, one would be led to believe he is no umpire at all. Hart 

charged around like a howling Dervish, calling the Browns " con- 
tract-breakers." They proved they were not, and turned the tables 
on him by showing where he tried to havethem break a contract with 

Purcy before they came here. Hart boasts his ability to work the 

newspapers. During tbe last two weeks he has kept them contra- 
dicting the next day their statements of the previous day. Ten- 
thousand-dollar Kelly left here as surreptitiously as he arrived 

openly. He created a sensation both ways. If Kelly ever comes 

here again it will probably be us plain Mickey Kelly. Kelly is a > 

good in and out fielder, also a good catcher and base-runner, but 

an ordinary batter. The California League paid Kelly a bonus of 

five hundred dollars to .come here. His trip netted him nine hun- 
dred dollars. He said this was the speediest city he bad ever been 

in. This afternoon, weather permitting, the Browns, with Foutz 

and Latham as a backing, will play the Haverlys at the Haight- 
street grounds. As Lorrigun some time ago signed a contract with 

Finn, he will be found with the Pioneers next season. After the 

series between the Browns and Giants are concluded, the Los An- 
geles club will probably play three games with the local clubs at the 
Haight-street grounds, after which the grounds will be closed until 

April. Jim Fogarty, who came here with the Phillies and who is 

recognized as the greatest right-fielder in the profession, will play 
with the New Yorks in place of Kelly in the games against the 
Browns— Van Haltren as change-pitcher and center-fielder for the 
Giants. 

The most bbliale optician of the Pacific Coast, C. Muller, 135 Mont- 
gomery, near Bush street. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FOR BOYS 

1 ST. MATTHlW'S hall, S 

g CLASSICAL SCHOOL.l 

— : Under Military Discipline. — 

2a Special Attention and Advantages for Pitting Boys for a Scien- „ 

title or classical Course. «> 

B REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, PRINCIPAL. |§ 

TWENTY-TWO YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL WOEK ! 

EASTER TERM WILL OPEN JANUARY 8th. 

"PEOGEEDIElTTTTIv" 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR BOTH SEXES. 

1707 Powell Street, Between Union and Filbert. 

SPECIAL FRENCH CLASS daily, from 3:30 to 5 p. M. Courses of French 
and English ou Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from S to 9:30 p. »f. 
Circulars giving a full history of the Institute, its objects and terms, will 

b6 rr. e ee tt l O 0. aayaddrCS3UI "" ia|ir "" :a XAVM ! R MEFBET, Director. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

922 POST STREET. 
French German and English Day and Boarding School for Young Ladies 
and Children. KINDERGARTEN 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M., Pri ncit>als 
Sept. 10.] MISS MARY LAKE, j rrmeipais. 

^MME. WALDO-COHEN^ 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 

1215 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eclipse Extra Dry I 



The Higbest Grade Champagne. 
Equal to the Best. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 



1888. 



HARBOR DEFENSES. 
It is no doubt desirable that a great harbor like that of San Fran- 
cisco should be protected by defenses equal to the task of resisting 
the attacks of any possible foe, but desirable as that condition of things 
is, it is by no means certain that it is possible of accomplishment. 
The rivalry between the attacking force of guns and the resisting 
power of fortresses has not yet reached a final determination. Up 
to date the guns appear to be ahead. If means can be discovered by 
which dynamite can be safely fired from cannon— and that is an ex- 
treme probability in the very near future— it is very certain that the 
guns would become too much* for any fortifications that are likely to be 
built at this period. A daily contemporary that is just now busy advo- 
cating an immediate and vast expenditure for forts at the entrance of 
our bay, does so on the ground that whereas the present arrange- 
ments at Fort Point and Alcatraz were altogether admirable in their 
day, they are now out of date and would be utterly powerless to re- 
sist the attacks of even second-class ships of war like* the Triumph and 
.the Duauesne, which have recently been riding at peace on the waters 
of San Francisco's harbor. But what evidence is there that any forti- 
fications built now would not be equally out of date within a very 
few short years? The indications are pretty plain that they would 
be. The truth is that there is an irrepressible conflict going on as to 
the superiority of attacking and resisting forces that is very far from 
being determined, and until it is the chances are that fortifications of 
any Known character are likely to prove much more dangerous to 
those who occupy them than to those who attack. The wnole sub- 
ject of harbor defenses is in a condition of incertitude. It is no 
secret that the great war-studying powers of Europe have for the 
time being practically abandoned all confidence in ana reliance upon 
their land fortifications. The easy way in which the guns of the 
Inflexible disposed of the forts of Alexandria, without receiving mate- 
rial damage nerself, demonstrated that which had already come to be 
well understood, namely, that stationary fortifications on land are 
nowhere as against the well-directed fire of moving ironclads at sea. 
It has long-since been deemed useless to spend more money in further 
strengthening even the great fortresses at Cronstadt, Cherbourg and 
Portsmouth, and now the powers interested are more concerned as to 
how they shall successfully defend their defenses. To accomplish 
that end great ironclads are the order of the day. In addition, very 
costly torpedo services are being created and maintained, although 
their utility is in doubt, and at this time is being warmly disputed 
by men of authority. Until tested in actual warfare, the value 
of torpedo defenses is an unknown quantity. In this condition of 
affairs it will be well for this country to think twice before it commits 
itself to a vast expenditure on harbor defense works, the efficiency 
of which it is not possible at present to determine. Happily, we 
have no strong and avaricious neighbors bent upon seizing any of our 
territory, nor does there anywhere appear a difficulty likely to in- 
volve the United States in war. Our best fortifications consist in 
cultivating just, friendly and mutually beneficial relations with all 
the world. It is our good fortune to have no foreign entanglements, 
and we want none. We have no foes, and seek none. Though we 
have no standing army, and no navy worthy of the name, we are 
stronger, because inciting nobody to an attack, than are the nations 
which are spending untold millions on both. If they were as unpre- 
pared for aggressive warfare as are the United States, they would ex- 
cite nobody's fears, and their peace, like ours, would be assured. If 
each of our great ports were a Cronstadt, and our navy equal to that 
of England, the chances are that the officials would involve this peo- 
ple in war because of the plunder there would be in it. 

WORK FOR THE GRAND JURY. 

If the Grand Jury really be as intent upon finding good and useful 
work to do as it assumes to be, it need not travel far afield in search 
of it. It would be doing a most excellent service, if it would inquire 
into the happenings during the regime of the notorious Buckley- 
Toohy-Burns Grand Jury, and inform the public authoritatively of 
the facts. Enough is known on the outside to render it very certain 
that a complete revelation of the true inwardness of things during 
that period would be exceedingly interesting as well as profitable. 
There was a general telling of things that it would be well to know. 
The Police Department was put under a hot fire — so hot, in fact, that 
it could not stand it, and took water in order to cool itself. Over 
ninety witnesses were examined as to its crookedness, and founda- 
tions "were laid for some fifteen indictments against leading officers 
of the department. There could be no doubt about the serious char- 
acter of the allegations then made, for Chief Crowley cried like a 
child, and humbled himself in the dust before the '''Blind White 
Devil." and beseeched him " for God's sake to let up." A meeting 
took place between the pair at a leading attorney's office, and pre- 
sumably a treaty offensive and defensive was entered upon, for there- 
after the Grand Jury was '-hauled off," the investigation was stopped, 
and the indictments were not found. The Boss boasted to his lambs, 
" I've downed 'em, boys," and it looks as if he had. judging from the 
immunity extended to his vagrants ever since. Burns and Spotts 
were respectively the foreman and secretary of that Grand Jury, and 
they were rewarded by the public offices which they now hold. The 
negotiations necessarily took place outside of the Grand Jury room, 
and therefore may be inquired into. If corrupt bargains were made, 
the facts may be investigated. If felonies were agreed to be condoned 
and were condoned, the condoners mav be indicted, even though 
they be Grand Jurymen. The names of the ninety witnesses ought 
to be on record. Why not subpoena them to tell their stories over 
again? If the Grand Inquest of the country can be swerved from its 
duty and corrupted, the fact ought to be made known. If foreman 
Chas. R. Story and his colleagues mean business they can find any 
amount of it at the bottom of this matter. 



Senator Sherman says that instead of a surplus being a danger, it 
is evidence that the people are exceedingly prosperous and able to 
pay. Of course it is. In the same sense a gorged leech is evidence 
that its victim has plenty of blood in his body, and is in no immedi- 
ate danger. But how long would he remain in that condition if the 
leeching process were continued? 



STOPPING THE HABEAS CORPUS MULL. 

It is one thing to sue out a writ of habeas corpus and quite another 
to make a proper return to it. The issuance of such a writ, when 
sued for upon a properly verified showing, cannot be denied to any 
man or woman within the jurisdiction of the United States, but when 
the return alleges and the evidence proves that the person is either 
not restrained of his or her liberty at all, or, being restrained, he or 
she is held by due process of law, there is nothing for the court to do 
but dismiss the writ, and that is precisely what the Federal Judges in 
this city ought to have done in every one of the Chinese cases in 
which prior residence was claimed, but no Custom House certificate 
produced. On the showing that the petitioners were refused a land- 
ing by the Collector, under the authority of the Restriction Act, the 
writs ought to have been dismissed and the petitioners sent back to 
the vessels from which they were taken. The truth of the matter is 
that there has been nothing but pure cussedness all round in regard 
to this business. Collector Hager either could not or would not un- 
derstand his duty in the premises. He should have at first made a 
proper return to the writs, and upon being defeated should have 
taken an immediate appeal, which, in the matter of a writ of habeas 
corpus, could have been pressed to an early hearing and determina- 
tion. The whole dispute could have been put an end to within a few 
weeks; instead of which he contented himself by denying the right 
of the courts to issue the writs at all, about which right there was no 
manner of doubt. The Judges, on the other hand, persisted in hear- 
ing oral evidence, when the law said that the Custom House certifi- 
cate was the only permissible testimony. They persistently ignored 
the law, and issued and decided writs with astonishing assiduity. 
People generally believe that they did so because there were enor- 
mous fees in the business for their relatives. If that belief be well 
founded, somebody ought to be impeached. Attorney-General Gar- 
land's brief in the case of Jung Ah Lung makes the law plain, and 
shows how easily Collector Hager might have had this whole matter 
determined two years ago. It is a scandal and a shame to all con- 
cerned that matters were permitted to proceed to the lengths they did. 

THE TARIFF ISSUE. 
It is lamentable, but it is true, that there is more of buncombe and 
humbug being written about the very simple tariff issue which the 
President has submitted to Congress than ever before bedeviled so 
matter of fact a difficulty. The boiled down essence of the whole 
matter can be given in a few sentences. More taxes are being ex- 
tracted from the pockets of the people than the necessities of the 
Government call for. At the end of the present fiscal year the esti- 
mated surplus will be $140,000,000. That is an enormous sum to with- 
draw from the purposes of trade and commerce. To extort it un- 
necessarily from the people is robbery. To lock it up in the treasury 
is an outrage upon business. To spend it upon objects not immedi- 
ately demanded by the country is wicked extravagance, which is sure 
to lead to shocking corruption and the manifold ills that follow in its 
wake. Neither political party will dare to commit itself to levying 
more taxes than the necessities of the Government, economically ad- 
ministered, call for. That being so, both parties will stand pledged 
to the reduction of taxation to the extent of the overplus. That much 
is admitted all round. There is no difference upon any question of 
principle. All that remains is a mere matter of expediency. The 
question, and the only question to be considered, is as to how the re- 
duction can best be effected. On any differences that may arise out 
of that question there is no room for a great national party to stand. 
Those differences will be local and selfish and not national and 
patriotic. Pennsylvania wants the duty on coal retained, Ohio in- 
sists upon the 'wool duties being maintained as they are, Louisiana 
objects to sugar being put upon the free list, and so on all along the 
line. Congressmen will divide upon these matters in accordance with 
the interests of their localities, and not upon party lines. The result 
will be compromises, which will not all be wise ones. Meanwhile, the 
President's suggestions hold the field. It is hard to suggest anything 
wiser than the cheapening of raw material, which is so essential to 
cheap home manufactures. It is idle-to call Cleveland a free-trader 
when that is the kind of protectionist he is. 

SUGAR DUTIES VS. SUGAR BOUNTIES. 
The placing of sugar on the free list would at once get rid of 
$40,000,000 of the annual surplus. It would give every man a cheap 
breakfast table, and, above all, it would greatly lessen the price of a 
raw material which enters largely into the canning industries in re- 
gard to which California entertains such large expectations. Free 
sugar means protection to a class that it is difficult to otherwise pro- 
tect — the fruit-growers. If home-made sugar must be protected, 
that can be done in another way. The example of France and Ger- 
many can be copied, and bounties paid. If sugar manufacturing be 
an indispensable industry for a country to encourage, that can be 
done more effectually and' at less cost by direct rathtr than by indi- 
rect payment. Napbleon I. determined that France should grow its 
own sugar, and to enable it to do so he established a system of boun- 
ties. The experiment was so great a success that Germany, many 
years later, imitated his example, and now the production of sugar 
from beets is one of the foremost industries of those mighty em- 
pires. In the production of sugar Germany now leads all other 
nations; her product in 1885 (which was greatly increased in 1880) 
was $190,000,000. France follows some distance after with an annual 
product of $90,000,000. When bounties were first offered there was 
not a pound of sugar produced in either country. In Germany and 
France the lands are dear and exhausted, and require constant ma- 
nuering. In the United States they are cheap, and, in many of the 
States the rich and deep soils are practically inexhaustible. The 
growth of beets and production of sugar ought to be among the 
great industries of this country. If bounties are necessary to that 
end it would be better to pay them, as France and Germany do, than 
to continue a system which "makes sugar artificially dear arid has not 
encouraged its production to any extent. That would be a truly pro- 
tective system which would encourage the manufacturers who use 
sugar, and the growers and producers of it, at one and the same time. 



Jan. 7, 1S8S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



18 



TOWN CRIER. 



" Heir the Crier!" "What the devil art thou?" 
"One that will play the devil, Ur, with yon." 



"Year after year the one* cherished amusement of the San Fran- 
Duth making New Year's calls is Falling deeper into neglect, 
But, by the Foam ol the tffogg bowl, there is Iota of tun to be culled 
in that same custom. On that day of legitimate intoxication, when 
no n i ;u i mail honestly be called a brute for steeping hia nozzle in the 
drink, the Ban Francisco maiden waa beheld at her beet. Like a 
heroic statue she stood, from jocund morning to dewy eve. bidding 
the gorgeous youth to sucking pig, cheering blm on to turkey, and 
inviting him to sample the parents' best New Year's whisky. His 
breath dJamayt '1 her not, and she Found gems ol humor in hi* high- 
i Lncoherency. Hia lisp was the language of Courts, and his 
hiccough even a^ the cooing ol the turtle dove, tor the day sanctified 
all dissipation. Bis war whoop, when his companions bundled him 
into the haok, excited no derision, For the victim of hospitality was a 
sacred trust. 1 have a dim recollection ol a quarter of a century 
back, when even I was young, calling on New Year's Day upon the 
da ugh ten of a crave and ascetic clergyman. Though 1 felt the 
liquids taken in during a long pilgrimage swashing my back teeth, I 
nerved myself for a magnificent brace, Looked sad, said but little, 
waved strung drink away with an indignant wave, and greeted lernon- 
ade with a cordial smile. All went beautifully until the end, when, 
backing out after the fashion of the court of St. James, I fell over a 
piano stool. That settled me. That fatal joggle stirred up the fumes. 
I was paralyzed, ami the shocked and startled clergyman and his in- 
teresting family almost dislocated their arms getting me on my feet. 
I have never made a New Year's call since. 

Oh dear, little Larry, 

Too bad you should marry, 
And all your sweet glances bestow upon one, 

For, by the dark river, 

I swear I have never 
Met maid half so winsome, so brimful of fun. 

For life is so dreary, 

So irksome and weary, 
The smiles that can brighten its thorn-strewn track 

Should be generally given, 

As soft beams from heaven, 
So their sunshine may lighten each wayfarer's pack. 

So fairly, dear Larrv, 

Frank can't say to Harry, 
" She danced with me, talked with me, likes me the best; " 

Or Dick whisper to "Will v, 
" Now don't think I'm silly. 
Because Larry, for my sake, would cut all the rest." 
Though the dailies are all ahead of me in shedding tears over the 
departure of Mrs. Yznaga, I want to drop a few drops over that de- 
plorable event. I do not know or care whether society will ever re- 
cuperate. I know, for my own part, that life to me has been a blank 
since Mrs. Yznaga departed. Apart from the superior attractions of 
the lady herself, I liked the name. When a mere boy, I was cast 
away on the coast of Borneo, and then I learned to love Iguana. 
Now, I want it clearly understood that if the dailies had not turned 
on the faucets of their woe at the departure of this fascinating lady, 
I would not have whimpered. I have talked with hours to her about 
her divorce, and by gad if old Y'znaga's ears did not tingle, it was not 
my fault. He is a cur, and I told Mrs. Y. my opinion, which much 
contributed to my solidity. Lord, how she could play tennis. 
Heavens, may I never lead another german, if her dancing was not 
the very essence of the peotrv of motion. The Examiner says that 
the Union Club men used to drink champagne in her room. That is 
a mistake. I was the club man. The Chronicle hints that all this 
divorce trouble has arisen because Len (her husband) made love to 
Mrs. Y'.'s pretty maid. Holy smoke, if Mrs. T. C. could have ob- 
served how I made the running with that little daisy, there would 
have been a thundering sensation in town. But Mrs. Yznaga is gone, 
after getting " a splendid send-off in the papers." I wonder if she 
liked it. I hope not. I am bitterly disappointed in her if this vulgar 
slobber pleased her. 

Though the moral law makes no distinction, yet no man's con- 
science ever yet jarred him for telling a lie to his wife. But the 
domestic field is limited. It is a narrow field, and the bride of a 
year, unless, indeed, her husband be a rarely gifted man, has been 
all over the ground and knows all the dear old forms: "Sitting up 
with a friend." O, venerable chestnut, what noble duty thou hast 
done in the past; "Detained by important business at the office." 
Blessings on thee, true friend of married life— thy shoulders are cal- 
lous from the weight of many a burden. A few nights ago a sad 
evidence of the fatal result of poorly planned and inartistic lying 
came to my notice. Tom, who lives within a few blocks of John, 
told his wife that he was going to a bachelor party at John's. At the 
same time John, by a wretched coincidence, told his wife that he was 
going to a bachelor party at Tom's. John returned home at 3 a. m., 
and Tom at about 4 a. m. ; and the next day Mrs. Tom called upon 
Mrs. John to hear the details of the party. When Mrs. Tom insisted 
that her husband had been at Mrs. John's, and Mrs. John protested 
that her husband had gone to Mrs. Tom's, there was the deuce to 
pay. The eyes of both poor deceived women were pried wide open, 
and it will be slippers and paper before the hearth for Tom and J ohn 
for many a night to come. 

If the messenger boy strike will but lead to a new race of Mer- 
curys, then indeed is the agitation a boon to this city. The San Fran- 
cisco messenger boy, with some few honorable exceptions, is an idle, 
lazy, unreliable, extortionate, pitch and tossing sloth, who is exorbi- 
tantly paid for a very poorly rendered service. I hope that, as this 
strike is ostensibly in the cause of their mothers, those dames will 
utilize their sons 1 unattached time by basting them into something 
like usefulness. 



Th" San Francisco reporter la, In my opinion, a gi 

Ing, enterprising, hard-working fellow. Be da up his 
luiteaawell astbebesi ..f bia Eastern brethren, and be 
mil face the mnaale of a club In the discharge oFhlsdutj I 
Im- does not like to be! upon by Imported 

id- ( h\ 'lit up. the other day, five unit 

and assorted From the' bicago press, the soul ol the □ 
waxed wroth, and the Chicago men were not greeted with the 
diality which la so Calif ornlan. Though the new men 

wore each upon his bosom the legend, "Notiiea on i 
timers pcr-i-ted in declaring that they lacked Fn 
no effort to smooth their wav. Therefore, when a no-fly mai 
-cut to report a meeting at the Citj Hall, and inquired of the aon ol 
the Golden West th< that building, he was politely dl 

to the Oakland ferry, lie was instructed that the police static 
to be Found at the Mission I>.>lwr< s, and that Ihe Receiving Hospital 
stands at the .suburbs of Butchertown. Confusion, din- confusion 
and empty note-books is the result, while Professor Klvun. the artist- 
rss ;i _\ ist . has been detailed to give the new contingent evening le 
In the topography of Ban Francisco, and to impress them with the 
fact that >eliiy's shot tower is not at the entrance of Golden 
Park, nor Mark Borack archbishop of this diocese. 

The day wherein I read not of Deputy t'nited States' on 
Joseph l». Redding in some paper is to me a blank, There is no CaU- 

fornian who does not glory in hearing of Mr. Kedding in the paper 
when he goes to Oakland and the Oakland interviewer waits on him, 
when he gets to Chico and the Chico man writes him up. and so on 
through all his triumphal progress East. Therefore, when I saw that 
he had corralled— "no, I mean that the Eastern interviewer had cor- 
ralled him on the lobster uuestion— I was glad. I have a lively re- 
membrance of that lobster business. I mind me of the time when 
Charley Josselyn went about and collected a lot of money for the im- 
portation of the Eastern lobster, and when one evening he most in- 
cautiously disclosed the fact to Deputy United States Commissioner 
Joseph I>. Redding. And lo and behold, twenty-four hours after- 
wards a reporter waited upon Mr. Kedding, and the result was, of 
course, an interview. And this newspaper article disclosed the fact 
that Mr. Redding was working tooth and toe nail for the introduc- 
tion of the Eastern lobster, and was appealing to the purses of all 
epicures. In the tail end of the interview was a line that one Mr. 
Josselyn agreed with Mr. Redding that the lobster should be culti- 
vated in California waters. 

With a pair of English shoes, 

And a club as big as a tree, 

With a cold in his head and a cold in his nose, 

And bunions and corns and aching toes, 

And thorns and mud on his woolen hose, 

And his shins scarred with many a bruise, 

The last of the dawn-snatchers tottered along 

Singing the season's farewell song. 
" If stolen kisses are sweet, how sweet is the milk in the morning, 
When the dreamy sluggard who owns the can heeds not the watch- 
dog's warning. 
If bread won by honest toil is toothsome and good and nutritious, 
The loaf from the door-step snatched is more supremely deficious. 
But the wintry rains have come, and the early dawns are over, 
And the Club "beholds the sun from under the* blanket's cover, 
And milk-can and bread are safe, and the Club's beloved caper, 
Of bearing away in glee the slumberer's morning paper, 
Or culling his choicest buds, will go over till next season. 
With the clubs and the heavy shirts, and the boots with the winter 

grease on." 
Like a ghost he faded away and his breath on the fresh breeze borne. 
Suggested a cure for grief in the shape of an early horn. 

Snow is a pretty thing to look at from afar, but it plays the deuce 
with the noses of the ladies. There can be no sentiment with a girl 
who carries a red light between her eyes, no matter how melting and 
beautiful those eyes may be. It is the next thing to sea-sickness, and 
when sea-sickness comes into the bridal berth, Cupid goes flying out 
the port, and does not venture to come on board again until the bride 
is well enough to eat four meals a day. Kissing a lady in this weather, 
who has been exposed to the icy wind, is like embracing a stalactite. 
Tb^e nose, besides being terriby chilling, is damp— unpleasantly damp 
— and to have recourse to one's handkerchief after a chaste salute is 
a most discourteous proceeding. Therefore, women who have any 
regard for their good looks should keep indoors and nurse their noses, 
steaming them carefully at the kettle spout immediately after being 
exposed to a draft. 

Said Strephon to Phyllis, 

" When the gutter you tripped over, 
My heart was 'neath your feet, love, 

The heart of your true lover ; 
I wished I were the cobble-stones 

Your tiny bottines pressed, love; 
I longed to be the curbing 

Your muddy soles caressed. love;| 
My pulses thrilled. I marked the time." 

Quoth pretty Phyllis, mocking, 
*' Pray, how? M " Said naughty Strephon, 
" By the clocks upon your stocking." 

The good old series of umbrella literature, so long inseparable from 
ourwriters.has been most unaccountably delayed this season. I have 
never yet met a man, no matter how dull, who was not up to the 
standard of making a joke about an umbrella. Something he had 
read about taking an umbrella from a church door, or a rack, or a 
street car, was sure to occur to him, suggested by the clammj 1 - touch 
of his own gingham. Perhaps this is because it is the only species of 
larceny which may be indulged in with impunity. And why I do not 
know. Men who would scorn dishonesty in any other line will not 
scruple to go through the umbrella evolution,' beginning at a four- 
bitter, and illegitimately swopping and swopping until the climax of 
the five dollar silk was attained. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



THE REAL PROPERTY MARKET. 

The New Year begins with the promise of numerous auction sales. 
N< arly all the prominent firms are reported as arranging an event of 
this kind, a sure sign that the holidays have thrown upon their hands 
time not otherwise engaged. They evidently have customers who 
are willing to risk the fortunes of the auction room, in the belief that 
buyers retain their readiness to invest under the hammer. The 
properties to be ottered include city as well as country property. As 
to the latter it cannot have escaped careful observers that the local 
offices are taking more and more to dealings in country property— 
not in the flaring " red dodger " way that characterized the attempt 
to create excitement during last August, but by making exhibits of 
farm and garden product*. A larger number of offices seem now al- 
most exclusively devoted to dealing in farming and horticultural 
lands located in all parts of the State, and evidently the business 
seems to he firmly established as one of the branches of San Fran- 
cisco's real estate market. The logical inference, of course, follows 
that the buyers are here, and here in numbers. Perhaps, havinggot 
used to seeing them in numbers, their presence is no longer a matter of 
notice, and but for the energetic and bustling real estate men they 
would probably (Jo their bargains elsewhere. No sign could be more 
encouraging than this. It makes San Francisco what it ought to be — 
the central point of real estate operations. Of course the expecta- 
tions of all concerning the prospects of the trade in orchard and 
farm lands in the bay counties are high, for there has been a great 
influx of Eastern land-seekers. Almost every day come reports of 
agents looking for locations, who represent societies and colonies of 
people anxious to locate in this land of promise. 

The market for city property will soon be put to a severe test in the 
way of having it redeem the promises which it is supposed to have 
held out. The general expectation is that it will breaK into activity 
at once, and will continue during the entire year. Yet, from appear- 
ances, it does not seem as if the market will move in any particular 
direction, or that any kind or class of property will be especially 
favored. It looks rather as if there were a general and gradual en- 
largement of the circle within which property will be found to be 
readily marketable. Nevertheless, it must be ad nutted that the so- 
called outside lands— that is, those south of the Park— have shown a 
significant improvement during the past three months, and that the 
market for them is now firmer than it was supposed it ever -would be 
again after the fiasco of the speculators' combination. It is quite 
likely that business in these will further improve as the year ad- 
vances. 

Then, again, the Potrero and South San Francisco show promise 
of reviving, and. so there may be opened here a field for enterprise 
which has lain fallow for many a year. Fnaily, there is. the 
North Beach, long neglected also, butnever much depressed or other- 
wise effected by the neglect. Even here the new year holds out some 
promise, for the northern portion of the town is about to profit by 
the extension of the cable-railroad system, and an inquiry after con- 
veniently located property is almost sure to follow. Even now sales 
are more frequent than" they have been. For instance, during the 
past week this part of the town is represented as follows: 22x130 on 
the south side of Jackson, 199 feet west of Powell street; 48x76 on 
the southeast corner of Hyde and Vallejo; 25x120 on the south side 
of Union street. 137 :6 east of Leavenworth: and 67:6x137:6 on the 
north side of Chestnut street, 70 feet west of Powell, $9,000. 

In Western Addition properties there has been a fair movement 
during the holidays. Among the sales were: -17x110 on the west side 
of Scott street, 30:8 feet south of Washington, .$10,900; 50x106:3 on 
the southwest corner of 0.ak and Pierce streets; 30x100 on the east 
side of Van Ness avenue, 90 feet north of Turk street, $8,000; 50x127:8 
on the south side of Washington-street, 106:3 feet east of Steiner,$12,- 
000; 137:6x137:6 on the northwest corner of Pine and Devisadero 
streets; and' 50x110 on the east side of Gough street, 52:8 feet north 
of Clay street. In the purchase of Western Addition property, as in- 
deed in the purchase of all property in localities where old ponds and 
pools have been filled in.it is very advisable to investigate the ma- 
terial with which such filling in has been done. In a recent instance, 
where a natural basin in an otherwise healthy locality had been rilled 
with garhnge in the good, old and devil-may-care days, and elegant 
residences had been erected thereon, it was found that the locality is 
absolutely uninhabitable. Unfortunately, the discovery was not 
made until a number of people living on the spot had died of typhoid, 
diphtheria and kindred diseases. 

in the Mission business is momentarily moderate. Recent sales 
include 30x122:6 on the east side of Mission street, 185 feet south of 
Twentieth ; 55x89 A on the Northeast corner of Valencia and Twenty- 
first street; 50:10 by 114 on the southwest corner of Twenty-sixth 
and Castro streets; and 45:9x137:6 on the south side of Mission, 45:6 
west of Twelfth street. There is an inclination to pay a little more 
attention to property situated east of Mission street, on account of 
the proposed railroad improvements on Howard street. Until, how- 
ever, something definite is announced, it is. hardly probable that the 
market will be materially affected. 

In down-town properties, the leading sale was that of 45:8x59:9 on 
the north side of Sacramento street, 481 :8 feet east of Drumm, for 
$30,000. This figure is considered an exceedingly satisfactory one. 

South of Market street there were sales of 50x100 on the north side 
of Townsend street, 80 feet west of Second, for $6,000; and 25x90 on 
the south side of Harrison street, 325 feet east of Third. 

In Chinatown there was a sale of 28:4x68:9 on the south side of 
Sacramento, 109:2 feet west of Dupont, for $7,000. 

Blaine's Tariff programme has alieuated some of his best sup- 
porters in the press. Among the number are the Chicago Tribune, 
the St. Louis Globs-Democrat, the Providence Journal, the Philadel- 
phia American, the Milwaukee Sentinel, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and 
the Omaha Bee. The warnings of these papers will make curious 
reading during the next campaign if Blaine is the Republican can- 
didate. 

When David hooked the King's spear in the cave he wished mere- 
ly to prove to him his love, that Saul. —Duluth Paragraphs: 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 18S7, the Board of Directors of 
The German Savings and Loan Society has declared a Dividend at the 
rate of four and oue-half f4J£) per ceut. per annum on Term Deposits and 
three and three-fourths (?$i) per ceut. per annum on ordinary deposits, and 
payable on and after TUESDAY, the 3d day of January, 1888. 

Dec. 31. J By order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND~NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Northwest Corner Powell and Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1887, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and oue-half MV£) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, 
and three and three-fourths (3%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after TUESDAY, January 3, 1888. 
Dec. 31.1 VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

"DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Frarieiseo Savings Union. 
532 California street, corner Webb. 
For the half year eudiug with 31st December, 1887, a Dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four and thirty-two oue-hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, 
per annum on Term Deposits, and three and sixty onehuudredths (3 00-100) 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and 
after Tuesday, 3d January, 1888. 
Dec. 24.] LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

San Francisco, January 4, 1888. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directorsof this Society, held this 

day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of %$i per cent, per annum on 

all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1887, free of all taxes, 

and pavable from and after this date. 

Jan. 7. 1 . ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Office of the Con. California and Virginia Mining Company, 

San Francisco, January 3, 1888. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, held 
this day, dividend No. 13 of fifty cents (50c) per share was declared, payable 
on TUESDAY, January 10, 1888. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 28 Nevada Block, No. 309, Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. [Jan. 7. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Eureka Consolidated Mining Company, 

December i)8, 1887. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held this day, at the Office of the 
above Company, 306 Pine street, San Franciseo, a Dividend (No. 80) of 
Twenty-five Cents (25c.) per share was declared upon the capital stock of 
the above Company, payable MONDAY, January 9, 18S8. Transfer books 
will be closed Saturday, December 31, 1887, at 12 m. 

H. R. P. HUTTON, Secretary. 
Note. — Dividend on stock issued in New York since May 1, 1884, payable 
at the office of C. E. Laidlaw, 14 Wall street, New York. I Dec. 31. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Crocker Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, room No. 26, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 16th Day of January. 1888, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of- such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, December 2t;th,at 3 o'clock 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 



ing, 
p. M. 
Office— Room 



[Jan. 7. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation. 
The annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Anglo-Nevada Assurance 
Corporation will be held at the office of the corporation. No. 410 Pine street, 
San Francisco, Cal., on 

Monday, the 9th day of January. 1888, at the hour of 3 P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, 
and for the transaction of such other business as may lawfully come before 
the meeting. [Dee. 31.1 LOUIS SLOSS, President. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Mining Company. * 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 57, Nevada Block, 
No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 18th Day of January, 1888, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M, 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, January 16, 1888. 

E L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 57, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 7. 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company of San Francisco, California, will be held at the Com- 
pany's office, 401 California street, in the City of San Francisco, on 

Tuesday, January 10, 1888, between the hours of 12 M. and 4 P. M., 
Forthe election of eleven Directors to serve during the ensuing year, and 
the transaction of such other business as may properly come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will be closed on the 4th of January. 

Dec. 81.1 WM. J. DUTTON, Secretary. 



Artotype 9 



With. :S. F\ Mews Letter, Jan. 7th, 1888. 




BWTTO* & HEY ARTD. 



:: - 



ARTISTIC HOMES OF CALIFORNIA, 



Residence of NIr. LYMA-M C. PARKE, No. HIS Gough St.. San Franeisoo Cal 



Jan. 7, U3 

AKTISTIC 



s.w FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



CALIFORNIA. 



HOME8 OF 
No. 52. 

lit. Ml Ml I OV Mr.. I.Vm vn «' I' u'.ki , San FlAMCISOO 

Upon the lower side ol Gongh street, el the Dumber U18. ia one 
ol the prettleat hoiiaea whlcb have Appeared in the N 
Berlee ••! ■rtotjpea, Ai to \%t exterior, thai nil be judged from the 
picture; bat urastk end attractive :i- h is, it hut faintly suggests the 
conirbrt, testa and eleganoeto be found within. Thai its occupants 
have a plentitnde of that factor India] a health and happi- 

neos. solar heat, needs do demonstration, for the windows till court 
tin- Bunsbtne, having been built with projections. 

The doable doors of walnut, witfa plate-glasa Bashes, open directly 
into the main hail, which, like the rest of the house, is finished in 
walnut and redwood. On its right wide rolling doors give entrance 

10 the parlor, which Ul nearly Bquare, with tWO immense windows 

meeting at right angles in one oorner o( tin- room. The tower sash of 

MCh is One Wide, long Sheet Of plate glass; the upper pane is some- 

what smaller, being bordered by small, square, sour panes of tinted 
gtasa. This Btylfl of window ornamentation prevails throughout the 
house. The parlor fireplace, confronting the halt door, is set in col- 
ored tiles. The mantel and chimney-piece, elaborate in design, with 
beveled mirror in the center, are of richly polished mahogany. Be- 
yond this apartment is the DOCK parlor, its south wall swelling into a 
DOW with three windows. The fireplace, faring the front parlor, iy 
set in glased brick, with mantel of Spanish cedar. This room also 
communicates with the ball on the left, and on the east with the 
dining-room, extending across the full width of the house. Here the 
woodwork expresses itseU in a beautiful dado of square panels. In 
the left wall, or on the north, the bullet is recessed, with the china 
and the glass closets proj^eting on each side. The fireplaee on the 
west, or in the wall between the dining-room and back parlor, is set 
In pictured old gold tiles, with brass finishings and andirons. The 
mantel and chimney-piece are quite elaborate, the rich red cherry- 
wood showing to advantage in its areaded shelves, and bric-a-brac 
lockers with glass fronts. A large plate mirror assumes the center. 
The dining-room opens into the back hall, with its stairs and side en- 
tronce, Beyond is a square, well-lighted kitchen, with a French 
range, rlosets, pantry and door opening upon the basement flight. 
Below are the laundry, store-rooms, servants' rooms. 

The main staircase is of black walnut, and with one turn it rises to 
the second Story. In the lower hall, under the stairs, is a closet for 
w raps and a lavatory. At the landing near the head of the stairs is 
the hall window, the lower sash ground glass of a rich red, the upper 
the same in blue. The hall of the second story runs nearly the length 
of the house. The principal chamber, embracing the entire front 
of the house, has spacious closet, lavatory, fireplace in tessellated 
tiles, ami mahogany chimney-piece with mirror. Its crowning at- 
traction is the round window formed by the projecting tower, which 
contributes so much to the picturesqiieness of the exterior. From 
these four windows may be seen Lone Mountain, the city as it 
stretches Mission-wards, the moving lights of five cable lines, and 
one horse-car route. There are also discernable the shipping from 
Mission Bay, the ferries (particularly at night hand, by its prominent 
buildings, the course of Market street may be traced. There is an- 
other bed-room communicating with the principal chamber; it has 
four sunny windows, and opens into the bath-room, in which is the 
linen-closet. Beyond is another bed-room, and at the end of the hall 
is another large chamber with exceptionally fine view of the city. In 
the hall are several fine closets. 

The attic contains much available space, besides that devoted to 
a large billiard-room with dormer windows, from which the view is 
exceptionally fine. 

Along the side of the house extends a grassy slope, which broad- 
ens into the full width of the lot in the rear, with a flower-garden 
flanked with callas in full bloom. The paths are laid with broad 
walks, and all the surroundings of this residence, both within and 
without, bespeak refinement and wealth. 

AS TO THE TAIL AND THE DOG. 
Why doth a dog wag hith tail? asks Dundreary, and his answer to 
the conundrum need not consume our space. Southern California 
has long played " tail" to our dog, but it is on the cards that, ere the 
census of 1890 comes to be taken, that tail will be found wagging this 
dog, sure enough. For in piping times like the present, two and a 
haff years make a century in the way of adjusting preponderances 
of population. Up to a recent date California had five towns (to 
speak of), namely, San Francisco and Oakland (one); Sacramento, 
two; Stockton, three; San Jose, four; and time was when Marysville 
counted for a fifth. Now we have to add Los Angeles (one); San 
Pedro, two; Santa Barbara, three; with near a dozen more growing 
so fast that it is not easy to keep the run of them. Amongst the last, 
however, may be named Fresno; and Fresno is to be named because 
it stands for the San Joaquin country. Now, on any sort of a sec- 
tional " issue " between Southern California and our "California, on 
which side would the San Joaquin country range itself ? For it be- 
gins to look much as if, on such an issue, the San Joaquin country 
would hold the balance of power. Another question offers, which 
should be an interesting one for politicians, namely, with which 
national party do these newcomers train ? They are represented to 
be over average and well-to-do. This means a vote for Cleveland, but 
it by no means implies a vote for a State Democracy run by a Buck- 
ley or a "Stockton Convention" gang. In short, 'intelligence and 
well-to-do-ness may be counted on against a machine " outfit " of any 
such sort. After the census of 1890 the State will have to be re- 
districted ; she may have another representative or two in Congress ; 
the legislative distribution of representation will be widely different 
from what it is now. Then there will be a merry, merry time. " Par- 
rot and monkey " will be but a tame and meagre epithet for it. If the 
new-comers stand out for all their rights, the job will be worth a com- 
petency for the Boss — whether a Buckley or a Higgins be then fore- 
man of the dominant machine. But the Tail must not expect to get 
away with the Dog, unless it " puts up " handsomely. But even the 
News Letter, incurious in merely speculative politics, would like to 
know whether the new chaps call themselves Republican or Democrat. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of b ten | ■ . .. ■ Ulfornls; loesr 

Uon .»f works I u»carora Mtulng District, ElkoCouutr. Nevada. 

rob? riven, that at a mcrtlug of the Hoard of Directors, held 

on the IGth day --J I -iiiIut. i»: ,* % ■ 

per share was U-\ led upon tin- . npiinl Block ••( the ooi p 

mediately, In 1 -■ c rotary, at tin- mil f the 

Montgomery vtrcet,8an Pnu> 
ii nfa. 

Any itOOk Upon whlOD Hil- iL- -Mm nt -.hall remain unpaid 00 

The Twenty-fourth Day ol January, 1888. will be Delinquent, 
And advertised for wle at public auction . and unless payment Is made !■«• 
f-.r., will be sold od THURSDAY, the sixteenth day ol February, 
pay the delinquent Hs-f--.iii.-nt, together with oosta of advertising aud 
I'xpeiiscs of sale. By order of tin- Hoard id Dlre< 

HENRY DE tS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 62, Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery street, Shu Fran- 
cisco, California. I Dec. 17. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 
Locatiou of principal place of business— -8»0 Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Silver Star Mlniug District, Storey County ^Nevada. 

Notice Ik hereby given that at a meeting ol the Board of Directors, held on 
the L2th day of December, i sv 7, an assessment (No. l) of Twenty-five Cents 
Kc.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately in United Btatee gold coin, to the Secretary, at the otlice of tin- 
Company, Room 69, Nevada Block, No. :toy Montgomery street, San Francis- 
CO, Cat. 
Any stock upou which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Sixteenth Day of January. 1888, will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auctiou; and unless payment Is made bo- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the eighth day of February, 1888, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud ex- 
penses of sate. By order of the Buuni of Directors. 

ALFRED K DTJBBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room No. 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. California. (.Dec. IT. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Locatiou of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca 
tiou of Works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice ie hereby given that al >i meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the i3th day of December, 1Sst.hu a-sessment (No. 3) of twenty-five cents 
per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventeenth Day of January. 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless paymeut is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the third day of February, 1888, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expeuses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. H. FISH, Secretary, 

Office— Room 23 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco. C al ifornia. [Dec. 17. j 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Manhattan Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California Loca- I 
tiou of works— Austin, Lauder County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 9th day of December, 1887, an assessment (No. 7) of One Dollar ($1) , 
per share was levied upou the Capital Stock of the Corporation, payable im- ! 
mediately in United Suites gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, Room 8, No. 327 Pine street, Sau Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Twelfth day of January, 1888, will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and uuless payment is made be- \ 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, the thirty-first day of January, 1888 : 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 
e pe JOHN CROCKETT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine Street, Stock Exchange Building, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California.^ E Dec - 17 - 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— 8an Franciaco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twenty-ninth (29) day of December, 1887, an assessment (No. f,) of 
Fifty (50c ) Cents per share was levied npon the capital stock of the cor- 
noration payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Seeretnry, 
at the office "of the company. Room 52, Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery 
street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which tins assessment shall remain unpaid ou 

Monday, the sixth (6) day of February, 1888, will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction: and uuless paymeut is made be- 
fore will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-eighth (28) day of February, 
188«'to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertis- 
ing 'and expenses of sale. By order of the BoardofDlreetore. ^^ 

Office— Room 52 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. t Dec - 81 - | 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

8ierra Nevada Silver Mining; Company. \ 

Delinouent 'in Ome'e" .".'.'.'". January 11th, 1888 

Say TMBe.inouen, Stock £ „ ^^nary^.h.1888 

Office— Room 57 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. f Dec - 10 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



DOES MINING PAY? 
Dt»es mining for the precious metals in California and the neigh- 
boring Territories pay? It would be highly interesting, if full and 
precise details were before us with which to answer this question 
with accuracy. There can be no doubt but that there is a very wide- 
ly extended suspicion abroad that every dollar's worth of gold and 
silver now being produced in California and Nevada costs more than 
a hundred cents to produce it. This is undoubtedly true of all that 
lias been yielded by the great Comstock lode since the Bonanza mines 
ceased paying dividends some eight or nine years ago. Since then 
assessments have been continuous, whilst there have been no divi- 
dends worth talking about. That mining pays the men who control 
the diamond drills, mill the ore, and secure the inside information, 
goes without saying; but whether it returns to the general body of 
stockholders dollar for dollar on their expenditures is another and 
totally different matter. The question is not whether mining paid in 
former years, but whether it pays now; and neither is it as to whether 
a particular mine is profitable, but whether mining as a whole leaves 
a margin of profit sufficient to pay a fair interest upon the capital in- 
vested. Unhappily, our Mining 'Bureau collects no statistics that 
would solve the doubts which many are inclined to entertain upon 
this subject. The Secretary for Mines, in the Colony of Victoria, 
Australia, has recently, at great length, answered the problem so far 
as the Colony with which he is connected is concerned. He shows 
that during 1886 — one of the least prosperous of years— gold was pro- 
duced of the total value of $13,553,365. This productionTcost (includ- 
ing five per cent, allowed on the capital value of machinery, plant, 
etc.)$ll,928,400, leaving a net profit on gold mining in that particular 
Colony of Australia of $1,624,965. There can be no doubt about min- 
ing paying in that case. There are those who claim that the produc- 
tion of the precious metals even at a loss would be advantageous to a 
country. The chief value of those metals to civilized communities is 
as a medium of exchange. Bills, promissory notes and undertakings 
to pay are only good so far as the credit given to their makers is well 
founded, and the precious metals being the recognized measures of 
values, the demand for them increases whenever a commercial panic 
is threatened, or, in other words, whenever credit is restricted or con- 
fidence is shaken. No greater calamity can overtake a trading nation 
than an insufficiency of coin with which to carry on its commercial 
operations. It may therefore happen that, even if the balance on the 
nation's mining account be on the wrong side of the ledger, there 
may still be an advantage derived from the production of the precious 
metals to the country in which they are raised and distributed. 
Looking to the fact that those metals are the great agent in estab- 
lishing commercial confidence and stimulating trade and manufac- 
tures, most persons will admit that their production at a price that 
will pay expenses is a positive national gain. 

THE AUSTRALIAN EXHIBITION. 
The Australian Colonies are making strenuous and most credit- 
able exertions to have the products and industries of the world well 
represented at tbe exhibition which is to open at Melbourne on the 
1st of August next. The colonists, being per capita a wealthy people, 
are large purchasers. They are England's best customers next to 
India. Their trade is doubly profitable, because they supply cheap 
raw material, whilst they take in return manufactured articles. Dur- 
ing recent years their trade has been bid for by more nations than 
one. Germany, in particular, has made a bold effort to grasp a fair 
share of it. A subsidized line of German steamers is cutting into the 
business. France having interests in New Caledonia, Tahiti and other 
points in the South Pacific, is preparing to woo Australian commerce, 
and that is believed to be the true secret of her recent complacent 
settlement of the New Hebrides difficulty. The United States have a 
trade, that might easily be made much larger than it is, with the 
Colonies. It is a very profitable trade, in the ordinary commercial 
acceptation of the term. It is about the only trade we do which 
leaves a large balance in our favor. Each steamer, for several months 
past, has brought us over half a million dollars in gold. This, for the 
most part, is in settlement of their indebtedness on the account cur- 
rent between the two countries. So far the trade wooing has been 
altogether on their side. The very steamers— American built and 
sailed though they are— which bring us this gold, and carry our let- 
ters and commerce through the isles of the Pacific to the great Aus- 
tralian continent, are subsidized and supported by them and not by 
us. With an origin, language and institutions common with our own, 
our intercourse with them might well be cultivated with more knowl- 
edge and friendliness than it is. The coming exhibition may well be 
made to serve as the occasion for a better uaderstanding. President 
Cleveland, in a special message, has recommended an appropriation 
of $50,000 for the purpose of having the United States adequately re- 
presented at the Melbourne exhibition. It ought to be voted with all 
possible good feeling. 

Congressman Felton has introduced a series of bills which may be 
aptly described as bills to give everything to everybody. In words he 
builds a wall of exclusion between this country and China; he re- 
turns to the canners of fruit the duties on the sugar they have used 
during the past year (as a Christmas present— a kind of sugar plum, 
as it were); and he increases the duty on raisins, prunes, olives and 
other California products over a hundred per cent. ; and he finishes 
up with a little bill to quiet title to certain lands in which nobody he 
knows is interested. A smart boy is Charley. "Very ! 

It is a curious fact that, whereas the Republicans are objecting to 
the confirmation of Lamar on the ground that he is an " ex-Confed- 
erate," the practice was commenced by Grant, continued by Haves 
and ended by Arthur. They each and all appointed " ex-rebeis " 
Judges of Federal Courts, who, in their respective States, would ne- 
cessarily have to interpret the United States Constitution. Their 
names were Hammond and Key of Tennessee, Paul of Virginia, 
Sneer of Georgia, Settle of Florida and Boardman of Louisiana, all 
of whom served in the Confederate Army. 

A bald-headed "chef" never worries for fear of hairs being found 
in the soup. —Hotel Mail. 



CITY STABLES, 

A. de la ROZA, Proprietor. 

SUCCESSOR TO TOM C. BARRY, 
S^-lST JOSE, CA1. 



The First-Class Stable of the Garden City. 

Your Livery and Hack Custom Politely Solicited. 
THE BOARDING OF HORSES A SPECIALTY. 

gm- PLEASE CALL.' 



SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cat. 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 

PIAWOS. [Oct. 8. 



P. W. WlLLCOX. 



J. P. JABMAN. 



cr. 



:p. .t.a_:r,:m:^:n~ & co. 

No. 20 North First Street, San Jose, 

DEALERS IN 

WALL PAPER, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISH, ETC. 



CONTRACTS RECEIVED. 



fOct. 8. 



DRUG CASH STORE, 

S. H. WAGENER, PROPRIETOR, 

39 North First Street, San Jose, Cat. TOct. 8. 

JACOB ZDIEIISrZIEIN- & S03ST, 

ARCHITECTS, 

Office : 75 East Santa Clara Street, Opera House Block. 

Residence: 167 South Viae St. [Oct. 8.J San Jose, Cal. 

EMPEROR WILLIAM, BISMARCK, 
The Empress of Austria, the highest nobility of Europe, thousands of 
families, and many physicians, are using aud patronizing ELECTRO- 
HOMCEOPATHY, the wonderful improvement of the old Homcenpathic 
system. No sufferer of auy kind of acute or chronic disease ought to 
despair before having consulted DR. J. BERNOULLI, 218 Post Street, 
the official representative of Electro-Homoeopathy. 

Books aud Remedies for self-treatment sold. 

If- AGENTS WANTED. [Dec. 10. 

s im: .a. J-, Hi :e? o x .' 

SCHOOL CHILDREN AND EVERYBODY SHOULD WEAR 

CULVER'S CARBOLIC SAFETY PAD I — Price, 25 Cents. 

Sent by Mail on receipt of price 

Agents: LANGLEY & MICHAELS, 

Jan. 7. J San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. " 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 39 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied January 4th, 1888 

Delinquent in Office February ytb, 1888 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 2d, 1888 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office- Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. jJan. 7. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Fourth day of January, 1888, an assessment (No. 48) of Fifty Cents 
(50c. ) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office of the 
Company, Room 3, No. 329 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid oo 
The 8th day of February, 1888. will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made he- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the Twenty-ninth day of February, 1888, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Stock Exchange Building, No. 329 Pine street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. [Jan. 7. 

' ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 2-4 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied December 5th, 1887 

Delinquent in Office January 10th, 1888 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock January 3lst, 1888 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Dee. 10. 



Jan. 



18€8, 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



FLOWERS AND TREES IN L06 ANGELES. 

As you walk up through the reaidem e porMoo <*f the olty, you iw 
lit.- rtTMtfl on either ride lined with the pepper tree, which, by the 
var.U quite beeadfalju long.pendenl branches resembling whip 
lashes, clothed with ■ Ugh l green foliage Intermingled with numerous 
clusters ol pale pink berries, swinging gracefully in the breeze. The 
trunk-, are somewhat crooked and gnarled, but ii* good qualities 
over-balance thai defect. The eucah puis tr.-,- \s seen very frequent 
h; it lacks both grace and beau ly. Is noted for Its scraggy appear- 
anea and rapid growth. It is, no doubt, valuable as a fuel proaucer 
■ !*■-- country. It seems to thrive even on the driest land. On 
either hand beautiful and well kepi lawns greet you, as Bne as any 1 
aver saw, Bast or North; of course thej are kept up by constant 
sprinkling. Beautiful specimens of palm's arc to be seen in almost 
every yard, and tropical-looking bananas loom up with their massive 
leaves, The Monterey cypres* is grown and trimmed in fanciful 
and La also extensively grown fur hedges; it makes one ol the 
Bneal ranees 1 ever saw, being very dense ana bearing trimming well. 
The araucarm is an aristocrat among trees. Some noble specimens of 
it ar«- to be seen towering up In stately rorm by the side of other trees 
of more humble appearance. 

The aralia and the BcUfl elastica are to be seen in the shape of trees 
a fool in diameter, the former with nicely-cut foliage, and the latter 
with Ita great Shilling, leathery leaves, making a beautiful appear- 
ance. Rosea were to he seen almost everywhere in countless num- 
bers. I think, in California, they come nearer the size they are usu- 
ally illustrated in tlorist*' catalogues than in any other place I know 
of. Plumbago is to be seen trained up the side or corner of a bouse, 
running rampant, thirty t<« forty feet; its pale blue Mowers hang in 
vast number", contrasting nicely with the white flowers of the jas- 
mine, that is frequently growing by its side. The showy Hibiscus, 
with its large, brilliant blooms, enlivens the scene. Fuchsias, too, 
lend their color to make things beautiful: single plants, ten to four- 
teen feet in bight, with hundreds of flowers, are frequently seen, 
i ieraniums run riot with one another, and in fact, it seems as though 
everything in the plant line was trying to out-do the other. Crape 
myrtle looked like great sheets of pink, so dense was its bloom. What 
Beamed strange was to see the magnolia tree in full bloom in August; 
its great white flowers peeping out through the glossy green leaves of 
the tree made a beautiful sight. —Tick's Magazine. 

WHAT IS RAW MATERIAL? 
Raw material means products on which little or no labor is ex- 
pended, and which are essential totheestablishmentof manufactures. 
Thus, coal is a raw material. It is a product of nature, which calls 
for the expenditure of no labor in the process of its manufacture; 
yet it is the essential life-giving element of nearly all manufactur- 
ing, (heap coal means cheap and rapid transit and cheap manufac- 
turing capacity, and therefore it means the best, because the most 
direct and certain, kind of protection to American labor. It should 
be put upon the free list undoubtedly. Lumber is another raw ma- 
terial, upon which labor may be employed, and it ought to be put 
in the same category as coal. Wool grows without the assistance 
of human skill upon the sheep's back, and the sheep matures upon 
the grasses that spring spontaneously from the earth. There is no 
labor expended in producing it. All man has to do is to shear it and 
send it to market. There is no labor in it to protect. It is essential 
to an enormous manufacturing industry. Upon it millions worth 
of labor can be expended. The cheaper "the raw material the greater 
the protection to the labor which enters into its manufacture. 
Therefore, wool should beplaced upon the free list. The great argu- 
ment in favor of protective duties is that they are necessary to protect 
American labor against that of cheaper countries. But when no 
amount of labor worth talking about enters into the production of the 
article, where is the necessity of protection? Coal, and wood, and 
iron and wool can be placed upon the market more easily in this 
country than in any other on the face of the globe! Where, then, 
does the protection of American labor come in? Besides, are not 
the charges for transportation, etc., upon the foreign article a suffi- 
cient protectional to raw materials which can be obtained at home 
with so little labor, and the cheapness of which determines the cost 
of manufactures? All raw materials should, as President Cleveland 
recommends, be placed on the free list. 

THE HIGHEST WATERFALLS. 
According to Dr. Wertsch, the highest waterfalls are the three 
Krimbs Falls, in the Upper Prinzgau, which have a total hight of 
1,148 feet. The three falls next in hight are found in Scandinavia— 
the Verme Foss, in Romsdal (984 feet); the Vettis Foss, on the Sogne 
Fjord (853 feet); the Rjukan Foss, in Thelemarken (804 feet). With 
a decrease in hight of 213 feet, the three Velino Falls (591 feet), near 
Zerni, the birthplace of the historian Tacitus, follow next, and are 
succeeded by the three Tosa Falls, in the Val Formazza (541 feet). 
The GasteinFalls, in the Gastein Valley (469 feet), are midway be- 
tween the Skjiiggedal Foss, in the Hardanger Fjord (524 feet), and 
the Boring Foss, in the same fjord. The great Anio Cascade, near 
Tivoli (315 feet), appears small by the side of the foregoing, but is 
still larger than the falls of the Eibe, in the Riesengebirge, which are 
only 148 feet high. If the width of the falls is taken into considera- 
tion, the most imposing are those of the Victoria Falls of the Zam- 
besi, which are 394 feet high, by a width of 8,200 feet. A long way 
behind come the Niagara Falls, 177 feet high and 1,968 feet wide. The 
third largest fall is that of the Rhine at Schaffhausen, 148 feet wide, 
by only 33 feet high. The highest waterfalls mentioned cannot com- 
pare with those gigantic falls as regards cubic contents. — Iron. 



Ladies' Chiffoniers, 
With bonnet box and jewel case, with Yale lock, at Chadbourne's, 
741, 743 and 745 Market street. 

"Grasshoppers on toast" is one of the dainty dishes in the menu 
of a Nebraska hotel. Most men jump -when they see it. 



POMMERY 




S E O I 

WILLIAM WOLFF &c CO. 

Sole Agents for this Renowned Brand of Champagne, 

105 Front Street. 
HOTEL "WIICTIDSOIE^, 

(LATE AKMY AND NAVY), 

Victoria Street, London, S. W. 

250 APARTMENTS. 

"IE LECTEIC LIGH TZ 



T-u.r3sislL and S-roimming Batons. 



Oct. is.] 



J. R. CLEAVE, Mane 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 
A Quiet House of Peculiar Excellence. 

ARMY AND NAVY HEADQUARTERS. 
Jan. 7.] ' WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



PARAISO SPRINGS! 

MONTEREY COUNTY, GAL., 

THE C-A-K,XjSB.A.3D OF -A-l^EEX^IC-A. ! 

NEW MANAGEMENT I NEW IMPROVEMENTS! 
The most Beautiful, most Invigorating, most Easy of Accessor all Min- 
eral Spring Resorts— 1,500 feet above the sea level. Take San Jose Cars, 
8:30 morning, and arrive at Springs at dinner. 

J. G. FOSTER, Proprietor. 

ED. FOSTER. Aset. Manager. 

-Telegraph, Express and Postoffices. [Feb. 10. 



ST- JAMES HOTEXj, 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 
TYLER BEACH, PROPRIETOR. 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all Modern Improvements. The 
rooms are large, airv, and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, 
next door to trie Court House- No expense has been spared in making this 
a First-Class Hotel in every respect. 

AMERICAN PLAN. Kates, $2.00 to $2.50 per day. Special Prices by the 
Week or Month. Coach and Carriage at Depot on arrival of all Trains. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The State Investment and Insurance Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above-named 

Company, for the election of a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, will be held at the office of the Company, Nos. 218 and 220 Sausome 

street, on 

Tuesday, the 10th day of January, 1888, at 12 o'clock M. 

CHS. H. CUSHING, Secretary. 
San Francisco, December 22, 18-S7. [Jan. 7. 



Eclipse Extra Dryblvl 



Of moat delicate flavor, and ths 
e Champagne produced in 
United States. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



BIZ." 



The new year opens auspiciously for the agriculturist, horticul- 
tnrist, and, in fact, all productive interests. Copious rains have fall- 
in all over the State. Snow is upon the mountains to a great depth, 
and Becnrea us from any fear of a drought during the Summer's heat. 
Oras.-i and grain have already had a tine start, and the hills and val- 
leys afford good pasturage for cattle and sheep. 

"Merchants are busy preparing for a season of promised activity in 
all departments of trade. The past was a year of no little progress 
and much activity; still we lood for better things to come. Immi- 
gration is Hocking to our shores in great numbers, and of these a 
great portion are men of wealth, who come to found homes and en- 
gage in some profitable industry. 

The sheep farmers of this coast are all up in arms, fearing that the 
duty upon foreign imports is to be removed by Congress and thus 
jeopardize the value and importance of this staple interest of Cali- 
fornia. The Wool product of this State in 1887 is placed at 31,564,231 
lbs., and in addition to this we have received from Oregon 7,25*5,000 
lbs., while foreign imports amounted to 40,4<Xt lbs. The local con- 
sumption by our factories was D, 808.787 lbs., and exports by sea and 
rail eastward was 27 ,461,950 lbs. The present stock on hand amounts 
to 6,000,000 lbs. George Abbott, who furnishes these statistics, places 
the value of the Wool exported in 1887 at $5,000,000. 

The Coal market has been considerably inflated for a few months 
past. The inflation is due to artificial or speculative causes, and is 
without any substantial basis. There is no scarcity of stock, and the 
supply is regular, with an active demand. House consumption runs 
largely upon Wellington and Seattle. The local press is largely 
chargeable with the rise in values, having frightened consumers with 
the fear of a Coal famine. Imports at this port for 1887 were 1,154,993 
tons; at San Pedro. 138,000 tons; and at San Diego, 58,000 tons. The 
deliveries at this port, home and foreign, embrace the following 
kinds: Australian, 156,729; English and Welsh, 94.028; Scotch. 12,- 
108; Anthracite and Cumberland, 21,709; British Columbia. 252.810; 
Seattle, Franklin. Green and Cedar River, 292,179; Carbon Hill, 181,- 
267; South Prairie, 48, US; Coos Bay and Mount Diablo, 96,000. The 
duty on all foreign Coals is 75 cents per ton. The advanced prices 
over the average of the past is about $2@$2 50 per ton ; present range, 
$9@?9 50 per ton. the highest for ten years. 

The Salmon pack of British Columbia for the past season aggre- 
gated 202.011 cases— sav Fraser River, 128.806 cs. ; Skeena River, 58,- 
278 cs.; River Inlet, 11,105 cs.; Alert Bay, 3,822 cs. The present 
stock of Salmon in this market is light, and the price of Columbia 
River fish is now 35 cents per dozen above that of the past year at 
even date. 

The following freight engagements are noted : Br. iron ship Many- 
down. 2,381 tons. Wheat to Cork, owners' account; Br. iron ship 
Glenfinart, 1,530 tons. Wheat to Cork. £1 lis; Br. iron bark Ravens- 
wood, 1,089 tons. Merchandise to Sydney, lump sum ; ship W. H. 
Macy. 2,092 tons, now at this port, Coal from Newcastle, N. S. W., to 
San 'Diego, reported at $5.75 per ton; Br. bark Royal Tar, 717 tons, 
Lumber from Eureka to Sydney. 



Youthful Indulgence 
in pernicious practices, pursued in solitude, is a most startling cause of 
nervous and general debility, lack of self-confidence and will power, im- 

S aired memory, despondency and other attendants of wrecked manhood. 
ufferera Bhoula address, with 10 cents in stamps, for laree illustrated 
treatise, pointing out unfailing means of perfect cure. World's Dispensary 
Medical Association, MS Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Advice to Consumptives. 
On the appearance of the first symptoms, as general debility, loss of appe- 
tite, pallor, chilly sensations, followed by night-sweats and cojigh. prompt 
measures of relief should be taken. Consumption is scrofulous disease of 
the lungs; therefore use the great anti-scrofulous or blood-purifier and 
strength-restorer, I>r. Pierce's "Golden Medical Discovery." Superior to 
cod-liver oil as a nutritive, and unsurpassed as a pectoral. For weak lungs, 
spitting of blood and kindred affections, it has do equal. Sold by drug- 
gists. For Dr. Pierce's treatise on consumption, send 10 cents in stamps. 
World's Dispensary Medical Association, 6t»8 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

The Bilious, 
dyspeptic, constipated, should address, with 10 cents in stamps for treatise, 
World's Dispensary Medical Association, 663 Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



Mrs. Cyrus W. Field, Jr.. is said to be the smallest atom of fem- 
ininity which graces New York society. She has the daintiest of fig- 
ures, an impossible foot and a rather piquant, childish face, delicately 
tinted and guiltless of powder— pink, white or pearl! She is a gay 
Uttle woman, nervous to a degree and of decided views, which she 
voices with the true Yankee intonation, with a fnnny and constantly 
recurring little laugh which has two notesinit.and a Bernhardtesque 
trick with her mouchoir. Like the great tragedienne, little Mrs. Field 
emphasizes all her sentiments with her handkerchief. She intro- 
duces an idea with a flourish of lace-edged cambric, and follows it 
up with a hard knot in one corner. She picks this out with patience 
and rolls the mouchoir into a hall— she shakes it out — she rumples it 
up— she irons it with the warmth of two pink palms— she makes a 
plisse fan of it— she folds it into a square— she pats it, waves it, 
crushes it, crumples it, and, in moments of strong excitement, she 
has been known to send it, ruthlessly, to rags. 

First Sweet Girl— " 1 understand that handsome stranger has been 
calling on you quite regularly." Second Sweet Girl—" Yes, he's awful 
tiresome." "Tiresome?" "Yes. he don't do a thing the whole 
evening but sit on the extreme end of the sofa and talk." 

— Omaha World. 

Mahogany Rockers ! 
Burnished gold trimmings— our original designs. Chadbourne's, 
741, 713 and 715 Market street. 

D. Albert Hiller, M. D., 1011 Sutter street, San Francisco, California. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

flos. 309 and 371 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
aoent8 fob grower8 and manufacturers, 

Charterers of Vessels for All Trades, 
Agents for the Mexican Phosphate and Sulphur Co.'s 

PRODUCT8, 

And General Insurance Agents, 
Have correspondents in the chief Cities of the United States. Eu- 
rope, Australia, India, China and principal Islands of the Pacific, 
and attend to the Purchase of Goods and the Sale of California 
Products in those Countries. f Jan. 22. 



WM. t. 
SHIPPING AND 



Coleman & Co., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NEW YORK. 



Chicago: 
91 IICH1C1I 1YEIUK, 

T. B. Mc Govern, 
Agent. 

New York City, 
71 Hudson Street. 



—AGENCIES— 
London: 
4 BiskopagaU St Within, 
Eugene E. Jones, 

Agent. 

Liverpool, 
54 Drury Buildings. 



Astoria : 

Plavel's Wharf k Warehouse, 

Jno. F. MCGOVEEN, 

Agent. 

Los Angeles, 

75 North Spring St. 



We have our Brokers in every commercial city of importance in the West- 
ern, Middle and Eastern States, and employ a large staff of traveling sales- 
men. We have the best facilities for the distribution of California Products 
East, and give especial attention to 

C A TilFOBIsTIA 

Canned Goods, Raisins, Wines and Brandies, 

Borax, Barley, Canned Salmon, 

Salmon in Barrels, Mustard Seed, 

Dried Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, 

Lima and Small White Beans and Other Products. 

[Feb. 26.1 



H. B Williams. 



W. H. DlMOND 



A. CHESEBRODGH. 

WILLIAMS, DlMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, The Canard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of 
Clippers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 



C. WOOLRIGH, 

Commission and Forwarding Agent, Mazatlan, Mexico. 

Agent for Pacific Mail S. S. Co., RoyalMail S. P. Co., The Marine Insurance 
Co. and Lloyds of London. 

A residence of 34 years on the west coast of Mexico enables me to offer 
useful services and large experience to intending investors and owners of 
properties for the purchase and sales of mines, lands, etc., in Sinaloa and 
adjoining States. 

Merchandise and machinery forwarded to the interior and all commission 
business trausacted with care and punctuality. [Oct. 15. 



S. L. Jones. 



E. D. Joneb. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. |January9. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS k WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 
[gen. 19.] 

E. L. 6. STEELE & CO., 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW 4 CO.), 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

8AN FRANCISCO. 

— AGENTS - 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery. 

Eclipse Extra Dryi P ™ir portedCh ^ 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



I'.i 



I 



NOTABILIA. 



Senator Hawley bu been and gone and done it. Hi-* row wife re- 
in a luxurious growth of reu hair, and that entirely ohaogea 
the Honorable Joseph's status aa s Presidential oandtdate. A -lark 
horse bitched with a red beaded woman will not be tolerated in this 
age ol enlightened superstition bo long aa there remains a single soul 
who la unaware thai M Betheada .Mineral Water" laadeUgbtCul never- 
age aa well aa an effective medicine. Every housekeeper should pal 
it on her table. L Cahen A ^on, No. 118 Baaramento street, are the 

Pacific (.'oast agents lor it. 

"Yes, Bobby," said the minister, who was dining with the family, 
" everything In the world has its use, although we may not know 

what it is. You wouldn't think that (lies are j-uotl for anything, 
yet— — " "Oh, yes. i would.*' interrupted Bobby: "I know what 
Dies are good for." "What, Bobby?" •* l'a aaya they are the only 
thing;* what keeps him awake when you are preaching. r 

Young Housekeeper (to fish dealer): What kind of fish have you 
this morning? Ftac Dealer: How would you like some striped bass, 
mum? Y. II. (hesitatingly): No. I think J would prefer something 

in a small check. She didn't get what she wanted, and so she has 
given up housekeeping. She now lives in a beautiful suite of apart- 
ments and has her meals at Swain's Bakery, No. 213 butter street, 
where every seasonable delicacy can be obtained. 

Butcher (to Bridget): This bill has been running for a long time, 
and you can say to Mrs. Hendricks that while 1 don't want to squeeze 
her f"<>r the money, I shall have to if it is not paid very soon. Bridget 
(with virtuous wrath): Faith, an' it's not the loikes avyez that would 
squaze ony female inimber av this boardin'-house. — Epoch. 

He: Are you doing any painting now, Misstilnize? She: No, I'm 
not painting: I'm working in pastel. He: Pastel? What's that? 
She: Oh, colored chalks, you know: the best effects are got with the 
tips of the finger. He: Oh, I know; I've seen the men doing it on 
the pavements. Awfully jolly? And then he went off to White, No. 
OH Commercial street, and bought a beautiful silk Hat. 

We praised the blush on Beauty's cheek, 

Last eve, with words that tetl: 
That blush this morn, wondrous freak, 

Is here on our lapel ! — Puck. 

The Sultan of Turkey has bought a Waterbury watch. The task 
of winding it up is imposed upon bis nine hundred wives. Each wife 
devotes fifteen minutes each day to the work, and the labor thus di- 
vided does not become onerous or prevent the ladies from wishing to 
reside in San Jose, where Messrs. O. A. Hale & Co., of Nos. 140, 142 
and 14-1 South First street, have such a grand assortment of dry 

goods. 

Mrs. Boulanger. of Branch County. Michigan, gave birth to twins 
two years ago. A year ago she gave birth to triplets. Thanksgiving 
she added four more little Boulangers to the nursery. At this rate 
the Boulanger March will never die. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately 
after returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will 
be prevented. James G. Steele & Co., C35 Market street. 

"When a lady enters a crowded car no one more deeply appreciates 
the courtesy of him who gives her his seat than the man in the cor- 
ner, who means to offer his in case no one abdicates before she reaches 
his end of the-car. — Birmingham Rejrublic. 

"When you've dirty carpets that ought to be beat, 
Just send for S. Ferguson, 10 on Tenth street; 
His work is prompt, and good and neat. 

" The Horrors of Whaling " heads an article in the Post-Empress. 
The average American boy could write a big book upon that subject. 
Himself in the hold and his father at the spanker.— Dansville Breeze. 

The man who gets credit at his shoemaker's can hardly say his 
soles his own, but he can get his photograph taken at the Elite Gal- 
lery, 838 Market street, and so obtain a beautiful picture. 

Speaking of the lost caws, two hundred Crows have got away 
from the military, and we dare say they will carrion like thunder. 

— Boston Bulletin. 

Goto Swasey's Photograph Gallery, No. 26 Montgomery street, 
opp. Lick House, S. F., for Instantaneous Photographs. Pacific Coast 
views. Excellent Work. 

Blinks— My mother-in-law? Oh. she's a model. Never under- 
stood her to say an unpleasant word to me since I was married. 
Jinks— Indeed f Blinks— Yes— she's tongue-tied. — Cleveland Sun. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

An exchange publishes an article on "Russian Cavalry Move- 
ments." We presume the movements are governed by the spur of 
the moment. — Rochester Post-Express. 

Fredericksburg Brewing Co. Gold Medal, 1887. First Prize 
Medal 1885 and 1886. 

Dullard: Do you know women love to see themselves in print? 
Brightly : They ought to be encouraged, my boy ; it's a heap cheaper 
than silk. — Lowell Citizen. 

It is seldom one gets off anything new, but we noticed several 
people get off a new horse car the other day. —Boston Bulletin. 

H. W. Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, N. E. Cor. Taylor and Turk. 
A Soar Spot— The Eagle's nest. —Rahway Advocate. 

Wh. H, Keith & Co., West End Pharmacy, cor. McAllister and Fillmore. 
No corporation should pass a dividend without speaking. I 



T11K 

PACIFIC 3^TJTTTJ"-A.Xi 

Life Insurance Company of California, 

HOME OFFICE, 418 California Street, SAN FEANCISC0. 

Life Insurance. 
MOHT AI'I'KUVKD 1'LANH. 



Accident Insurance, 

kivk Advantage!, 
Poll Amount paid at 

i leal h : 
Full Amount for loss of 

two limbs; 
Fri.i. Amount for loss of 

both eyea; 
Onk third ol Policy for 

tou ol one i.iMn (hand 

or foot). 

Pays THIRTY WEEKS 
for total disability- 
being FOUR weeks 
mure than allowed by 
other companies. 



ASSETS: 
$1,600,000 00. 

Paid to Policy-holder*, 
93,600,000 00. 

Tim Btockroldxbs, 

with au'Srecatc wraith 
• >fg7.0<iO OHO Ou, arc 

made ll«hu- by taw for 
the debts of the Corpor- 
ation; ami Directors arc 
Ible f'ir act* of 
the Ofllccrs. 



Policies are lac 

Pollclesurc wnrhl ui<l«-. 
Policies are Plainly 

worded. 
Policies arc Liberal, 

■ 

IMMEDIATE PAYMENT 

after receipt of proofs 
of death, i* the repute 
ti.m enjoyed by this 
I Compuuy. 



OFFM'KRN 
GEO. A. MOORE. President 

J. N. PATTON . Secretary 

GEO. W. HEAVEK. Vice-President 
SAMUEL M. MAKES. Ass't SecreUrv 



W. R.CLUNES8, M.I)., Med.'IUn-rtor 
WE 0. GO OLD. .Actuary 

Qeneri 



rilOS. UENNKT 



ill AS, N. FOX 



. Attorney 



ALEX. W. BALDWIN, Slate Agent, 
406 California Street, San Francisco. 



FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY 



OF SAN FRANCISCO. 



Losses Paid in Past Twenty-five Years, 
SBVEIT MILLION" 13 O X. L, Jb. Ift S! 



Does the Largest Insurance Business on the Pacific Coast. 

D. J. 8TAPLES PRESIDENT. 

WM. J. DUTTON Secretary. 

Agents iu all Prominent Localities. |8ept. 10. 

ASK FOR 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S 




Extract of Meat, 

And insist upon no other being substituted for it. 

N. B.— Genuine only with fac-simile of Baron Licbig's signature in BLUE 
INK across label. 
Sold by Storekeepers, Grocers and Druggists. TDec. 31. 

jTtomkTnson's livery and sale stable, 

Nos. 57, 69 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Fraiinsro. One Blork from Palace Hotel. 

*•- Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east (Jor Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Kent at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 
M^-Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 
The "Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotaun Cartridges, under the 
Chamber im Patents. 

ALASKA^OMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. SIO Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

The Analysis of a Tear.— The principal 
element in the composition of atearis.as may 
readily be supposed, water. The other elements 
are salt, soda, phosphate of lime, phosphate 
of soda, and mucus, each in small proportions. 
A dried tear seen through a microscope of 
good average power presents a peculiar ap- 

Eearance. The water, after evaporation, leaves 
ehind it the saline ingredients, which amal- 
gamate and form themselves into lengthened 
cross lines and look like a number of minute 
hsh bones. The tears are secreted in what 
are called the "lachrymal glands," situated 
over the eyeball and underneath the lid. The 
contents of these glands are carried along and 
under the inner surface of the eyelids by means 
of six or seven very tine channels, and are dis- 
charged a little above the cartilage supporting 
the lid. The discharge of tears from the 
lachrymal glands is not occasional and acci- 
dental, as is commonly supposed, but continu- 
ous. It goes on both day and night— though 
less abundantly at night— through the " con- 
duits, ''and spreads equally over the surface 
of the pupil, in virtue of the incessant move- 
ment of the lids. After serving its purpose, 
the flow is carried away by two little drains, 
situated in that corner of each eye nearest the 
nose — into which they run — and called the 
" lachrymal points." The usefulness of this 
quiet flow of tears, to both men and beasts, is 
manifest. There is such an immense quan- 
tity of fine dust floating in the air, and con- 
stantly getting into the eyes, that, but for it, 
they would soon become choked. Very little 
is requisite to keep the ball free, and when 
some obnoxious substance — smoke, an insect, 
or the like that affects the nerves— does make 
its way in, an increased flow is poured out 
to sweep it away. 

Something New. — An anthropometric lab- 
oratory is a place where a person may have 
any of his various faculties measured in the 
best possible way and where duplicates of his 
measurements may be preserved as private 
documents for his own future use and refer- 
ence. All the various faculties are to be regis- 
tered. Accordingly, after the exact shape, the 
cubical contents, and the specific gravity of 
the individual have been ascertained, he will 
be tested for pace on a measured mile on land 
and a measured hundred yaTds in the water. 
The physical basis being thus ascertained, the 
capacity for self-restraint will next be tried. 
Then will come the memory tests, and the 
trials of originality and intellectual endurance. 
It would be impossible, except at great length, 
to explain the various processes available for 
these latter purposes, but a brief reference 
may be made to the uses of the register when 
completed. Evidently the register kept at 
the laboratory may be made use of as a refer- 
ence in all cases. To persons about to marry 
the record will, of course, be valuable and in- 
dispensable. Very great benefits will accrue 
to all classes of people. It will abolish the 
old test of a man's faculties by the work he 
does and what comes out of him. 

The New Russian Explosive.— The new 
Russian explosive, " Silatvor," continues to 
attract a very great deal of attention in Rus- 
sia. Experiments have recently been carried 
on with charges of three different sizes, which 
have proved that even a small addition great- 
ly increases the effect. As an example may 
be mentioned that an increase of the charge 
by 19-100 grain, raises the explosive power 
from 0' 17 to 0*65. The further experiments 
will, however, be postponed, for some little 
time, as the inventor is at present engaged in 

Eroducing silatvor under another form, as a 
rra substance instead of a porous one. Silat- 
vor gives no smoke when fired ; the very small 
portion of smoke that may be seen originates 
from the percussion caps", but the barrels re- 
main perfectly bright even after the firing of 
several shots. —Engineering, 

Ringing Church Bells by Electricity.— 
Among the gifts to be offered to the Pope on 
his birthday is a contrivance by a French en- 
gineer, named Arragon, for ringing large 
church bells by electricity. A similar arrange- 
ment is, we believe, at present at work in a 
London church, the apparatus having been 
designed and erected by some of the students 
at the Finsbury Technical College. 

— Electrician. 

Men who bite off more than they can chew 
are no worse off than those who want to chew 
more than they can bite off. 



NORTHERN,*; 



nDIVISION^i 



OUTHlllAClfi 



m 



TIME SCHEDULE. 
Passenger Trains leave and arrive at Passenger 
Depot (Townsend st., bet. 3d and 4th streets), San 
Franc isco : 

L « AVE I IN EFFECT JAN. 1, 1888. I A * R l VE 



12:01 p. K . .Cemetery and Sau Mateo-. >| 2:30p. 


+7:00*. 

8:30a. 
10:30 a. 
•3:30 p. 

4:30 p. 
*5:10p. 

6:30 p. 
{11:45 p. 


San Mate-* Redwood — 


6:40 a. 
*8:00a. 

9:03 a. 
•10:02 a. 
+3:30 p. 

4:36 p. 

6:40 p. 
17:50 p. 


8:30 a 
10:30 a 
*3:30 p. 

4:30 p. 


9:03 A. 

. . Santa Clara, San Jose and . . I i*10:02a. 

' . . . .Principal Way Stations . . / 4 :36 p. 

]\ 6:40p. 



10:30 a-U .Almaden and Way Stations. >| 
8:30a.| (..GilroY,Pajaro ( Castroville-.| |*10:02a. 
*3:30p.| I ..Salinas and Monterey ... j I 6:40 p. 



8:30 a. I 
*3:30p.| 



.Hollister and Tres Pinos. . 



1*10:02 a. 
I f6:40p. 



8 :30 a. I 
*3:30p.| 



Watsonville, Aptos, Soquel i |*10:02a. 
. (Capitola) and Santa Cruz j \ 6:40p. 



j i Soledad, Paso Robles, . i 
1 <Templeton (San Luis Obispo)> 
! ( and Way Stations ) 



a.— Morning. 
♦Sundays excepted. 
Train Saturdays only. 
Trains run on Pacific Standard Time 



p.— Afternoon. 
+ Sundays only. I Theatre 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 8:30 
.. m. Train. 



Nearly all rail line to SAN LUIS OBISPO. Only 
24 miles staging between Templeton and San Luis 
Obispo. Time from San Francisco, 12 hours. 

Through rate, $8.50. 



SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.— At Reduced 
Rates— to Gilroy Springs and Paraiso Springs. 



Excursion Tickets. 
SPECIAL NOTICE.— Round Trip Tickets to the 
famous Lick Observatory (Mt. Hamilton), can be 
obtained at any of the Company's Ticket Offices 
in San Francisco. Rate— $5.50. 
For Sundays only, (fold Sunday Morning; good 
J '■ J for Return same day. 

Sold Saturday and Sunday 
only; good for Return until fol- 
lowing Monday, inclusive, at 
the following ratesj _^_^ 



For Saturday, 
Sunday and 
Monday. 



Round Trip I Qlin Sat toll Rouud Trip CllF ,|Satto 
from San S£ n I Mou from San ££? Mon 
Francisco to! I Tkt. ||Francisco to 1Kl " Tkt. 



San Bruno ..{%.. I? 50 

Millbrae 1 65 

Oak Grove . .1 ..... | 90 
San Mateo... 75, 1 10 

Belmont | 1 00, 1 25 

Redwood....| 1 001 1 40 



Fair Oaks. . .| 1 25 
Menlo Park., 1 25 
Mayfield. . . | 1 25 
Mount'n V'w $1 50 



1 50 
1 60 
1 75 
$2 00 



(Lawrences .. 
I Santa Clara.. 
'Sau Jose- . .. 

[Gilroy 

; Hollister ... 

I Aptos 

Loma Prieta. 
ISoquel ...... 

ISanta Cruz.. 
iMonterey.... 



1 50 2 25 
1751 

1 75[ 

2 75 



4 00 

4 50 

5 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES.— Passenger Depot, Townsend 
Street; Valencia-street Station, No. 613 Market St., 
Grand Hotel and Rotunda, Baldwin Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt Ag't 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: THE STEAM- 
ERS UMATILLA AND MEXICO— 

For VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND 
Ports — 9 a. m. every Friday. 

The steamer MEXICO, sailing every other Fri- 
day, connects at Port Townsend with Steamers 
IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO.: Every five days. 

FOR SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hue- 
neme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, a. m. 

For EUREKA. ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay: CITY OF CHESTER, Every Tuesday 
at 9 o'clock a. m. 

FOR POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc.: Ev- 
ery Monday, at 3 p. m. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents 

Sept. 17.1 No. 10 Market street. 



\klf\ D 1/ FOK AtI * * 50 A WE£K aQ d 
W I J ll l\ expenses paid. Outfit worth g5 and 
" V,,IX particulars free. P. O. Tickery, 

Augusta, Me. [Oct. 15. 




THE DONAHUE BROAD GAUGE ROUTE. 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1887, ana 
until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
leave from and arrive at San Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 



LEAVE S. F. 


Destination. 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:45 A.M. 
3:30 P.M. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
5:00 p. m. 


Petaluma 

and 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a. m 
6:10p.m 


8:55 a.m. 
10:30 a. M 
6:05 P. M. 


1 1 Fulton 

I . Windsor, 

7:45 a. M.|8:00 a.m. j Healdsburg, 

3:30p.m.! .Cloverdale & 

I Way Stations. 


6 :10 p.m. 


10:30 a. m 
G:05p,m 


7:45A.M.f8:00A.M.|Guerneville. 6:10 p.m. 


6:05p.M. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs; at 
Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at Cloverdale 
for Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Bartlett 
Springs, Ukiah, Vichy Springs, Navarro Ridge, 
Me ndocino City and t he Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 75; to Santa Rosa, $3; to 
Healdsburg, $4; to Cloverdale, $5. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, ?1 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2; to Healds- 
bu rg, $3; to Cloverdale, $4 50; to Guernevine,|3. 

From San Francisco to Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:45 a. m., 9:15 a. k., 11:30 a.m., 
3:30 p.m., 5:00 P. M., 6:15 P. M.; Sundays: 8:00 a.m., 
9:30 a. m., 11:00 a. m., 1:30 P. M., 5:00 P. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20 a. M., 8:00 a. M.,9:30 a. M., 12:45 P.M., 3:40 P.M., 
5:05 p. M. ; Sundays: 8:10a. m.,9:40 a. m., 12:15 p. m., 
3:30 p.m., 5:00 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50 A. M., 8:25 a. m., 9:55 A. M., 1:10 p. M,, 
4:05 p.m., 5:33 p. m. ; Sundays: 8:40 a. M., 10:05 a. m., 
12:40 P. M., 3:55p.m., 5: 30 P. M. 

H. C. WHITING, 
Superintendent. 



PETER J. MCGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



mr TICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves San Fran- 
cisco and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 
LANDING as follows: 

4-f\f\ p. m., Daily (Suuday excepted), from 
.KJyj WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF, for 
the Town of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 
Returning, arrives in San Francisco at 9:00 A. M. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8-H O A. M. (Sundays only), from WASHING- 
.ItJ TON-STREET WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Return- 
ing, arrives in San Francisco at 6:00 p. m. Round- 
Trip Tickets to Sonoma, ?1; Glen Ellen, $1 50. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Superintendent. 



PETER J. MCGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

__ TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

S. S. Acapulco Monday, Jan. 16th, at 4 p. m. 

S. S. Colima Wednesday, Jan. 25th, at 10 a. m. 

For Ports of Call See Guide. 

Fare (oNew York-CaMn, 980; Steerage, 

$35 

Passengers booked through to and from Europe 
by any line. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 
City ofSyoney . .. Saturday, Dec. 31st, at 2 p. m 

1888. 
City of Rio de Janeiro Saturday, Jan. 21, 2 p. m. 
City of New York. Saturday, Feb. 11, 2 p. m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner Firstand Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H. Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 7. 



Jan 7, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



WORLD. FLESH AND DEVIL 



A tine glfttt vmm', ju-t discovered in an 

Etruscan tomb ftt Bolonga, Is <>i s sea- g raft 
color, like a soda water bottle, thick ana «>f a 
unique form, with two handles. It is nine 
inches Inch and without ornamentation. There 
is uol ;i smxte delect, Saw, crack <>r chip about 

it. With it was round BO ivory chair, made 

attar the fashion <>' :i modern camp stool, 
having all its screws and rivets still in per- 
fect condition, and a small casket containing 
beads and some vi-ry eteganl articles in bronze. 
The arttelee arc supposed to date from the 
fifth century. The tomb In which they wece 

found was closed at the top by an enormous 
globular mass of stone as fresh as if it had 
only been fashioned yesterday. 

— afr.. Jesse Etaworth has jusl presented 
to the British Museum the chessboards and 
some of the chessmen of Hatshepsu, daughter 
ol Thothmxs i. of Egypt. This carries us back 

■ years before Christ. Hatshepsu was 
a lady of sonic character. She donned man's 
attire, assumed a male prefix or "handle" 
to her name, mounted the throne in her 
brother's place, and ruled vigorously. It was 
rather through accident than any virtues of 
her own that she did not till in Egyptian his- 
tory some such place as Richard I'll, does in 
the history ,»f England. 

— — Dr. Gross, of Geneva, has, in the inter- 
cut of medical science, carried out a series of 
experiments upon himself to ascertain how 
death is produced by hanging. His experi- 
ments seem to establish that the sensations 
are neither agreeable nor disagreeable, his on- 
ly feeling being one of warmth and burning 
iii the head, and there were no convulsions. 
We are afraid he did not carry the experi- 
ments fur enough. 

——At two London churches "eminent" 
actors have recently been invited by the in- 
cumbents to read the lessons from the read- 
ing-desk. In both cases the histrionic gentle- 
men have acquitted them selves to the thorough 
satisfaction of the audience— the congregation 
— and a great success has been obtained by the 
new sensation. The performance will be re- 
peated every Sunday till further notice. 

The total capital which is employed in 

the manufacture of explosives throughout 
Germany is estimated at $0,250,000. The total 
quantity of explosives manufactured is about 
6,000 tons per annum, representing a value of 
from $2,500,000 to $3,000,000. Only about one- 
third of this production is consumed in the 
country, the rest being exported. 

The Dean of Cork questioned a furrier 

in that city as to the present state of trade the 
other day, and received the significant reply 
from him that he had never before sold so 
many seal-skin jackets and costly articles of 
that sort as henad done during the current 
year, the purchasers of them being farmers' 
wives and daughters. 

— Princess Maud, the daughter of the 
Princess of Wales, is credited with a very 
thoughtful saying. Observing her father and 
mother hurrying to get to some bazaar that 
they had promised to open she remarked, " It 
must have been much nicer to be Princes and 
Princesses in the days when there was nothing 
to open." 

— The Duke of Abercorn has sold to 
his tenants in Tyrone and Donegal, under 
Lord Ashbourne's Act, land to the value of 
$1,500,000, and by this transaction about 300 
tenant farmers become owners of their hold- 
ings. The farms were bought at twenty years' 
purchase, based on the ordinary valuation. 

^— It is considered very probable now that 
the British Home Government will agree to 
advance the sum of $750,000 to the Govern- 
ment of British Columbia for the purpose of 
assisting the emigration of crofters and fisher- 
men from the north of Scotland. 

■ A Scotch paper, describing the funeral 
service for Lord and Lady Dalhousie in 
Brechin Cathedral, states that after the ser- 
mon, " the congregation joined in singing the 
dead march in ' Saul.' " 

The Emperor of Brazil has been obliged 

to abandon his projected trip to Egypt in con- 
sequence of the precarious state of his health, 
and he will pass the Winter at Cannes. 

The Duke of Norfolk's personal Jubilee 

offering to the Pope will be a donation of 
$50,000 to Peter's Pence. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave, «nd nre Due to Arrive at, 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



From January 1, 1888. 



LRSIYl 

(froml 



. Callstoga aud Napa 
Colfax vhi Ltvermore 

(.Jail via Martinez. 
. c May ward?. ati>] Nile*. C 



. Hay-wards c 



[one via Livermorc. 

.Knight's Landing 

Ltvermore and Plcasauton. 

1- s Anil's, Demi up. El I'asoAEast 

Los Angeles ami Mojavc. 

Milton. 

. Ogden and East. 

Ogdeu and East. 

Red Bluff via Marysvillo 

Redding via Willows 
Sacramento via Beuicla ! 

" via Beulcia 

" via Ltvermore. . .. 

" via Benicia 

" via Beulcia 

" via Benida 

Sacramento River Steamers 
.San Jose 



. Santa Barbara 

.Stockton via Ltvermore. . . 

" via Marti aez 

Siskiy ou and P o rtland. .. 



10:10a. 
i. in p. 
.v.-iu p. 

11:10 A. 

12 10 p. 

3:40 r. 

8:40 r. 
•8:10 a. 

2:40 p. 

5:40 !'. 
10:10 a. 
•8:40 a. 

6:40 P. 
11:10A. 
♦5:40 p. 

8:10 a. 
10:10a. 

5:40 P. 

6:10 P. 

8:10 a. 

0:10 P. 

5:40 p. 
10:40 a. 
10:10 a. 

7:40 a. 
•6:00 a. 
*S:40p. 

13:40 P. 

8:40 P. 

9:40 a. 

11:10a. 

5:40 p. 
11 :10 A. 

7 :40 A. 



a. Tor Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays excepted. 

JSundays only. 

c— Take ferry train and change cars at East Oak- 
land. 



Standard Time furnished by LICK OBSERVA 
TORY. 



A. N. TOWNE, 
Gen. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen, Pass, and Tkt. Agt, 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 

To EAST OAKLAND— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To 23D AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— Same as "To 
East Oakland " uutil 6:00 p. m., inclusive, also 
at 7.00, S:00 and 10:00 p. M. 

To FRUIT VALE— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 
3 :30, 4 :00, 4 :30, 5 :00, 5 :30, 6 :00, 8 :00, 10 :00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *9:30, *2:00, 6:30, 
12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30, 10:00, J10-.30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00, 112:30, 
1:00, 11:30, 2:00,12:30,3:00, 3:30, 4:00.4:30, 5:00,5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To BERKELEY— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30. 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30,10:00, J10:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00,112:30, 
1:00, 11:30, 2:00, 12:30, 3:00, 3:30,4:00,4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— Same as " To Berkeley." 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. 

South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 

Pauengcr TraliiK Leave SUtlou Foot or Market 
Street, 901 in Sii.K. at: 

IDAY8 ONLY) - Bud ten' 

Train t<> SAN JOSE, btopplogatall 

arrive in Ban fraud 



4:00 



way Htailnun — returning 

• 1 " 20 P. M. 

8-iPZ k. M. dally— For Alvaradn, Newark. <Vn 
■ lc -' trevllle, ilviso, Sail t» Clara, BA» 
Loa Qatos, Wright's. Qleuwood, Peltoo. Boulder 
Creek, Big i r,w», sa.n i \ OBI / and all way »ia- 

tillllS, 

2.1F5 r. M. (except Sunday), F.xpreps — Ml. 
• 1CJ Eden, Alvaradn, Newark, Centervllle, 
Alvixi. Aguew a, Santa Clara, SAN JoSK. N,,w 
Almaden, Los Oatos, and all stations to BANTA 
ClU'Z and Boulder Creek. 
A--IR P. K. deily— For SAN JOSE, Los Gatos 
" ,lu and intermediate points. 
CTO EXCURSIONS to SANTA t'KI'Z and 
■P° Hni LDEB i'HEEK, on SATURDAYS and 
sr.NHAYS, in return ou MONDAY. Inclusive. 

$1.75 to SANTA CLAltA and SAN JOSE and re- 
turn. Sundays only. 

LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 

From San Francisco to Oakland and Alameda, 

Daily : 

$6:15— $6:15— }7:15— 7:45-8:15— 8:15 — 9:15— 9:-)5- 

10:15—10:45—11:16—11:15 ». K.— 12:16— 12:45— 1:15— 

1:45— 2:15— 2:46— 8:16— 8:46— 4:16— «:46— 5:16— 6:46— 

6:15— 6:45— 7:80— 8:30— 9:30— 10::t0— 11:30 r. m. 

To San Francisco, Daily: 

From FOURTEENTH aud FRANKLIN Streets, 
OAKLAND : {6:46— vli:15-$0:4.'i— 7:15— 7:45— 8:15— 
8:45-9:15-9:45-10:15- 10:45-11:15-11 :45 a.m. 12:15- 
12:45— 1:15-1:45— 2:16— 2:45-8:15— 3:45-4:15— . 1 :45- 
5:15-5:4.5-6:15-6 :45-7:3O-8:30--9:3O- 10:30-11:30 p.m. 
To San Francisco. Dally: 

From HIGH STREET, ALAMEDA— 55:31— $6:01- 
$6:31-7:01-7:31-8:01-8:31—9:01—9:31—10:01—10:31- 
11:01—11:31 A.M. 12:01—12:31 — 1:01—1:31—2:01— 
2:31— 3:01— 3:31— 1:01— 4 ::n— 5:01— 5:81— 6:01-6:31— 
7:16—8:10—9:16—10:16—11:16 p. H. 

{Sundays excepted. 

Ticket Offices, 613 MARKET STREET, under 
Grand Hotel, and Rotunda Baldwin Hotel, Sau 
Francisco. 
L. FILLMORE, W. T. FITZGERALD, 

Superintendent. G. F. aud P. Agt. 

S. P. C. R'y Div. S.P.C. R'y-Dlv. 



To "SAN FEANCISCO," Daily. 

From FRUIT VALE— 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 8:50, 9:20, 
*10:19, "2:49, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 8:50, 
10:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *5:21, 6:51, 
19:15, *2:38, «3:15. 

From 23d AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— 6:55, 7:26, 
7-55, 8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25, 10:55, 11:25, 11:65, 
12-25, 12:55, 1:25, 1:55, 2:25. 2:55. 3:25, 3:55, 4:25, 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 10:53. 

From EAST OAKLAND— *5:S0, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12 30, 1-00, 1-30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland— 7 minutes later 
than from East Oakland. 

From ALAMEDA— *5:25, 5:55, *6:25, 6:55, »7:25, 7:55 
•8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, 110:25, 10:55, 111:25, 11:55, 
112-25,12:55, (1:25, 1:55, 12:25, 2:55,3:25, 3:55,4:25 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 

From BERKELEY— *5:25, 5:55, *6:25, 6:55, «7:25, 
7:55, »8:25, 8.55, 9:25, 9:55, 110:25, 10:55, 111:25, 11:55, 
112-25, 12:55, tl:25, 1:55, 12:25, 2:55,3:25, 3:C5, 4:25, 
4-55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 



From WEST BERKELEY— Same as 

KELEY." 



'From Ber- 



Creek Route. 
From SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15,3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 



♦Sundays excepted. 



X Sundays only. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 2 o'clock P. M.. for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. — 1888.— From San Francisco 

(Touching at Honolulu}. 

Oceanic Wednesday, Jan. 11, 1SS8 

Gaelic Wednesday, Feb. l, " 

Belgic Tuesday, Feb. 21, " 

San Pablo Tuesday, Mar. 13, " 

Oceanic Tuesday, April 3, " 

Gaelic .' Saturday, April 21, " 

Belgic Saturday May 12, " 

San Pablo Saturday, June 2, " 

Oceanic. Thursday, June 21, " 

Round Trip Tiokets at Reduced Rates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Towuseud streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street, Union Block, San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 

G. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 7. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian aud Colonial Mails 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Folsom 
street, 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Magnificent 3,000-tou Iron Steamer 

Mariposa. Thursday, January 12th, at 9 a. m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 
For Honolulu: 

S. S. AUSTRALIA (3,000 tons) January 31. 1888 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS& BROS., 
Jan. 7.1 General Agents. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



"NATURE VS. ART." 
A Pedant once a ragged urchin task'd, 
To answer straight this simple question asked: 

" Now, say, my child, if I five birds should see, 
Perched, in a cluster, on a gate or tree, 
And I forthwith a murd'rous gun should take, 
With dire intent their thread of life to break; 
Suppose I fired,— the charge its course hath sped, 
And of the Jive, three on the ground lie dead. 
Thus seeing" three of life have been bereft, 
Say, little boy, how many birds were left? " 
As o'er his visage passed a waggish smile. 
The boy, thus questioned, pondered for a while. 
Then, with becoming gravity, replied, 
And thus essayed this problem to decide: 

" At figures, sir, I am not very bright, 
So if I'm wrong, pray kindly put me right; 
Still, to my mind the answer seems quite plain 
That of the five you'd find just three remain." 

" How," cried'the man, if three were killed at once? 
Take three from five, can three remain, vou dunce?" 

" Yes, sir, there can, though I've not had much school," 
The boy rejoined. " 1 don't think I'm a fool; 
If three were killed, the other two would fiy; 
Three must be left, so you're the dunce, not I ! " 
« * * * * 

The scholar paused, looked grave, to move began, 
If not a better, still a wiser man ! 
San Francutco, January 7, 1888. l. g. w. 

THE '88's. 

The new year will be one of important centennials. For the past 
three centuries no '88 has gone by without witnessing some event of 
world-wide moment. In 1788 the ratification of the Constitution 
converted the United States from a helpless, vacillating and despised 
confederacy into a mighty and dreaded nation. In 1688 the English 
Revolution checked the last attempt of despotism to suppress consti- 
tutional liberty in Great Britain, and gave freedom a rallying point 
from which it gradually spread over Europe. In 1588 the Spanish 
Armada threatened to make the rule of the Inquisition the law of 
the world, and its destruction in the same year saved the conquests 
of the Reformation and transferred the empire of the sea from Spain 
to England. It is impossible to name three events which have had a 
more tremendous effect upon subsequent history. 

The American Constitution became the law of the land by the rati- 
fication of New Hampshire, the ninth State, on June 21st, 1788. Be- 
fore that time there was practically no such thing as the United 
States. There were thirteen neighboring republics, ranging in import- 
ance from the present rank of Liberia to that of Guatemala. Thej r 
enjoyed the blessings of protection against all the world, including 
each other, and were steeped in primitive squalor and misery. Credit 
was dead, and the sense of civic honor almost so. There was no 
national feeling; the Continental currency had been repudiated, and 
the same fate was hanging over all the public debts and many private 
ones. The Union was a persistent beggar at the courts of its Euro- 

?>ean friends. It seemed only a matter of a few years until it should 
all back into colonial dependence or into anarchy. The Constitution 
raised the country to power, prosperity and the respect of the world. 
For England the two centennials she will celebrate this year are at 
least as important as ours is to us. One of them, at least, is equally 
important to America. If the Armada had reached the shelter of an 
English harbor, if the invincible Spanish infantry had marched to 
London, there would never have been a United States. Kew England 
would have been only a northern province of New Spain. The same 

Eower that extended its possessions from Cape Horn to Georgia would 
ave extended them to the Arctic. The United States would have 
been simply a larger Mexico. If the revolution of 1688 had ended 
differently, it is possible that democracy in this country would still 
have survived. Perhaps it had taken root by that time sufficiently to 
grow of itself. But it would have had a perilous youth, with the 
chances of utter extinction. The '88's decided the future of the 
whole English-speaking race. 

WHAT IS IT? 
There is an unholy fascination these days in walking behind a 
woman on the street. That Thing flips-flops, wiggles-waggles, teeter- 
teeters with a wierd, unearthly motion. Straflge visions pass before 
the mental eye. You recall the perky little wagtails which, when a 
boy, you persecuted with a gun, and the dormant sportsman instinct 
is roused. You yearn for the gun again, and the tortoise-shell han- 
dled pocket knife with which your amateur dissections were prac- 
ticed. You want to rip up one of these Things, to investigate its 
innards, and learn what makes it Hip and waggle so. Some day there 
will be a deed of darkness done on these thoroughfares. The mortal 
part of a female hideously mangled wUl be discovered, and specula- 
tion will dislocate itself in the effort to account for the horror. Yet 
the simple fact will be that that some man, tormented beyond endur- 
ance by this mystery, has investigated it, in obediance to his natural 
instincts, with calamitous results. Solely with a view to averting 
this tragedy, we put the question here and now: Is it clockwork, or 
have we bred a new kind of Venus? If so, let the Thing be publicly 
exposed to view, with the machinery attached and in operation, and 
probably a female life will be saved. Not that the last is so much of 
an object, in view of a certain redundancy which statisticians claim 
to discover in the article, but we shall be spared the accounts of the 
business by the daily press. Perhaps some woman now teetering on 
the brink of suicide, to whom life is no object, will present herself an 
offering to the investigating knife. The suspense that is now tor- 
turing us is cruel. In this single respect, woman's inhumanitv to 
man is making uncounted millions howl. They have nightmares 
and are pursued by Things which teeter at them threateninglv, and 
wiggle till the victim breaks out in cold sweats and is waited up 
strangling. The present state of affairs positively cannot go on. 
Under a strain and a stress such as this, life is not worth living. 



I35TSTJK,^_35rCE. 



DAITG-EBOITS. 

DANGEROUS INVESTMENTS 

Are often made in Real Estate through the buyer assuming a title to be 
good, because he is familiar with it. 

THIS IS NOT SAFE. 

Remember, good sense is not always good law. Fatal defects may exist 
in a chain of title, notwithstanding good lawyers and searchers have passed 
upon it. You may obtain 

AN ABSOLUTE GUARANTY 

That your title is perfect on record, and it will cost you less than is paid for 
an abstract and an attorney's opinion. Apply for information at the office 
of the 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 



No. 206 Sansome Street. 



TAKE NO KISKS.- 



[Jan.7. 



BRITISH AND FOREISN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Nov. is J No. 31 6 California Street, San Francisco. 

ALL THE POLICIES OF THE 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF BOSTON 

ARE PROTECTED PROM FORFEITURE BY THE 

NEW MASSACHUSETTS NON-FORFEITURE LAW. 

Tne Company indorses the liberal and yearly Progressive CASH SUR- 
RENDER and PAID-UP INSURANCE values prescribed by the lawin full in 
tabular form on every policy, thus giving the policy the convenient form 
of A BOND OF YEARLY INCREASING VALUE, and the Policy-holder may 
thus at any time know the precise value of his Policy. 

gj^~ Before insuring in auy other Company, or joining any Co-operative 
Assessment Society, consult auy local agent of this Company, or the un- 
dersigned, HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

March 26.] 324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Principal Office 416 California Street 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital $ 750, 000 

Assets, Over 1,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co, of California. 

officers: 

GUSTAVE TODCHAED. . President I J. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

JaS. D. BAILEY Secretary. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street, San Francisco. 

JAMES DRTJMMOND MACPHEBSON, Manager. 

London Office — No. 2 Royal Exchange Aaenue, Cornhiil, E. C. [March 5. 

AN6L0-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, s2, 000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

Bankers: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[Sept. 10.] 

AMERICAN STEAM BOILER INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF NEW YORK CITY. 

CAPITAL AUTHORIZED $1 .000.000 

CAPITAL PAID UP $600,000 

Policies cover all loss or damage to PROPERTY or LIFE resulting 
from Explosion or Rupture of Steam Boilers. Inspections quarterly 
by Skilled Inspectors. 

CONRAD & MAXWELL, 

(Fire and Marine Underwriters,) 
Aug. 27.] Gen' I Agts. for Pacific Coast, 421 California St. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

CAPITAL $1,600,000.00 

SURPLUS 214,210.18 

ASSETS, Jan. 1st, 1886 1,192,662.21 

INVESTED IN the U. S 601,856.48 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky 
Mountains. [Dec. SI. 



Jan. 7, 1SSS. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






TRUE FUNERAL REFORM. 

You oan do a good deal of work In Florida (for example) without 
producing mncfa effaol on the social and industrial condition of Ala- 
Ikuim Now. Florida b not morewidel] Mpamtad, either In si 
timi'. from Alabama than Boothern California i* from Middle Gall* 
fornia ; and Middle California i* no farther separated, either in gpaoe 
or tiriu-, from Northern California than Atnttuma is from Kenkurky ; 
and is no farther from Oregon than Alabama is bom Ohio. These 
topographic distances arc not important, bul the separations of local 
character which they imply are very highly so. At the close of the 
i ivil War. St. Loots Waa a larger and more Important place than 
Chicago; since then »'hicago has become a city, and St. Louifl re- 
mains a town. The change has been wrought, not by topography, 
hut by the people of the two places. " Cuanto rate et hombre. (onto pom 
*u fwrrn," as who should say, What the man counts for, thai much 
hui country counts for. It used to be said that what St. Louis want- 
ed was a do/en first-class funerals. They have had the funerals since, 
but they did not come off in time. St. Louis will always remain a 
town now. It may and will grow larger, but it will be a town all the 
same. Just as Philadelphia is one. There are two cities in America 
New York and Chicago. There once promised to be two more New 
* >rleans and one on the Pacific Coast. There promises to be one on 
the Pacific Coast still. Hut where? Not onlv was Philadelphia once 
a larger place than New York, hut only a few years ago Liverpool 
was much larger than Glasgow; now Glasgow is by 60,000 souls 
larger than Liverpool, and is hauling ahead of it at the rate* of 10,000 
a year. The natural advantages of San Diego over those of Glasgow 
are enormous. Has San Francisco, as the port of the Pacific, a real 
natural advantage over San Diego? Duhitatur. Asiatic traffic tends 
to seek the shorter lines north; South Pacific, the shorter lines south. 
No doubt San Francisco will become " considerable of a place," but 
will it he the city of the Pacific Coast, or oidv the biggest town? At 
present it is a village, and a nasty one. Would funerals do it any 
good? 

APOSTLES OF CIVILIZATION. 
The brutal Crusaders brought back with them, as a result of their 
contact with the Asiatic, civilization, social morals and decent man- 
ners, it is odd that California has been so long in contact with the 
Chinese without adopting somewhat of their riper civilization. At 
the least, it would seem that the habit of personal cleanliness might 
have been borrowed. There is no Chinese but passes a competent 
part of each dav in washing his person. A Chinese never gives odor. 
Get into a Third streetcar when well filled with population that lives 
south of Marketstreet, you strangle — positively strangle — from theef- 
flnvium of the human body. The Chinese frequent this car line; no 
one ever smelt one of them. It is odd, too, that the Fankwei merchant 
has not caught from theirs the simple trick of telling the truth. The 
Chinese merchant, of course, never fails of keeping his engagements ; 
but this is a trait only to be developed amongst us later on, in the 
course of two or three centuries. It is to be led up to by first acquir- 
ing the art of speaking the truth. The Jews, who are shrewdest as 
merchants, have no small skill this way. But the first step toward 
the art is to quit lying. This reform is not, probably, beyond the 
compass of the Gentile moral nature, but only beyond that of Gentile 
intellect. Most of us are willing not to lie, if only we had wit enough 
to get a living without it. We cannot filch the Chinese their acuter 
intellects, but it would seem that some of the brighter among our 
young people might be able to learn from them something as to mak- 
ing a worthier use of such brains as Nature has given. If a few 
Chinese merchants could be induced to receive promising specimens 
of the young barbarian for training, these would afterwards return to 
their own race as a sort of Apostles of Sweetness and Light. In a few 
generations this influence might do for us as much as the Saracen did 
lor the older Northman and Frank. 



ECONOMIC HEEHAW 
The indefatigable Mallock person goes on write— write— writing 
about Wealth and the Working-classes. In a practical way, it seems 
probable that the dirty-minded parson knows as much of one as of 
the other. He himself is manifestly not a working-class, while a 
guinea a page for writing about them hardly fills the common ideal 
of wealth. The substance of the airy fairy William's discourse ap- 
pears to be that the working classes remain poor because they fail to 
acquire wealth ; and further that they fail to acquire wealth because 
they remain poor. From these premises the conclusion seems logical 
that a working class in a state of poverty is part of an order of things 
which inheres in their own nature; and, in conclusion, that this sort 
of thing is worth a guinea a page. The nature of things is always a 
fascinating theme, and we are drawn by it to ask what there is in the 
nature of theological study that smites with permanent paralysis the 
human ratiocinative faculty? Now and again a tinker or a black- 
smith turns preacher and not only becomes agreat preacher but may 
remain a great man. He has not studied Divinity, and pulpit oratory 
alone does not necessarily impair the mind. Nor could there be any 
exception taken to brother Matlock's pot-boilers but for the fact that 
the relation of Wealth to the Working classes is a problem of acute 
interest to the working classes. It is a problem they are fain to study 
and to try and find out something about. When they read brother 
Mallock (as some of them will), they will not be imposed on but they 
may be exasperated. They may infer that the parson speaks in some 
sort for Wealth, and so justly fall into an attitude of lively hate 
toward the wealthy classes. Now, class hatreds are not a good thing; 
and therefore on the ground of public utility Mallocks who slop over 
into periodicals ought to be breeched. So ought the editor who prints 
his slops. 

1,000 Different Kinds 
Of useful Christmas presents for $5 and upward. Come and see for 
yourself. Chadbourne's, 741, 743 and 745 Market street. 

Burglars are not in the habit of exclaiming, "Give us arrest," but, like 
everybody else, they would like to be arrayed in the exquisite Underwear 
sold by J. W. Carmauy, No, 25 Kearny street. 



TasrsxTRA-asrcE. 



HANKS ALLi-TUE OLD RELIABLE 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK. 



A. B. FORBES. 

GENERAL \«,KNI FOB Mil PACIFIC COAST, 

214 8ANSOME STREET. 






THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

BWTTZBBLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Praaoa. hi.i.vkiia of at 

Gall— Capital, lO.OOO.OOOFrRtiiv HALOlSEol Basle- Capital. ,000,000 Franoa 
three oompanlei are liable Jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Loaaea made payable In all the priinipn) seaports <•/ the 
world, in tin- settlement ■•( ull claim* under an English poller, the 
panlex will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted al i 
and Mihmltto English Jurisdiction. HAKKY W. SYZ, ajeat, 41U California 
street, San Francisco. [Juni 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

-F-cirie j^isrip :m:.a.:rj:et:e. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full S 200.000.00 

ASSETS. January I, 1887 446.611.09 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized. 1,681.849.61 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
ChaS. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 



(Safe Deposit Building). 



[March lu.] 



San Francisco, Oal. 



A66REGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000. 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Corporation of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867. J 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
WM. MACDONALD, Ass't Manager. 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 



THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL 110,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent, 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cai. (March 19. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2.764.376 

Cash Assets In United States 1.398.646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March 20. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1884. 

Principal Office ^ .nsurance:"" 2 ' 5 SanSOme Street 

Capital Paid Up In U. S. Gold Coin. $300,000.00 

Assets January 1, 1887 f780,f>06.22 I Reinsurance Reserve .. .| 220,979.66 

Surplus for policy holders.. 774,784.22 Losses since organization. 2,&88,106.80 

NetSurplusfoverev'ryth'g) 253,754.50 I Income 1886 361,132.44 

F OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON... President I CHAS. R.STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, . .Vice-President I R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, 
J. L. N. Shepard John Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauucey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryl and, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 5. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
United States Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab, 1 824. J 
American Fire Insurance Co, of New York [Estab. 1857.] 
Western Assurance Company of Toronto, Canada [Estab. 1851,] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.) 413 California Street, San Francisco. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
FIBB .A-ICsTD ZMZ-A-ZR-UDsTIE. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 SANS0ME STREET, 

Sa-rl Francisco, California. 
A J BRYANT, CHAS. H. CUSHING, RICHARD IVERS, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Directors— A. J. Bryant, C. D. O'Sullivan, J. M. Donahue, P. 

J White James D. Pheiau, D. Callaghau, M. Mayblum, E. L. Goldstein, L. 

Cunningham, H. W. Scale, Fisher Ames, Dr. C. F. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Jones, 

Geo. H. Wheaton, T. Mc Mulliu. Sept. 24. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed *','S™ 

Capital Paid Up ■ 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (Inaddition to Capital) ?'i^'2?n 

Total Assets July 1, 1S87 5.809,629 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
July 16.] 305 California Street, San Francisco. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



MAYOR HEWITT'S EXAMPLE. 

Ivlayor Hewitt, of New Yofk, continues to 
set an example that the Mayor of San Fran- 
cisco might well follow. Hewitt is not con- 
tent to discharge his duties in a merely per- 
functory manner. He is chief magistrate of 
the city, and has a very intelligent sense of 
what the situation demands of him. The law 

fives him no control over the quarantine of- 
cers, they heing State officials appointed by 
the Governor, and owing no allegiance what- 
ever to the city or its Mayor. It seems that 
there, as well as here, the quarantine is utter- 
ly ineffective, and might as well be abolished 
for all the good there is in it. The moment 
Mayor Hewitt realizes the facts, he makes 
them known to the Governor in an open com- 
munication, couched in such terms that no 
official dare ignore them. No law imposed 
upon the Mayor the duty of writing such a 
letter, but he saw that the* health and well be- 
ing of the city of which he was the chief mag- 
istrate were involved, and he forthwith exer- 
cised his undoubted right of calling attention 
to the facts. He has not waited for a conta- 
gious disease to become actually epidemic, but 
clearly foreseeing the possibility of such a de- 
plorable contingency, he has aroused public 
attention by a statement of the case, which 
Governor Hill and his subordinate officers dare 
not ignore. Active preventive measures are 
bound to follow. There is no withstanding 
an honest and capable Mayor strongly en- 
trenched in the public confidence, and it is 
not the least of Mayor Hewitt's merits that he 
realizes that fact. He is stronger than the 
Bosses and knows he is. He is the master 
and superior in power of the subordinate of- 
ficials, and whenever necessary makes that 
fact abundantly clear. Whenever the law 
fails to give him power he invokes the great- 
er strength of public opinion, and carries 
his point every time. He has made himself 
respected all around. Although he had no 
control over the Police Commissioners he has 
made them enforce the laws without fear, fa- 
vor or affection, and, as a consequence, most 
marvelous reforms have taken place. He had 
no authority to interfere with the execution 
of the laws against pauper immigration, but 
when New York was threatened with the 
landing of a lot of very undesirable beggars, 
he employed special counsel, and compelled 
the United States courts to do their duty. If 
he had been Mayor of San Francisco the Fed- 
eral Judges would assuredly not have been 
permitted to nullify the restriction act in the 
way in which they have. He would have 
shown that the city has some interest in that 
matter. If he had been President of our 
Board of Health smallpox would not to-day 
be epidemic in San Francisco. If he were 
given the power — as our Mayor is— of over- 
hauling the various municipal departments, 
he would exercise it, and give us a wonderful- 
ly more honest and efficient Government than 
we have. San Francisco has an honest and 
well-meaning Mayor, but the trouble is that 
he has further political ambitions and is afraid 
of the Bosses. Strong in the public confidence 
as he is, if he had but the courage of Hewitt 
he would be the next Governor, with the con- 
sent of all good citizens. 



If the recent examination of Jurymen be 
any criterion, the insanity plea is not now as 
likely " to go through " as it once did. The 
roaring farce of a man being perfectly sane 
a moment before and a moment after he com- 
mitted murder, and a raging maniac whilst 
he was engaged in the operation, lis about 
" played out. ' The next thing to extinguish 
is the plea of self-defense on the ground that 
" he made a motion as if to go for his hip> 
pocket." 

That privileged contractor, M. J. Kelly, 
has again been oearding the City Hall Com- 
missioners, and made them do as he told 
them. He wanted an advance on all the ce- 
ment he had on board ship, on all the bricks 
he had burnt, and on all the clav be had to 
make bricks with, and, although Architect 
Laver protested, he got pretty nearly all he 
asked tor. Kelly is a power. Cause why? He 
votes his men early and often. 

"And why are you so surprised, Mr. Samp- 
son," she said, drawing herself up with hau- 
teur, " that I play the piano so well?" " Be- 
cause your hands are so small, Miss Smith, 
that you must find it difficult to atrike an oc- 
tave/' Then she played some more for him. 



Frauds in Porous Plasters 

Those who cannot originate, imitate, 
and all so-called Porous Plasters are only 
fraudulent imitations o£ ALLCOCK'S. 
If you want the genuine article, be certain 
not only to ask for 

"ALLCOCK'S" 

but look well at the Plaster and see that this 



Trade 




Mark 



is on every one. None are genuine without 
it. 



\A/ AMTF |™\— Reliable parties to introduce 
VV/-4IN I t-L^ the Hartsfeld Automatic coii- 
tinuous and improved eeouomical Coke and Char 
coal Oveus of auy capacity. Also, latest improved 
portable reduction works aud prospecting hand- 
power diamond bit rock drill that will bring up a 
solid core 500 feet. 



New Water Jacketed Cupola Furnace, 



KEIM'S new 
Water Jack- 
eted Cupola 
produces supe- 
rior castings, 
with a saviug 
of a laborer 
and four per 
ieutofa saviuer 
in metal and 
fuel. It is espe- 
cially adapted 
for the use of 
tove, brass 

and iron 
founders, also 
for the treatmeutiof^phosphor-bronze, copper and 
bell metal. It is so" constructed that it requires 
little if auy repairs, aud the bottom need not be 
dropped for months. Estimates furnished for 
portable reduction works, for the smelting of gold, 
silver, lead and copper ores. Assaying and An- 
alizing promptly attended to by the best of chem- 
ists. 
Your correspondence is solicited. Send stamp. 

THE HARTSFELD FURNACE CO. (Limited), 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

BOX 459. [Nov. 12. 





cMACHINfi^ 



The latest improved and most rapid Type-Writing 
Machine. It stands at the head. Send for circu 
lars, price list, and book of testimonials to the Es 
tate of SAMUEL HILL, Pacific Coast Agent, 735 
Market street, Bancroft History Building, San 
Francisco, California. [Sept. 10. 



WALL PAPER ! 
WINDOW SHADES! 

THE LATEST DESIGNS IN 

American, French and Japanese Wall Papers. 

Interior Decorating and Frescoing a Specialty. 

G. W. CLARK & CO, 

645 Market Street. 



"IT IS ALMOST HUMAN." 

"TheNorton" 

Door-Check and Spring, 

Closes Doors Without Slammiup, 

For sale only by 
FRANK D. MOERELL. 
June 4.] 224 Market street, near Front S.F 




MOUNT VERNON CO., BALTIMORE. 

t&~ The undersigned having been appointed 
AGENTS FOK THE PACIFIC COAST for the sale 
of the manufactures of above company, have now 
in store: 

Sail Duck— all Numbers; ' 
Hydraulic— all Numbers; 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From SO to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete As- 
sortment of All Qualities 28J^-Inch DUCK, from 
7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 
MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



JOSEPH G/LLOTTS STEEL PEJUS. 

Gold Medal, Parle, 1878. 

MStf" These Pens are "the best in the world." 
Sole Agent for United States, MR. HY.hOE. 91, 
John Street, N. Y. Sold bv all Stationers. [Mc. 12, 



SGHRAMSBERG WINES! 

Made from the Pure Juice of the Grape. 

Stored for Years in My Sub-Mountain Cellars and Bottled Under 
My Own Supervision. 

THESE WINES ARE NOW FOR SALE RY MY AGENTS, 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

272 Market Street. 

Beware of Imitations. Corks and Capsules Bear My Name and labels that of My 
Agents. J. SCHRAM. 



Jan 7, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






NO!' LOST. 
Tin* look t-f lympttby: the gentle wonl 
Bpoktii bo low thai "iilv uige] baud; 
l li. -ivrtM url of purr 
On— bo by im-ii. boJ marked by angel's «yes: 

Ulan an not i"*t. 
Tin- Bacrad nude ol ;t tender "train. 
Wrung from ;i post's, heart by grief mi«l pain, 
And chanted timidly, with doubt ami fear, 
To busy crowds, who scarce!] panja to ttaar: 

These are not lost. 
The silent tears that full at dead of night 
Ovat soiled robes, thai once were pure and white; 
Th*- prayers that rise like incense from the soul, 

LODfCing for Christ to make it clean and whole: 

Tbej«o are not lost. 
The nappy dreams thai gladdened all our youth, 

When dreams had teas Oi self and more of truth; 

bildhooda faith, bo tranquil ami BO sweet, 
Which sat like Mary at the Master's feet: 

These are not lost. 
The kindly plans devised for others* good, 

I. BO little understood; 
The quiet, steadfast love that strove to win 
Some Wanderer from the ways of sin: 

These are not lost. 
Not lost. O Lord! for, in Thy City bright, 
Our eyes shall see the past by rlearer light, 
And things tons hidden from our gaze below 
Thou wilt reveal, and we shall surely know 

They were not lost. 

UNCLE SAM'S MONOPOLY. 

It is rather curious that the anti-monopoly zeal that bubbles over 
in investigating commissions and inter-State commerce laws has 
nothing to Bay to tin- gnat postal monopoly maintained by the Gov- 
ernment. It is ii..t enough that the operations of the Post-Office De- 
partment are backed by the unlimited resources of the nation, and 
that deficits which would bankrupt an ordinary corporation in a 
year are annually balanced by appropriations so lavish that competi- 
tion is put at an almost hopeless disadvantage. Competition is not 
only discouraged but forbidden. Before Wells, Fargo & Co., can car- 
ry a letter they must pay the Government as much as if it had per- 
formed the service, and the privilege of carrying mail matter even on 
these terms has been threatened with .suppression. Having intrench- 
ed it-elf in an unassailable monopoly the Post-Office Department has 
proceeded to develop alt the typical monopoly vices. X'nder every 
administration of every party, "stupidity una churlishness have reign- 
ed in postal affairs. If there be a long, complicated and unsatis- 
factory way of doing a simple thing, the postal authorities invariably 
find it, but "their chief delight is to do nothing — to accept the customers' 
money and render no service in return. Every special delivery stamp 
bears the legend : " Secures immediate deliverv at a special delivery 
office." But instead of securing immediate delivery it does not se- 
cure any delivery at all, unless the sender happens to know that the 
regulations require a two cent stamp to accompany it. A two cent 
stamp alone will carry a letter to its destination; a ten cent special 
delivery stamp alone merely takes it to the Dead Letter Office. Not 
long ago a letter which its writer considered of peculiar importance 
was mailed in Oakland, addressed to San Francisco. The writer had 
inadvertently paid the Government only ten cents for it instead of 
two or twelve. The letter accordingly reposed in the Oakland Post- 
office for a week. At the end of that time the Oakland Postmaster 
sent a card to the person addressed, informing him that a letter di- 
rected to him and bearing a special delivery stamp was held for post- 
age, that upon the prompt receipt of a two cent stamp it would be 
forwarded, but in default of which it would go to Washington. As 
the person thus favored had learned the contents of the letter some 
days before, he made no haste to reply, but later, when he happened 
to "be in Oakland, he called at the Post-*. 'ffice, described his property, 
and asked for it. "Have you the notice with you?" asked tne di- 
vinity who presided at the "general delivery window. The delinquent 
confessed that he had not. " Then 1 can't give you this letter,' con- 
tinued the goddess, kindly but firmly, " but if you'll give me a two 
cent stamp, I'll mail it to* you in the city." The humbled inquirer 
tendered the money, but was imformed that no coin transactions 
could be undertaken. He proceeded tractably to the stamp window, 
bought a stamp, handed it to the genius of the general delivery de- 
partment, went home, and that evening he got bis letter. 

In smaller towns there is no pretense or observing the Govern- 
ment's promises on the special delivery question, even when all its 
absurd conditions have been observed. In San Jose a high-school 
boy consents to help out the Post-office on its contract during his 
leisure moments after school. Such special delivery letters as arrive 
during the day, and cannot be conveniently handled by the carriers 
on their regular trips, are allowed to accumulate until the amateur 
messenger has loaded his daily cargo of knowledge, and are then dis- 
tributed to their anxious owners. In San Francisco the exigencies 
of politics have reduced the postal system to chaos. Letters con- 
tinually .go astraj', and generally succeed in losing themselves so 
effectually that tr±ev are never heard of again. Not long ago a pack- 
age of letters, meant for San Francisco people, was sent from this 
city to 6an Jose. Among the rest was a communication addressed 
to the Post-master of San Francisco. The San Jose authorities in- 
dorsed it, " Inquire at San Francisco," and sent it back. 

In view of the abnormal capacity of the present postal system for 
producing blunders, it might not be a bad idea to modify the mo- 
nopoly principle to which the Government is wedded. If free com- 
petition were permitted, it might have a tendency to brush some of 
the cobwebs out of the mouldy recesses of the postal mind. 

" You make me tired," as the wheel said to the wagon-maker. 



SJ^JST JOSE REAL ESTATE. 



FILLMORE TRACT 



B \< I, iintaicd aboul tiikkk W \ rr<.m 

Ban June, coutaiuiug 

800 ACRES, 

Hax been lubdlvlded, as pyr map on flla In our o(11cc, la tract* of from 7 
to 40 Acrex, aud placed iu our bai 

FOR SALE I 

Prices range from *100 per acre and upwards, according to location. 

TERMS— 2B per oent Cash: 25 per cant additional within «0 daya, and 
the remainder on or before two > i am, al B p6l cut. per i.umim, 

MONTGOMERY, REA & CO., 

(IN< olil'ORATBD) 

Real Estate Aoents, 
Hot, 26.] No. 7 Wes t Santa Clara Street, San Joae. 

BARGAINS IN SAN JOSE. 



When You Visit the Garden City, Don't Fail to 
CALL ON THE WELL-KNOWN FIRM, 

"W. G-. HAWLEY & CO., 

WHO HAVE A CHOICE LIST OF 

Orchards, Vineyards, Unimproved Lands and CityLots. 

CONVEYANCES TO SHOW PROPERTY FREE. 
Oct. 8.1 55 WEST SANTA CLARA STREET, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

J. E. RUCKER & SON^ - 

Old Established and Reliable 
REAL ESTATE A-O-ElsTTS. 



They have a large list of choice property iu Santa Clara Couuty, Including 

ORCHARDS, VINEYARDS. RANCHES, CITY AND SUBURBAN 
HOMES, LOTS, ETC. 

Always pleased to show property and answer correspondence. 

Office, Under City Clock, 

SAN J08E, OAL. fNov. 5. 

Heyler, Dennis & Co., 

HAVE A LAHGE LIST OF 

CITY AND COUNTRY PROPERTY, 

Which they offer at Great Bargains. Call on them before you buy. 
No. 41 West Santa Clara Street, San Jose. 



G. B. STAMFORD. 



W. F. FOSS, Notary Public. 



FOSS & STANIFORD, 
REAL ESTATE AGENTS, 
21 North First St., San Jose, Gal. 

CALL OZTST 

PURDY & FANCHER 

For Choice Bargains in Real Estate, 

Room 4, Over California Restaurant, 
Oct. 1.1 Cor- Mark et and Santa Clara Sts. , San Jose, Cal. 

B. F. BRANHAM, 

REAL ESTATE BROKER, 

50 South First Street, San Jose, CaL 
;oct. 8.] 



2t> 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 7, 1888. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

Lord Clanrikarde has evidently entered into a contract with him- 
self to embarrass the Marquis of Salisbury's Government in Ireland. 
This nobleman is a " horrible example " ot bad landlordism ; he is so 
utterly vile, in fact, that Sir Michael Hicks-Beach told him, last year, 
that unless he dealt more liberally with his tenants the Government 
would furnish him with as little assistance in carrying out his evic- 
tions as possible. The noble Lord has not changed any in the time 
which has intervened. He has not become anymore liberal or hu- 
mane than he was a year ago. He is as grasping, avaricious and 
conscienceless as ever, and be has just taken out about a hundred 
writs of eviction, which he intends to have fully executed. Will Mr. 
Balfour be his ally in carrying out this purpose? If so he will become 
a participant in what his predecessor and colleague regarded as an al- 
most criminal outrage. On the other hand, if he refuse to make the 
" Queen's Writ" run, he will stultify himself and his colleagues and 
the policy which they stand for. Lord Clanrikarde may be a hard, 
grinding landlord, but nevertheless, if the Conservative contention 
in regard to the Irish land question has a leg to stand upon, he has a 
right to his pound of flesh if he chooses to ask for it. The land is 
his property, and he has entered into a contract to give the use of it 
to certain people for a specified rental. Those people having tailed 
to pay the rent he has the right to have the process of law to dis- 
possess them, and, if possible, to recover that which is owing to him. 
If the Conservatives move an inch from the position which is here 
outlined, they will, in effect, admit that their whole contention is 
wrong, and the policy which is based upon it necessarily an erro- 
neous one. To admit that there may be equities which would modify 
a landlord's right to the rent which his tenant has promised to pay 
opens up a case for discussion in regard to every individual Writ of 
Ejectment. The course pursued by the Government in regard to 
Lord Clanrikarde will be watched with interest. 

There seems to be a disposition among press writers to regard the 
fact that Gladstone has gone abroad in search of health as a virtual 
admission that the cause of Home Rule is hanging tire and stands no 
ch;rnce of meeting with any success during the coming session. It is 
difficult to see what facts there are to support this theory. Of course 
we all know that Home Rule stands no cnance of being adopted by 
Parliament before there is an appeal to the constituencies, but at the 
present time the prospects of an appeal to the country are not so 
very remote. A recent writer in the Court Journal says: " It seems 
certain that there will be a split in the Conservative ranks on the 
question of fair trade. That the young and old Tories will, on this 
matter, part company and ask for the approval of constituencies one 
after the other, as they become approachable, or at a general elec- 
tion, whenever that occurs. Possibly it maybe hurried on prema- 
turely." And apart altogether from the question of fair trade, there 
are a'number of other topics in regard to which the Conservatives 
are liable to quarrel among themselves; and then the support of the 
Liberal-Unionists is always uncertain and unreliable. Again, the 
Conservative policy in regard to Ireland is by no means certain of 
indorsement by the House. Upon their representation that the pur- 
suit of a certain course would produce certain results, they received 
from Parliament last session an extraordinary delegation of power, 
and now they will be obliged to admit that they have not secured the 
results they promised. That Parliament should be dissatisfied under 
these circumstances would not seem to be unnatural, and a calm sur- 
vey of the whole situation does not indicate that the Marquis of Salis- 
bury and his colleagues are bound to have a walk-over during the 
coming session. In fact, we are inclined to take an entirely opposite 
view of the situation. 

The condition of affairs in Europe is unsettled, but it is not one 
which must necessarily lead to war either in the immediate or re- 
mote future. The differences between Germany and Austria on the 
one side and Russia on the other, are differences as to their respect- 
ive shares of plunder in the changes which have been long preparing, 
and are now thought to be coming to hand, in the Balkan Peninsula, 
and these differences can readily be adjusted without righting. The 
present ostensible array of Germany, Austria and Italy against Rus- 
sia is an array of three bandit powers against a fourth. Advantage 
will probably be taken of the apprehensions excited to endeavor to 
make the British Government join the Austro-German-Austrian 
confederation. Well informed and patriotic people, however, trust 
that this effort will not succeed. Tb* business of England was never 
more clearly to keep out of entangling alliances than it is now. 

. A St. Petersburg correspondent asserts that the number of troops 
massed during the autumn in Poland amounted to 250.000, and that 
a similar force will soon be assembled on the frontier of Galicia. It 
is, however, asserted in the highest military circles that these mea- 
sures are only precautionary , in order to be •"' prepared for all eventu- 
alities/' as a high Russian' staff officer expressed himself the other 
day. It is urged by the same authorities that bad road communica- 
tions in the interior of Russia cause the movements of the troops, by 
constant delays in the transport, to assume vaster proportions than 
thay really have. It should also be pointed out that the authorities 
in Berlin and Vienna are kept in constant information of all that oc- 
curs on the other side of the frontier, through a vast and organized 
body of spies, chiefly of Jewish nationality. 

Another correspondent, whose sources of information are very re- 
liable, writes from Constantinople to the effect that Turkey is secret- 
ly, but most vigorously, pushing ou the defences of the Bosphorus 
at the Black Sea entrance, and that the work has been taken in hand 
on a hint from Prince Radowitz, the German Ambassador. More- 
over, German military engineers are largely employed in the work. 
It is asserted, on indisputable authority, that quite recently the 
diplomatists took the opportunity of pointing out to the Sultan that 
the relations of Germany and Russia were no longer what they used 
to be, and that Turkey had better look to her defences. There are 
those who assert that this bint will have the effect of Turkey joining 



the Triple Alliance. The greatest activity also prevails in Turkish ar- 
senals in getting the Navy into lighting trim. 

Russian finances have for years past been in a wretched condition, 
and they are not improving any. The Novosti, in a recent article, 
discussing the account of the Imperial Comptroller in connection 
with the Budgetary estimates for 1888, which nas just been issued, 
calculates the deficit at 84,000,000 rs. The Budget is balanced in ap- 
pearance with a surplus of 15,406,289 rs., but this surplus, the writer 
explains, is composed of extraordinary income over and above extra- 
ordinary expenditure, whereas the ordinary revenue and expenditure 
supply the only criterion of the state of the Budget and of the eco- 
nomical condition of the country. The income of the Budget for 1888 
from all sources is 960,429,550 rs., against an expenditure of 945,023,- 
281 rs., but the ordinary income amounts to only 783,000,000 rs.,as 
against an expenditure of more than 832,000,000 rs., thus leaving a 
deficit of about 50,000.000 rs., or 9,000,000 rs. more than the deficit of 
trie previous year. The other 34,000,000 rs. of the deficit estimated 
by the Novosti is made up of various items, criticized by the writer, 
in the so-called extraordinary expenditure. Of course, it is to be 
borne in mind that this insolvent condition does not cripple the Rus- 
sian Government as it would cripple the United States Government. 
Russia can get along without money. 

flPPLETON'S AMERICAN CYCLOPEDIA, 



THE ANNUAL FOR 1886 NOW READY. 



THE AMERICAN CYCLOPEDIA presents a complete view of all 
human knowledge as it exists at the present moment, containing an 
inexhaustible fund of accurate and practical information on every 
subject. A household which has the American Cyclopedia can claim 
to have an excellent library in all departments of knowledge. 
D. APPLETON & CO., Agents, 

3 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION 

TO 

OVERCOATS ! 

Manufactured expressly for M. J. FLAVIN & CO. 
by the best Manufacturers in the United States. 
For finest trimmings, cut, style and quality of 
material, our 

OVERCOATS 
Are attracting the attention of all well-dressed 
people. As we have made special efforts in the 
Overcoat Department this season, showing the 
largest assortment ever placed on the counters 
of any single clothing house in the United States, 
we simply crush out competition in the matter 
of prices for 

OVERCOATS 
In English Kersey, Chinchilla and Meltons. We 
are headquarters. 



M. J. Flavin & Co, 



024 TO 928 MABKET STZRIEIEJT- 



All Garments Marked in Plain Figures. Strictly One Price. [Jan. 7. 

STEAM BOILER INCRUSTATIONS. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

Llewellyn Filter-Heater and Condenser! 

(Over 300 in Daily Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering tne Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded ou Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. [Sept. 11. 



DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California aud the Pacific States, 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, ?1 25; 
of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, $3 50; oT 400 pillsr?6; Preparatory Pills, ?2. 

Send for Circular. 



vol. xxx y 111. 



Number 30. 




<£n lif ornfinX M s ttx srcr. 



OtVOTtO TO TwS LtAOtNQ INTERESTS OP CALIFORNIA ANO TH€ PACIFIC COAST. 
Print* ■' ' ' ' , !i:ri'i:i:ii'K Mahuiott, 

i iption, 
. 

■ matlt r. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, IS88. 

THE BUSINESS OFFICES of the S. F. NEWS 
LETTER U<n, been removed to Market and Fourth Sts. 
Building, where orders for advertisements and subscrip- 
tions "ill i>c received and communications should be ad- 
dressed. 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



An intelligent mining man, whose experience dates back through 
all the vicissitudes of California life to the palmy days of '49, takes up 
the cndgel in behalf of practical vs. scientific mining, and in reply to 
an apostle Ol the latter creed, writes as follows : 

"A truculent, scientific prodigy, writing from Iowa Hill to the 
Placer County Republican over the signature ol " Betsy J.," criticises 
mining operations in that county, and miners in general, as follows: 
•All that the drift and quartz mines of thi-s divide need is capital com- 
bined with intelligent energy, to open them up under the instruc- 
tions of some good engineer. The miner- of '-10 and '50 think they 
know as much about deep channel mining and where to start a tun- 
nel as any one else, and ignoring the experience and knowledge of 
mining engineers and geologists, decline to pay the small expense of 
an engineer's report on the ground of economy or poverty, but general- 
ly on account of their egotism." 

It must be humiliating to the men who have originated and con- 
ducted legitimate mining operations in California for nearly forty 
years to discover that they are too stupid, or have entirely neglected, 
to acquire any knowledge of the sciences applicable to practical min- 
ing, either theoretically or in a practical manner, and utilize it. Are 
these men a lot of stupid egotists as represented by the correspond- 
ent of the Republican! That is the question ! 

The sciences most pertinent to mining operations are, mechanics, 
geology, metallurgy and mathematics, but the intrinsic* value of their 
knowledge is nominal only until applied practically with due regard 
1 1 parative experience. With but few exceptions, all the most 
extensive and successful mining enterprises upon the Pacific Coast 
were originated and are being conducted by non-scientific men, but 
who evidently, during their efforts at practical mining, mastered 
more or less of the sciences named, and sufficient to compete success- 
fully with the older mining knowledge of Europe. And why should 
not the scientific attainments of a competent mining engineer also be 
acquired by a person of even ordinary intelligence without graduat- 
ing as such? 

The writer of this fully appreciates the valuable services of a proper 
M. E. when needed and circumstances will permit, but denies that 
his services are indispensable to but a very small number of mining 
enterprises. Space forbids further remarks upon the relative posi- 
tions of mining engineers and miners." 

in response to the insipid criticism of the Republican's correspond- 
ent, who not unlikely owns some big loquacious brother, who, having 
taking a few lessons in an assay office, is now thirsting for notoriety 
and fat jobs as a full-Hedged M. E., we could quote a number of perti- 
nent denouements in " Betsy J.'s" vicinity as a basis for the miner's 
critic to ponder upon. 

One' case in point is of recent date, where a number of competent 
mining engineers examined and surveyed exhaustively, at a heavy 
expense, the divide above and below Damascus, and also the exten- 
sive underground workings of the deep gravel mines in the vicinity, 
comprising a eravel range of say seven miles in length by three miles 
in width. Quite a number of unsuccessful attempts of tapping the 
gravel in that portion of the divide had also been made in early days, 
and added to the facilities to determine the approximate locus' of the 
gravel channel and the proper depth for a tunnel. A principally pos- 
sessory and questionable title had been acquired by two or three per- 
sons for some four or five miles of the chosen ground for the benefit 
of the present owners. Then the now Red Point tunnel was started, 
and supplied with plenty of capital and choice of modern machinery, 
The tunnel was calculated, by those in authority, to be under the 
pay gravel channel when 3,000 feet in length. When in some 2,500 
feet an upraise of 105 feet was made to tap the gravel. At nearly 
3,000 feet another upraise, higher than the first, was driven to look 
for gravel. The results were discouraging, so another upraise was 
made within about 1,500 feet of the mouth of the tunnel, and reached 
pay gravel in 45 feet. And yet the same " Betsy J." proclaimed the 
wonderful feat that certain eminent mining engineers nad struck rich 

Say gravel in the Red Point tunnel, exactly where they had pre- 
icted that it would be found." Comment is unnecessary, but if 
other similar samples as the foregoing are desired they can be had. 

The Comstock market has been variable during the week, with a 
decided falling off in the volume of business transacted. At the 
south end, Yellow Jacket has been gradually strengthening up, on 
the reports of a development on the 1,100 level. This is generally 
believed to be really in the Confidence ground, into which this level 
extends some forty feet. The importance of this ore bodyis admitted, 
and there is consequently every reason to believe that higher prices 
will yet rule in the shares of these mines. The middle mines have 
been agitated more or less under flying reports of a contest for the 
control of Norcross. There is little doubt now that some amicable 



arrangement has been made betwei n the rival cliques, which will re- 
sult ndvantageonsh to all concerned, Hay ward and Hobartwill mill 
tin- ore. while the Jones party retains the control. Dealers, a- a rule, 

were in hope* that a lively war Would break out. M it would tend to 

liven up business on the street for the time being. The north end 

>toek> have been weak for some da\ - past. Coll. Virginia drop] 

$ls in face of the largest monthly "hip men I ol bullion which l. i 
made since tin- re-incorporation ol the two mines. This can only be 
ascribed to manipulation, as the mineisstilj reported to be loosing 

well. At the BOUth end. the. 1 looking well, and so i- the 

lental. Little is heard al present From Grown Point and 
iltbough all hope Is nol ye\ given up ol a development on the 
500 level of the former. The present condition of the Con. Imperial 
allar, to Bay the least. Out of the 500.000 shares in the mine, 

185,000 shares have found their way into the treasury through delin- 
quent assessment Bales, The 05,000 shares scattered among dealers 

are now quoted at $3.75. At this rate, the mine is selling for J I 
000— more money than is asked for any other mine along the lode, 
exclusive Of Con, Virginia. Such a system ol unwarranted in fiat ion 

is absurd and should oe broken up at once. The Alta mill hat been 
closed down, and another attempt is being made to find ore in the 
mine. If the stockholders in this mine arc- willing to in- humbugged 
in this manner, they deserve t" be salted for every dollar they pos- 
sess. It is nearly a year since the announcement was made that suf- 
ficient ore had been accumulated to warrant the erection of a ten- 
stamp mill. Month after month has been wasted in putting up a 
botched affair, which can either not work the ore, or has no ore to 
work on. Under either circumstance, if the shareholders were actu- 
ated with a spirit above that of down-trodden slaves, they would arise 
in their might and oust this i neon i pet ent and unreliable management. 
Dealers in this stock, and others under the same control, have been 
victimized for years, and this latest outrage should lead to an investi- 
gation, which would result in a general smash up of this rine. 

The leading Tuscarora stocks have been strong during the week, 
and Commonwealth has again crossed the $-1 mark. The shipments 
from North Belle Isle continue with regularity, and the pulp assays 
are now running up as high as $204 to the ton. in the Nevada Queen 
the work of development is progressing with renewed vigor, pending 
the arrangements for fitting milling facilities. The 100-level of Com- 
monwealth is now being opened up by a north drift following the 
vein, which is three feet thick in the face. About the latter part of 
this month some new arrangements will be entered into by this com- 
pany in connection with some new ground in the vicinity which has 
been recently acquired. 

Mr. Lloyd who has recently investigated the Valley Cold Mine, on 
behalf of 'the shareholders in the company, will shortly return to 
England. He goes back to inform the persons whom he represents 
that the statements of the News Letter in regard to this property 
were correct in every particular. With a lack of courtesy he has re- 
frained from admitting as much personally to ourselves. " This little 
omission is, however, excusable on the ground that one can hardly 
be expected to confess that himself and associates have been the 
laughing-stock of a community which is at all times inclined to be 
merry at the expense of dupes. For our part, without the slightest 
sympathy for the fools who thought fit to sneer at advice and drop 
their money, this matter will not end here. Newspapers and private 
individuals have been sued for libel on account of our remarks on 
this mine, and now the whole facts of the case must come to the 
light. We want the names of those who were stockholders in the old 
Rfojave Gravel Company before it was transferred to the English 
company. We want to "know whether it is not a fact that Del Mar 
and some members of his family were holders of stock in this 
incorporation at the time it was being floated in London. Furthermore 
the correspondence between Senators Stanford and Jones in relation 
to Del Mar's official connection with this Government, which it is gen- 
erally understood had much to do in establishing confidence in his 
statements abroad. This is a matter for the consular representative of 
the British Government in this city to determine, whether or not 
Del Mar is entitled to assert in London his connection with this 
Government, for the purpose of furthering a scheme like the Valley 
Gold. If Mr. Lloyd is correct in his view of this property, as re- 
ported to us, not a'more rascally piece of business has ever been per- 
petrated. 

A hegira of mining men is threatened from the Pacific Coast with- 
in the next few weeks. The London season is opening, and present 
appearances indicate the revival of a better feeling in the mining 
business. The experience of the past year in several ventures will 
satisfy the most credulous investor, who is ready at all times to be- 
lieve the promotor of some wild-cat scheme when he explains away 
some adverse newspaper criticism with a whine of blackmail. Nine 
times out of ten the man who defends himself by this blackguard at- 
tack on a paper which is fulfilling its duty to the public, is a thieving 
scoundrel, who depends for a living in confidence operations among 
an unsophisticated class of people, who can be bluffed into any belief. 
An honorable man, with honest intentions, has nothing to fear from 
press criticism. He will not be found connected with any disrepu- 
table schemes. On the other hand the unprincipled adventurer in- 
variably attempts to repel attacks on his petty larceny game by the 
cry that they are simply made for a sinister purpose. English invest- 
ors have had a little experience of this in the past. Let them profit 
by it in the future, and in accepting the timely warning of danger 
ahead save their money. Not an investment from the Pacific Coast 
which has been offered on the foreign market for years past but has 
received a just criticism in this column, and investors who have lost 
money by ignoring our advice are entitled to little sympathy from 
any source. 

We have received a letter from the resident manager of the Ibex. 
It is prettystraightforward, and while admitting our modest impeach- 
ment as to his watchful care over personal comforts, it has a ring of 
honestv, which carries conviction that the interests of shareholders 
will be'fully protected, even if a mansard roof is a vital necessity. It 
is to be hoped that the recent development in this mine will reward 
the gentleman for his labors in the past, and impart a more gentle 
and amicable tone to his correspondence in the future. 

If the persons who have been inquiring about the specimens given 
to Whitney will send a description of them to this office, the investi- 
gation will be pressed in another quarter. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



WET WEATHKK- 

J ha 

I do 

■ 

In my 
i, • ,■■ •[<■■ bJed that I do no 
t| )( -„, rood deal abo 

■ ■ . ..•■ ■...-.■■■ 
|, spared fo sin '>f tbe winter? 

mbrella 

, ' of the J 

phernalui frorn their growful repose with tbe grate Wo n 

. ■ 
-,;.-,-> felt tfa ild only hold 

ild not matter bow hard 

i red ■ ■ 

... dWaVS 

i , fall on the 
:< and rulnin, 
.,, from i'1'iv, 

win, Itcarrb 
■ ■ i l rog tl 

■ 
. ■ 

{form on the pane before 
hem [/turned pall 

■ 

while; 
■ ■ ■ 

umbrella, wh 

|m ih -I to thi ■ 
lo .ii town and look "i bar, In all net m 

I ;.)t. Tell 
then - - tl.-- wav In which a woman 

■ 

loppy underfoot, and thai 
\,,. t ,i. . :; dc m rfptlon 

o| hei m thi eats In a note! reading room 

i mlnni if fin ln« u thoroughfare. I 

n menl l>i Vernon once 
■ ellngs when 
■ 

do mo 

■ 

ho ■■ rubber 
' Tin 

, q 

dot ten cenl i ullco 

Ing the 

advent <-' the clan plaid and the Dolly Vorden r agarics, Interpreted 

mi the . ■ hence, ci In the 

along the 

■ ' he in tli to blm 

time fun," He at om pnssi Ion ol thai 

The go • otil Into tfhat might be 

i ii nol u " the word. It's 

the i [ilthc I applfi tl to u all filled oul b i 

all but scud 

ml mated club 

oi looh t tin i". amei any rirotei ; ■■ otin a 

'i tj .v.. rd nil i pro [<' ' ' Ive bower, to leni 

f - r day, I 

agon. I will 
i a mint, or in I ; rain i uplionl th 

ol iom« ei 
no. never, My '' :i ' j ■' 0D ' ' nation taught me 
. i , i .,(,,< vhal partial to i ubbi 
I .. imI tin df«peuK«r ol lacteal fluid) who ride i along tbe 
mill vhnt In Lliooghl ol ■■' rubber coat. 'I lie man ol tin can 

In rely oncoDed In rubbei m ml , th< 

■ Lhan mm ai all, it i turfacc wo Impel vlou to 

.■■. ould on a ihaggy 

■ In rii'. tuns riould rcadil bi hal i n . the rvatei all 

ran down Into the ■ igon i ii Before he anew It, the driver would 

i a pool ii i the aine with n go a 

mei PL '.]. ii am thi 

. tm bl.i ■' ' i ■ o|» up the lunci ilclo ol i be i Ircular 

■ m and i m ,■ drcs ' t*i roi v ui foi table to feel 

it topi, I wlsn women wore leggings 

1 i!i '' ti ■ ■ i iii...-. Dme ld< a on dre i efoi m but 

of thai ' hi ny on tin l .■■■ <■ ai I»i Vbii •■■■■ 

.... out horc 
Do] n d in oui ■ ""i o'vban ' 

Ho i - to tap the Bi It! ib gore 

nol o /bun '"ii ■ -"'I ■ ■' 
Lei III ton William bunt hli bole 

1 1 1 i. i now a brol i n bowl ' 

in .I, ii h,n. charm i [Cngland soul 



I lool o'vban, our Bool \ ban 



/:.,,,/. n. 



Wm ft Kelt] Do Imvi bought the Went End Pharmacy, con 

not ol Mi kill tut and i lllioore, and will maintain It a n ill il oh i 
i' |)tloi fully compound* d. 



Opl ci ml 



. ui i h, Ion i I ad .•'!■■ od rati Muller's 



"TO OBLIGE BENfeON." 
If the present honest administration at " • ould Infoae 

• - ifif. tbe aamloletraUre ex- 
oi tbe 

- and 
Counts would probably revive from 
tbefr normal r:/mdition ol tnnoi ide The ofnefah here 

'. - ':or..|.i;i'< (1 t u, the man Bei 

'-'I Willi biro with familiarity from day U> 

day; they lunched and wined and dined wltta bim ;i^ if be ware one 

of tbem .<■'. ten. He moved in and around tbe offices u if be wei 

ofti'ial of the firxt rank. Department ■ nown to ordinary 

rj tiiin ;%: the lij'bt of day. lit; WBM kiiowo to 

ngton 
Reamed perfwrtly phenonienaJ. WTien dimcalnee began to loom op, 
be treated thi ed of iti<- money i 

mad»- for pub) If: men, and claimed that there wai not power ei 

down bim." I or a time It looked ai if there 
were mi He went 

mountoin of 
criminal Indd to appal bim o cbeek 

t/* blanch, Me felt himself fortified as a man behind the throne, 
than the throne UoeU, Bat evil days drew nigjb. There 
turned out to be a Icc-nle . tbal be bad not 

wo much a : dream) oi Com ml deck, Zach, 

Montgomery, in tin 
. faithful !"■• 
of tbe ;•■ - 't he ramffli 

operatloi hem and make 

them plain to tj.<- ptiblir: ootid, I'.ut that Wfl bed at laMt, 

and now tbe facts are too well known \s> permit oi things being 
ed np without danger to soi rbe removal of the faith- 

■'■•. late. He did his work well and left behind 
■ ■ public Enterei t. 
, . no longi i ■■■ tin l ■ bfnett to help the 1/ Ii i 

hf:i bad a pull upon blm oi fooled him t 
ously, Thi In earni '. The 

rnmenl has been put forth, and Ben- 
ion t.;> been ;ur>. ■■■■■; In Copenhagen, and now there i fear and 
II along the line, !"■ 

n not a few exalted places. The coin In certain 
e to melt away, and men may be 

But IF In tlci Is not to be cheated ol her doe, and tbi 
pleare to come by tbeli o tboritfen In Washli 

. ngJe moment. : i ontlntie to 

and offlciafs. There are well- 
informed men who 
for the machinei ,■ ol the law. We shall 

Reductions in Prices ! 



Wt n-«i»-'-tiiiiiy aunouna REDUCTION In PB1CBS 

throngboul oui Entire Htocfc, and inrito our Co baII and m« the 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS OFFERING. 



HII.KH 


AT 


RED) ' i.n 


PRICE8 


1 i ' /M..'i'/r; 


AT 


REDUCED 


PBICEB 


FANCY VKI.VI I 


AT 


BEDI 'i.h 


PBI0E8 


liliKHH GOOD 


AT 


BBDI ' ii' 


PRICE 1 


BLACK 000D8 


AT 


REDUCED 


PBIOEt 


. ElY 


AT 


BEDU01 D 


PEII M 


I1I.OVKH 


AT 


REDI I 


PBI0E8 


II0U8K KEEPINfi i.DhliH 


AT 


BEDI CED 


PEICE8 



Ladies' Muslin Underwear 



I.I UUCED PKICES. 



I. II . < f«..|, <«rrliM{c piil'l, In Oaklmi'l, AlftincJn antj Hurkelo]'. 



9mZm> 






<=^ V ^P 


III, II 


, II., I 17, 119,121 POST STREET, 




AMU 


lO, 12, 


14, 16, 18, SO MORTON STREET. 



Jan. H, 1888. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



8 



SOCIETY. 



Cold! isn't it? has betm the salutation between Eneoda and eo- 
gnalntanoea beard on every ride during tlie \>n-i two weeks— and for 
onoe there are none who dUputi the allegation. Our cold spell baa 
■i unusually long an. I severe one, and even those Eastern visit- 
on who generally laugh when we complain of either heat or cold, 
thai the) feel the frost In our temperature as they never fell 
It M at home." It Is soaroely to be wondered at, therefore, thai the 
lawn tennis toarnamenl games have fallen Mat. both competitors and 
spectators beina; conspicuous by their absence from the grounds on 
Saturday last. an. I the advisability of pattponingthem until a" thaw " 
shall have set in Is under discussion by the members, I fear that the 
January* I have heard talked of ever since 1 have been in the State 
when -straw hats Instead ol overcoats were the correct thing for the 
men, lace shawls and fans for the ladies Instead of the furs with 
which they now envelop themselves arc either Munchausen tales or 
months o! the past, and gone forever. This January, BO far, has 

surely been most unlike them. 

The principal recent event In society dancing circles has been the 
Army german at B'naj B'ritfa Hall, on Friday evening of last week. 
The decorations were distinctively of that character, aa were the 
figures danced, especially the one where sabres were introduced with 
an exceedingly good effect. The attendance was large, and the 
cotillion under the leadership of Lieut. Bean, who had Miss .May 
Pope for his partner, was considered to be one of the prettiest danced 
this seas, »n. It is a pity, however, that the fault I have so often 
commented upon ran not" be remedied, I mean the lighting of the 
hall, which never, even under the most favorable circumstances, 
seems bright, and the more profuse the decorations the dimmer is 
the result. 

The Miller wedding receptions, both last week and this, have been 
pleasant little parties, as was also the " party calls" at Mrs. (lark 
Crocker's, when dancing and feasting was indulged in as much as 
though it were a regular party instead of merely the acknowledgment 
of one. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Bandmann always give an elaborate supper, 
preceded by a little dance, on New Year's eve, and their party this 
year partook almo-t ol the character of a gathering of the families of 
the Man's and their own, preparatory to the ceremony which united 
them, and that took place at the First Presbyterian Church on Wed- 
nesday evening last, when Mr. Charles Bandmann was married to 
Miss Ottilia Mail. The Christmas decorations still remained in the 
Church, and it had no further dressing than an arch of snrilax placed 
in Irunt of the reading-desk, from which depended a marriage bell of 
white Mowers, and several palms in pots arranged round the chancel. 
The church was full, though by no means crowded, with guests (who 
were nearly all attired in walking costume) and was in a state of 
semi-darkness till the entrance of the bridal party, which was decid- 
edly late in making its appearance; a sudden rise in the gas, and the 
notes of the Mendelsohn march, simultaneously announcing that the 
long wait was at last over. The ushers, of whom there were three 
— Messrs. Henry Crocker, Will Gage and Percy Rothwell— led the 

S recession, followed by the bridesmaids, Misses Alice Mau, Toney 
aiidiuann and Jenny Martel in pink, and the maid of honor, Miss 
Julia Mau, in while; and finally the pretty bride, in a handsome 
marriage robe of white silk and point lace, with her uncle. Mr. Sad- 
ler. At the chancel they were met by the groom and his best man, 
Mr. Frank Hicks, and the ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. 
Mackenzie according to the beautiful ritual of the Episcopal Church, 
with an accompaniment upon the organ of the bridesmaids' chorus 
from Lohengren. Following the ceremony a reception was held at 
the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. Mau, on Pacific avenue, 
which was beautifully dressed, smilax, roses and chrysanthemums 
being almost exclusively used in the decorations. The young couple 
received the congratulations of their friends in the large* parlor to the 
left of the hall, standing beneath the arch which had already done 
service in the church. Then followed dancing, which was kept up 
till near midnight, when a handsome supper was served. The happy 
pair will spend their honeymoon in Los Angeles, having left for there 
on Thursday morning. On their return they will make their home 
with Mrs. Mau, on Pacific Avenue. 

The inclemency of the weather last week had but little effect upon 
the brilliancy of the festivities consequent upon the wedding of Miss 
Bettie Hays and Mr. John McMullin, solemnized at the home of the 
bride's mother in Alameda County on Wednesday night. The deco- 
rations of the house, which was entirely thrown open, were of the 
most beautiful description, especially so in the parlor, where the cere- 
mony was performed by the Kev. Dr. Ackerly beneath a large floral 
sunshade. Supper, dancing and an inspection of the wedding pre- 
sents, which were both, numerous and costly, followed the cere- 
mony. 

On Thursday evening last the Wallace residence, on Van Ness 
avenue, was the scene of a young people's gathering in honor of Miss 
Marguerite, the eldest unmarried daughter of Judge and Mrs. Wat- 
lace. The entire house, which is a large one, was pressed into ser- 
vice, and prettily, though not profusely, ornamented with Mowers 
and foliage. Dancing was, of course, the rule, and continued until 
quite a late hour. To-day Mrs. Goad gives a matinee tea at her hand- 
some home on Washington street, which will be one of the society 
events of the season. 

A lady friend assures me that never since the bal costume given 
by Mrs. Hall McAllister many years ago, has there been such an ex- 
citement in society over any event as there is at present regarding 
the fancy dress german to take place at Mrs. Willie Howard's next 
Wednesday night. Young ladies, as a rule, seek the office of brides- 
maid as much for the souvenir usually presented by the groom as 
from friendship for the bride. But in "this instance, the desire to be 
included in the cotillion amounts almost to an insanity, owing to the 
report that has got about of the beautv and value of the favors that 
are to be presented, and each young lady hopes to be the lucky she 
who will "be the wearer of the bracelet when the dance comes to an 
end that evening. Every guest is to be in costume, and for some time 



icter " quadruii n prac- 

' ' when the tunc arrive- . 
il n are -aid t" be w 

\v - . a hlcta was to ha 
Iponed until Friday of ueil week, 



past those selected for the " ch ■ 

Uclng diligently, sn as (a |„. ,,, r f, 

and some ol the drenscs thai arc 
their in and novelty ol 

The second of the assembly pa 
last Wednesday night, has been j 
and 1 have beard that a still hi 

;, J -i be s wise thing to do, for the excitement i ol the 

Howard german will scarcely be got over by then, and therefore a 
tttendance is by no ft i ol the 

Art As There Theodore Wores' paintings arc 

lion, has been b fashionable resort during the latter part ol th« 
and one has been sore to meet many acquaintances there, Hugo 
filansfeldt's last recti tl ol Tuesday night, and Miss Alice 

Canning's operatic concert, last evening, have been the musical 
events of this week, but for nexi week there are Beveral on the tapis. 

Among the on di/* of the ful i one regarding another ball that 

those hospitable peo] n .contemplate giving before Lent. 

The whole family are i I ol dancing, and i 

when having a lot of their friends with them to help them to enjoy 
u. Miss Inez Shorn will remain their guest until the close ol the 
winter season. It is said that Mrs, Haggin and Mrs. Tevls, each 
having nieces visiting them from Kentucky, will give parties In their 
honor in tin- very near future, and that Mrs. W'm. T. Coleman's en- 
tertainment will be a theatrical one, to suit the taste ol hi 
son, Robert. Felix. 

WORKS' PAINTINGS. 
When our young and promising artist, Theodore Wores, lefl u 
for a year's residence in Japan, Ins friends had no idea that thi 
jected twelvemonth would lengthen itself Into three years' sojourn 
among the Jans. Nor, much as his talent was then appreciated 
it supposed that he would return so richly laden with the pro 
his talent, observation and genius. For In the thirty-nine paintings 

now on exhibition, Wores has caught and transfixed Upon tin- canvas 

the characteristic detail, the very essence of life in Japan. To pass 
from picture to picture is almost a tour through that island with a 
human guide-book. Some life, street scenes, temples, canals, gate- 
ways, religious ceremonials, all are depicted with a force, strength 
and impressiveness which carries with it the conviction thai tin- 
artist has painted with fidelity. His self ostracism from all society 
save that of the Japs themselves, his complete mastery of the lan- 
guage, his remarkable skill in the facial delineation of an alien race, 
which was already demonstrated by his facility with the moon '■•■ ■ d 
Mongolian in San Francisco, we notice the prevalence of musical in- 
struments. Children abound in his pictures. They play in his gj reets, 
feed the ^reat golden carps; they are acolytes io the venerable priest 
just leaving the '* Memorial Temple of theShogun ESyemitz;" they 
sit near the sacred doves, as the birds are being fed by the priest al 
the ** Temple of shiba." That human nature is the same under all 
skies is depicted by a touch in the " Flower Seller," who, in common 
with all peripatetic venders, seeks to please the mother by giving a 
flower to her toddling child. "A Candy Seller " is displaying his 
wares, to the great delight of the children of all sizes, who evidently 
have been sent out into the street to mind their mothers' babies. 
" ( oming Home from the Cherry Groves " has attracted much atten- 
tion antf favorable comment. The Japanese maiden with the um- 
brella sitS back With the air of a belle, but the little one at her side 
has an expression of " holding on," and as if pleasure and possible 
apprehension were about evenly divided. But it would be impi 
to specify at greater length. The marvel is, that while Wores has 
preserved the type, he has repented himself in no two countenances. 

Miss Hamlin will, it is announced, lecture on the afternoon ol next 
Monday and on Tuesday ami Wednesday evenings, in Irving Hall. 
The subject of her discourse will be " The Land of Bbakspeare," and 
her remarks will be illustrated by some eighty views, colored and 
plain. On Monday afternoon, January 23rd, and on the evenings ol 
the 25th and 27th, she will also lecture on "Switzerland, Through 
Oberland and Savoy." This discour se, too , will be illustrated. 

The Eighth Semi- Annual Report of the Western Addition Liter- 
ary and Social Club has just ben made public, and shows tint the 
organization is in a healthy and vigorous condition. Its roll Bh0WS 
a total membership of 196, and there is a considerable sum in the 
Treasury. The average cost of last season's performances to the 
members was eight cents— which is pretty cheap amusement. 







3$ ,5 s * 



9 



$f 



yirw* 



$ 



P? 0^' ^ >f 



• 



.<¥ 



,p 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



JURIES IN THE U. S. COURTS. 
There is something marvelous strange in the frequency with 
which a certain class of men get on to juries in the United States 
Courts, as well as in the fact that they get there at all. J. C. Bolles, 
who was a member of the late Grand Jury for the U.S. District Court, 
was janitor of the Appraiser's building two years ago, when a mix- 
ture of molasses and lampblack was substituted for a lot of opium 
worth $30,000. How, when and by whom the substitution was effected 
remains a mystery to this day. No arrests were made, no prosecu- 
tions took place, and the Government suffered the loss. John Cor- 
bett, a member of the present District Court Grand Jury, had charge 
at that time of the seizure-room of the Appraiser's building where 
the opium was stored, and from which it was stolen. These two 
custodians of public property were unable to account for its disap- 
pearance, and were permanently relieved from duty. How comes it 
that they, of all men within the jurisdiction of the California District, 
find their way upon Grand Juries that may be expected to inquire 
into the opera'tions of the opium ring? Messrs. Corbett and Bolles 
maybe honest men, but as they lost $30,000 worth of Government 
opium, a sense of the proprieties should have impelled them to ask 
the Court to be excused from serving on Grand Juries, charged with 
the duty of investigating the men in whose interest the opium was 
stolen. The fact that they did not, adds to the suspicious character 
of the circumstances surrounding this very extraordinary business. 
The appearances may or may not be deceitful, but they certainly 
look ominous. Then again, J .'F. Houghton, formerly State Surveyor- 
General, is now Foreman of the District Grand Jury. It is stated on 
good authority that he entered the Surveyor's office a poor man, but 
left it quite wealthy, being possessed of parcels of land in various 
parts of the State. The curious fact is that persons connected with 
the Land Office, to whom Houghton is more or less closely known, 
are, or ought to be by this time, the subjects of a serious investiga- 
tion by the Grand Jury of which, by a strange coincidence, he is 
Foreman. A great deal has happenedin this city in regard to jury 
packing. That the practice lias prevailed, we know, because con- 
victions have taken place. Does it exist around the Federal Courts 
in this city ? We are as sure that it does as we can be of any fact of 
which we have not ocular demonstration. "When we pickup a watch 
operated by a main-spring we are sure that it must have had a de- 
signer. When we see the peculiar constructive skill exhibited in the 
creation of certain juries, we are not at a loss to reach the conclusion 
that there was design somewhere. In the panel from which the jury 
was drawn which failed to convict that old Chinese harridan, the 
other day, there were men about whom the wonder is as to how they 
got there. There was money in that case. The curious coincidents 
in regard to these juries never take place unless there is money 
around. There is no disguising the fact that there is a feeling of un- 
rest abroad in regard to pretty nearly all that takes place around the 
Federal Courts in this city. 

ORNAMENTING THE PRESIDIO. 
Congressman Morrow, in endeavoring to procure an appropriation 
for the planting of the Presidio Reservation with trees, is engaged in 
a good work, in which his hands ought to be strengthened by all the 
assistance his colleagues and his constituents can extend to him. It 
is to be hoped he will not feel dismayed by reason of the coolness 
with which his proposition was received by Secretary Endicott, but 
that he will urge his case with all the more persistency because of the 
opposition encountered. That an economical Cabinet Minister 
should at first sight be opposed to the proposition we can quite under- 
stand. If every military reservation in the country were to be made 
the subject of a like application, the money expenditure involved 
would be large, and in many cases would not be warranted by the 
circumstances. It was no doubt the fear of a dangerous precedent 
that affected the Secretary. But the case of the Presidio Reservation 
in San Francisco stands alone. There is no other military reserva- 
tion similarly circumstanced in all the country. It is a vast, bleak, 
barren waste, almost in the heart of a city that is being rapidly beau- 
tified all around it. The Jackson-street cable-road past the gates of 
the Presidio to the ocean beach is approaching completion. The 
Pacific-avenue extension in the same direction is only a matter of a 
short time. Building is going on along the southern boundary of 
the Presidio with marked activity. Soon there will be no more de- 
sirable private residences in the city than will be found in that 
locality. The Government, in its capacity as landlord, has its duties 
to perform which it may not fairly evade or escape. What would be 
said if it neglected or refused to maintain the sidewalks around its 
public buildings? Why should it allow the Presidio to become un- 
worthy of its surroundings, a disgrace to the Government and a dis- 
credit to the locality in which it is situated? Trees thickly planted 
along its western boundary would break the strong summer winds 
and fogs peculiar to the locality, and would render the military 
quarters much more healthful than they are. In this view of the mat- 
ter, which cannot be too strongly insisted upon, the Government has 
a direct interest in effecting the improvement now asked for. A very 
moderate appropriation, well laid out, would turn the Presidio into a 
park, would beautify one of the most picturesque portions of the 
city, and would greatly ameliorate the force of the trade winds which 
in summer sweep across the peninsula on which San Francisco 
stands. Congressman Morrow must know no such word as fail in 
regard to this matter. 

A razor has been invented which shaves by machinery. This is 
an improvement upon the old style of razor, because it gives the 
barber more leisure, and enables him to inform his customers more 
fully with regard to passing, past and future events. Another ad- 
vantage the machine possesses is the fact that it cannot eat onions or 
endeavor to hide the aroma of a night spent in the worship of Bacchus 
behind a clove. This valuable invention, however, does not in any 
way alter the fact that Bethesda Mineral Water is an effective medi- 
cine as well as a delighful beverage. L. Cahen & Son, No. 418 Sacra- 
mento street, are agents for it. 

The most popular tenner in the Metropolitan Opera House this 
season is a $10 gold piece for a seat. 



THEODORE WORES' 
COLLECTION OF PAINTINGS 



J-^ZP^ITSriESIE SUBJECTS 

Will be on Exhibition at the San Francisco Art Association, 

•43 1) PINE STREET, 

Thursday, January 12th, to Saturday, Jauuary 21st, inclusive, from 10 a. m. 
to 5 P. m., and Thursday and Saturday Evenings from 8 to 10. 

Admission, 25c. The proceeds will be for the benefit of the Sau Francisco 
Art Association. [Jan. 14. 

BANK NOTICE." 

MR. FREDERICK W. TALLANT has been admitted as a partner in our 
firm, to take effect from the 1st of January, 1888. The management will 
remain with Mr. John D. Tallant and Mr. John McKee. 

Jan. 14.] TALLANT & CO. 



MRS. DARLING, DRESSMAKER, 



Having lately secured the services of a well-known French draper, iu 
conjunction with the best of cutters and fitters, is prepared to make 1 
Street, Evening or Stage Dresses, at short notice. 



No. 37 FIFTH ST., San Francisco, Cal. 



fJan. 7. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Navajo Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Tenth day of January, 1888. &■* assessment (No. 18) of Thirty 
Cents (30c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the company, 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Fourteenth Day of February, 1888, will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 6th day of March, 1888. to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 14. 



ft 



ALEXANDRE" KID GLOVES! 



Having been appointed SOLE AGENTS in San Francisco for the sale of 
the Celebrated " Alexandre " Kid Gloves, we take pleasure in announcing 
to the general public that we have in stock complete lines of these Gloves, 
of all lengths, shades and sizes, with plain and embroidered backs. 

That these GLOVES rank as the very finest among all competitors for 
public favor, is fully conceded, they being well and favorably known 
throughout the country for years, as the 

HIGHEST-CLASS KID GLOVE 

sold by the late A. T. Stewart & Co., of New York. 

We cordially invite close inspection of these Excellent Gloves by the 
ladies of this Coast, confident that the Glove will win favor here, as it 
always has, wherever kuown. 



Orders by Mail or Telephone Promptly Executed., 
lioods delivered free of carriage charges in Berkeley, Oakland, Ala- 
meda and Fruitvale. 



1 TELEPHONE No. 3240 T- 




MURPHY BUILDING, 

MARKET STREET, CORNER JONES, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eclipse Extra Dry I 



The Highest jrade Champagx-c 
Equal to tb.3 ~ze$:. 



Jan. 14, 1888 



SAN PRANi l>< NEWS LBTTER. 



FIGHTING THE SMALLPOX EPIDEMIC. 

Editor News Letter: The Board "f Health in ami for tab city and 
county to at beat tweak and Inefficient body, and for two or three 
months paat it baa been weaker end mor»« Inefficient than common. 
It la composed <>f four doctors, who n i\«- nothing fur Lh< 

ind the Mayor, who h« Board. Un- 

der the riew wblen Mayor Pond seems to take »>f his position be Is 
that oaeless appendaae known aa "the fifth wheel ol Booacb." He 
prealdee .it the Board meetings and puts the resolutions which it may 
please the medical members t" propose t*i the vote, and so far as ap- 
pears that bewjns and ends bis Functions. We beueve that to be s 
miataken rtew ol his duty and obligations t«» the city of which be is 
Chief Magistrate. We think thai the purpose of calling In experts 
without pay was that they might act ns advisory members of a Board 
of which the Mayor should be the supervising executive chief, it 
\s.i- Intended, we are persuaded, that he should see that the officials 
gave effect to the resolutions ol the Board, and that generally they 
attended to their duty. In uo other waj can the peculiar constitution 
ol the Hoard be accounted for or justified. At present the Board is 
without homogeneity or effective initiative. The officers l<».k to no 
one supervising mind ; they are independent of each other and prac- 
tically ran themselves. The medical members of the Hoard are in 
active private practice, and have not the time, if they had the incli- 
nation, tq do mure than meet tor an hour or two once a week, and 
advise upon such matters as may be reported to them. As a rule, 
they do DOt Seek to be members of the Hoard at all, but are put there 
by officials who need their votes. They are content with the empty 
honor, and with the cheap advertising which the position brings 
them, and that's just the kind of institution the Hoard is whose gravely 
Important duty it is to fight the smallpox epidemic. 

No wonder that the Board is weak and inefficient and totally in- 
adequate to the demands of the crisis in which it now finds itself. It 
is the mere creature of the officials whom it ought to command. It 
resolves, but they act or refrain from acting just as they please. The 
lamentable results are apparent all round. The smallpox was, in the 
first instance, let in by the shocking supineness of the authorities 
charged with the duty of keeping it out. How, when and where it 
was admitted is perfectly well known to the Board, yet it would be 
admitted again to-morrow in precisely the same way. It is given out 
that Chinatown has recently been thoroughly disinfected and every 
case of smallpox removed. "Nothing can be" further from the truth. 
There are as many eases hidden to-day in the recesses of Chinatown 
as are exposed to view in the restbou.se, the management of which, 
by the way. the members of the Hoard know little. if anything, about, 
and is, we have reason to believe, about as bad as it can be. We say 
it in the presence of not a little exact information, that there are to- 
dav Chinamen afflicted witli smallpox engaged in roasting popcorn, 
to oe sold wholesale to the candy stores, ana by them retailed princi- 
pally to children. There are, or there were at "the beginning of this 
week, four Chinamen engaged in a faetory in Chinatown roiling 
cigars who have the dread disease. The known facts might be multi- 
plied, but enough. The broad fact is that the Board of Health is un- 
equal to the task it has in hand, and if nothing better can be done, a 
meeting of publie-spirited citizens ought to be held to devise more 
efficient measures. Yours, Two Victims. 



THE BOARD OF EDUCATION CHECKMATED. 
The Board of Education has had a tilt with a woman and has 
come out of the encounter second best. Miss Kate Kennedy, for 
many years principal of the North Cosmopolitan Grammar School, 
and a most experienced and capable teacher, was in March last re- 
moved from her position and appointed to another of lower grade, 
and to which $75 per month less salary attached. No charge was 
preferred against Miss Kennedy, and no cause was assigned for her 
removal. It was well understood, however, that the change was 
made at the dictation of somebody having a strong pull upon the 
Boss, and who wanted to advance a favorite at the expense of one of 
the most valued teachers in the department. It is no secret that the 
school department is almost as much under the manipulation of the 
"blind white devil" as any other under the City Government. 
School directors owe their nominations to the Boss, and, moreover, 
most of them have further political ambitions which they expect him 
to gratify. Hence they are about as obedient lambs as he has in his 
fold. If all the truth could be told, it would be found that the school 
department is honeycombed with scandals that are either directly or 
indirectly traceable to this cause. In Miss Kennedy's case, however, 
the intended victim was not willing to be victimized without a strug- 
gle. She refused to be removed without cause, and declined the 
secondary position tendered her, whereupon she was promptly dis- 
missed from the department. She then applied to the courts for a 
writ of mandate to compel the Board of Education to restore her to 
her original position as Principal of the North Cosmopolitan Gram- 
mar School. Judge William T. Wallace has just rendered a decision, 
giving her the writ of mandate asked for and sustaining her on all 
points. He says that "the tenure by which she was to hold her 
place, once having been appointed in the legal way, is carefully de- 
fined by the political code, and the causes for which she might there- 
after be dismissed by the Board, are there enumerated and defined in 
section 1793. The Board therefore had no right to remove her of its 
own will or pleasure. The statute, having prescribed the grounds upon 
which she might be removed, no ex parte proceedings of removal by 
the Board was permissable. The writ of mandate is therefore grant- 
ed, as grayed for, and the Board of Education is directed to restore 
Miss Kennedy to her former position in the School Department." 
Nothing could be more complete than the lady's triumph. In pro- 
curing this decision Miss Kennedy has rendered the department with 
which she has so long and so honorably been connected, a signal 
service. Teachers now have it authoritatively laid down that they 
cannot be disrated, much less dismissed, at the mere whim or pleas- 
ure of the Board. Henceforth efficient teachers will have less dread 
of Bossism and its evil ways. The feeling of safety now vouchsafed 
to all good and trusted teachers has come at a good time, and will 
do much to promote the best interests of the public schools. 



wm MISS SARAH D. HAMLIH, A. M-, 

Will give IUii 1 turn. Illii.lrm.'.l i, 111, th.< i . * | II , .1 ,, .. ■..,, 1,1,1,1 •■ 

Honaay Muni January 10 

i ■ | 

.. ," ..** ,,Z »K'-.».M>. Iliruiigh Nav») mill III < <ll>,. r l n.l . 

Monday Matinee ,,.„, 

Jan 



r the i WO U i rickol, 7 



Friday Svenlog 



can 
Store 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernfa Savings and Loan Society, 

San Francisco, January 4, 1888. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, bold thi.s 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate <it'£% per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six mouths ending December 31, 188", free of all ts ■ 
and payable from and after this date. 
Jan. 7. 1 ROBERT J, TQBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Firemans Fund Insurance Company, 

San FkaNCISCO, January 9, 1*88. 
At a regular meetiugof the Board of Directors of this Company, held this 
day, a dividend was declared, payable on and after January 10, 1888, 
Jan. 14.] WM. J. DUTTON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND No. 148. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar ($1) per share upon its 
capital stock ou January 10th, 1888. 
Jan. 14.J CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Crocker Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Mining 
Company will be held at the oiliee of the Company, room No. 26, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 16th Day of January. 1888, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of Buch other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, Decern by r "2titb,at 3 o'clock 

p. m. AUG. waterman, Secretary. 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 7. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Sierra Nevada Mining Company. 

The anuual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 57, Nevada Block, 
No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fraucisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 18th Day of January, 1888. at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M, 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting 1 . TranBfer books will close ou Monday, January 16. 1888. 

6 EL. PARKER, .Secretary. 

Office— Room 57, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 7. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consolidated 
Mining Company, for the election of a Board of Trustees or Directors to 
serve for the ensuing year, aud for the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting, will be held on 

Wednesday, January 25. 1888, at halt-past one o'clock in the afternoon, 
At the office of the Company, room No. 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgom- 
ery street, San Francisco, Cal. Transfer books will close on Saturday, 
January 14, 1888, at 12 o'clock M. mn „ „ 

Jan. 14. J A. H. FISH, Secretary. 



nire*. »i.uu; Miiik'lr I hk.i, 
now be procured, witho ■ 
5: I. 14.J MAKt'l's) M hbnky, I 

RECALL WAR MEMORIES. 

The 1'anmham \ i „i„i Kara] 

BATTLES OIF 1 VICKSBTTEa! 
O pcudi illy from 9 A. M. to II P. M . corner Mmou and Eddy It] 
f^* Balloona for the Children Lnrday. [Jan. 14. 

GRANT, SHERMAN, THOMAS, SHERIDAN. 

PANORAMA, Cor. Harkal and Tenth su., 
THE BATTLES AROUND CHATTANOOGA ! 
Open dally, (including Suuday) 9 a. h. to 11 p. m. Admission, 80c. 
Children half price. fJuii. II. 

. DIVIDEND' NOTiCE^ 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending I ember 8L 1887, the Board of Directors of 

The Germau Bavlnga and Loan Society has declared a Dividend al the 
rate of four aud oue-half (I'.j) per cent, pel annum oo Term Deposits and 
three and three-fourth* [i \%) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposit and 
payable on aud after TUESDAY, the 31 day of January, 1888. 

Dec. 31. J By order. GEO. LETTS, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Northwest Corner Powell and Eddy streets. 
For the half year endiug December SI, 1887, a dividend has been dec 
at the rate of four aud one-half t4V£) per cent, per annum ou Term Deposits, 
and three and three-fourths (3%) per cent, per annum on Ordins 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after TUESDAY, January ;i, issft. 
Dec. 31.1 VEKNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



PERSON AND ANOTHER 

small New England village, where the soil is 



ONE 

Somewhere, in a 
rather more productive of heroes than of grain and fruit, I met Mr 
Silaa Kasson. The name of the village has long since faded from my 
memory, but the recollection of a tall, spare man, with a tangled crop 
of lank gray hair, hollow eyes of a costive glassiness, and a look-you- 
straight-m-the-faee earnestness that was fairly bewildering, is still 
verv distinct. In fact, Mr. Kasson was rather an odd cuss, having 
the same inscrutable, irresistible stare in the tones of his voice that 
he leveled at one with his eyes. He was immutable and immovable, 
holding the same even condition of temper right along. Perhaps it 
was this that insured for him the wisdom of a centenarian, and 
caused the good people of the village to fall back upon him in all 
cases uf extremity. Even beyond the preacher and the doctor was 
he held in esteem. One day a relative of his died in the village. The 
unfortunate deceased was deformed, and the knees stuck up so horri- 
bly that the body could not be squeezed into the coffin. Silas Kasson, 
who was addressing a prohibition meeting, was sent for when every 
means had failed. He came at once, and walked round the corpse, 
eyeing it as though he would call the spirit back to life again. After 
a while he leisurely drew a pruning knife from the depth of his ca- 
pacious trowser's pocket, and remarking, in a matter-uf-faet way, " 1 
guess I kin fix Ami," severed the cords under the knees, and straight- 
ened the limbs with a snap. Eyeing the startled friends in silence 
for a moment, he pocketed his knife, and went out and finished his 
address. * * This little village church I am showing you is a " reg'- 
lar meetin' " house of the good old New England days. It stands on 
an eminence, where the winds can have the best sweep against its 
paintless wooden sides. It is a dreary symbol of cold, hard truth 
standing alone, clothed only in its own stiadow. The winds under- 
stand it and dislike it, and they jostle it until it groans and shivers, 
and each year they are stealing away a little steeple or minaret, and 
wearing away its aching sides. Poor little church ! It is here that, 
for generations past, grave people have assembled and listened to a 
brace of comforters' sermons on the Sabbath, with gossip and dough- 
nuts at noon. And how they did gossip, too! and what a tight grip 
Mother Grundy bound themwith ! Among the congregation of this 
little church was an old white-haired settler, honored with the title of 
"Judge," who had nearly completed the hundredth year of his mor- 
tal pilgrimage. Though a little hard of hearing he was a regular at- 
tendant of church, and held the front seat, that he might profit by 
every word that fell from the tall pulpit above him. The preacher 
often indulged in the time-honored custom of the clergy and preached, 
with a voice elevated to a painfully high pitch. The old Judge was, 
of course, the last person in the world to call himself deaf, and highly 
resisted all extra efforts to make him hear. For a long time he had 
had a lurking suspicion that the pastor tacitly considered him deaf, 
and one day, when the reverend gentleman, by chance, fixed his eye 
upon him, and rained down a roaring torrent of words upon his 
white and hoary head, he could stand it no longer, and taking the 
key from the pastor, shouted back with all his might: " What makes 
you holler so for? There's no need of it! " 

There was a tall, angular person in the congregation, with red hair 
and dull green eyes, picked out near the pupil with a spot of yellow, 
who, at all seasons of the year, wore the same heavy plaid cloak and 
a pair of buckskin mittens on his freckled hands. One's ideas of 
stripes and washed-out colors were in some strange way always con- 
nected with him. Adorned as was his wont, this spectral column of 
awkwardly-jointed bones would appear in church on a Sabbath morn- 
ing. He usually came fashionably late, and despite the sound of 
grayer or psalm he would make the creaking of his great cow-hide 
oots heard above all, as he marched the length of the gallery to his 
customary seat, from which he could look down upon the preacher's 
bald head. The political excitement of the year 1840 had taken a 
strong hold upon him, and all morning, when the congregation was 
singing a hymn, he broke out into a " Harrison song" as loud as he 
could bellow. A horrified brother motioned to him, and leaned for- 
ward and whispered, "Stop." The singer paused, and turning 
haughtily upon the intruder, shouted in stentorian tones: " William 

Henry Augustus, you shet your d eternal head," and went on 

singing until the congregation had finished the hymn. Upon another 
occasion, immediately after the benediction, he rushed down stairs 
and elbowed his way up into the pulpit, where, spreading out his 
withered hands, with the wings of his plaid cloak lifted wide, he 
screamed out: " I am commanded of the Lord to preach the gospel 
to every critter ! " This was all he had to say, after which he came 
down and loped oil" home, while the congregation gathered at the 
door in silent astonishment, looking at his spotted back, which shone 
like a leopard's in the bright sunshine. 

There was a little round-bellied, round-shouldered bag of a fellow 
railed "Jo," who used to get his living (if it may be dignified with so 
grand a title) by doing " odd jobs," as he called his tours of scratch- 
ing in somebody's garden. He " never had no other name than jest 
Jo; leastways not as he could remember." He would not allow that 
his baptismal name was either .lohn, Jonas, Joel, Job or Josiah, nor 
indeed any name that I could think of that began with those two 
letters. Finally I fell upon it quite by accident. Jo was doing a little 
job for me, and, as was not seldom the case, was a little the worse for 
rum. The two words "Jo" and " rum " ran themselves together in 
my mind, and the result was "Jorum "—a kind of jar to put liquor 
into. The more I thought of it the more I was struck with the idea. 
Jo was certainly partial to having liquor poured into him. and this 
was not the only suggestion of a jar about him. I went over and in- 
quired if his unabbreviated name might not be Jorum. (One can 
never be certain nowadays that a man's name will not be something 
equally absurd). "Jo-/wc-rum," he remarked, thoughtfully, looking 
up at me with a wavering, unsteady glance, as he leaned upon his 
spade. " Yesh, that must be my full name, with^the acshent on the 
/iic-rum. Jo was mightily pleased at having found his old name 
again, for, as I walked away, I overheard him chuckling to himself: 
" Yesh, thash very good name; thash— hie— my name; thash kind 
name suits me." The true inwardness of this mortal's ways was not 
quite above suspicion. He had the seductive habit of coining round 
and offering to work at so ridiculously low a figure that one could not 



miss the opportunity. But no sooner would he get his task fairly 
under way than he would angrily throw down his tools, remarking 

"Ac ain't a goin' to work for d d Chinaman'swages,"and walk off". 

Of course you could not spare him at this juncture, so you were 
obliged to scream after him an increase of wages, and so entice him 
back to labor. He had just enough cunning to proportion his extra 
demands to your necessity for having the work done. Jo subsisted 
on crackers and red herrings, which he bought by the five cents' 
worth and ate on the spot. He had endless trouble with his fellow 
men and his Creator, and was particularly down on boys. He was 
always grumbling that " as soon as he got a job took the old fellar up 
there starts it in rainin', and he can't stop it nohow." 
Son Francisco, January 14, 1888. Walter E. Adams. 



" What Can be Done on Five Acres " is a heading in an agricul- 
tural exehange. We have known men to get gloriously drunk on a 
single acher, in trying to drink up sufficient courage to have it ex- 
tracted. On five a'chers we should think a man might do considerable. 



It is worth remarking that the canals never have flowing locks, neither 
do they buy their underwear at J. W. Carmanv's Emporium, No. 25 Kearny 
street, where oue cau find all the latest novelties. 



The most reliable optician of the Pacific Coast— C. Muller, 135 Mont- 
gomery street, near Bush. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,000,000 

DIRECTORS; 

Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, Issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Busine ss. [Aug. 6. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 18G9. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President. I ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. [Dec. 31. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS. PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest imp rove me uts for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, il 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 PINE ST.. San Francisco, Cal. [Nov. 19 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown Cashier | B. Murray, Jr . . . Assistant Cashier 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in London— Messrs. N. M, Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
ou New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Fraukfort-ou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy aud Switzerland. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE 1,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. PAIR. JAS. C. FLOOD, JNO. W. MACKAY, 

R. H. FOLLIS, JOHN BIGELOW. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

DEUTSCHE SPAR AKD LEIHBAKK. 
No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

OFFICERS— President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Fred 
Roeding, F. Tillman, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Ign. 
Steinhart, A. E. Hecht, O. Schoemann. Secretary, Geo. Lette. Attorneys, 
Jarboe & Harrison. May 14. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



THE MELLOW YEAR. 

The mallow year Is ha dose; 

Tl»- liiiU' birds hare almost rang their last, 
Their small Dotes twitter ill the dreary b 

That shrill-piped harbinger ol early snows; 

The paUenl beauty o( the x-entlesa rose, 

OH with tin- morn's hour crystal quaintly glassed, 
Bonn a pale mourner ol the summer past, 

Ami maJcea a little summer where it gr..w-; 

In the chill sunbeam »>f tin- faint brief day 

Tin- iiu>ky waters shudder as tla-y shim'; 

The nunel leaves obstruct the strugftung way 

«ty l'r.">k>, which ii" deep banks denne, 
And the gaunt woods, in ragged, scant array. 
Wrap their old limbs with stunher ivy-twim-. 
— Hart' 

THE CHURCH MILITANT. 

The Rev. Dr. Harmon, of the Centenary Methodist Episcopal 

Church, has made the preliminary announcement of a pugilistic 

event ol unusual interest. 1'r. Hannon rightly disapproves "t the 
ordinary prise-fighter of the Smith ami Kilratn type, sporting men 
who reu'ret the present degradation < >\ the ring will welcome the pros- 
peel ox the new contest, or rather tournament, which, if the asser- 
tions ol its advance agenl be nut overdrawn, will be one of the must 
exciting affairs in the history of the manly art. The y>rogrnnime is 
to open with a slogging match for blood between the Prince of Heaven 
and the Prince of Kvil. Dr. Qannon backs the former, and expresses 
his confident belief that his chan\pion will " give a black eye to the 
powers Ol darknes> and the enemy of mankind." After this ama- 
teurs will be afforded an opportunity t«> slug the battered heavy- 
weight of the lower regions; and to every one who succeeds in fur- 
ther discoloring the adversary's eye, " a rhampion belt, studded with 

the diamonds of righteousness, 'will be given by the Prince of 
Heaven." Clearly the Prince 18 even mure liberal of diamond belts 
than Richard K. Fox. Under 3uch circumstances, the public may 
Look forward to a series of matches that should serve to redeem the 
ring from the taint of hippodroming. 

Dr. Hannon'a combative tastes are not eonfined to pugilism. Fight- 
ing of every description is eoually congenial. The reverend critic is 
disturbed about the inabilitv of this city to resist an enemy. We 
learn that " there is a journal in Heavenwherein an accountis kept 
of the defenses of San Francisco." This journal, it seems, has lately 
had --everal blistering editorials about the condition to which Demo- 
economy has reduced our port. We need " forts of God, ships 
of Heaven, spiritual infantry, anil the heavy artillery of prayer." 
Uur deficiency in these respeets is another illustration of the negli- 
gence of even the most respectable politicians. Dr. Hannon states 
that " David was upon the Committee of Defenses." Now, David 
was alive nearly three thousand years ago, and if he occupied such a 
responsible place as that at that time, and has permitted San Fran- 
ciscoto go so long without forts of God and the heavy artillery of 
prayer, his carelessness has been nothing less than scandalous. It 
may be said that we have Dr. Hannon. True, but the Doctor him- 
self declares that we should have " no old smoothbores, but Gatlings 
and Krupps." 

QUEEN VICTORIA'S MESSAGE TO THE POPE. 
The folio-wing is the address of the Duke of Norfolk, the head of 
the Queen's Special Mission to the Pope, his Holiness' reply to which 
has been published: " Holy Father — Her Majesty, the Queen, my 
Most Gracious Sovereign, having been pleased to select me as Her 
Majesty's special Envoy to express to your Holiness, in a public and 
formal manner, her sense of the courtesy shown by the mission of 
Monsignor Ruffo Scilla to convey your Holiness' congratulations on 
the fiftieth anniversary of her reigri, I have the honor to present to 
your Holiness Her Majesty's letter accrediting me for that purpose. 
Her Majesty has commanded me to say that, in confiding to me this 
high mission, she has been moved not only by a desire to acknowledge 
this proof of your Holiness' good-will towards her, but also to give 
expression to her feeling of deep respect for the elevated character 
and Christian wisdom which you have displayed in your high posi- 
tion. The temperate sagacity with which your Holiness has corrected 
errors and assuaged differences from which much evil might other- 
wise have arisen, inspires Her Majesty with the earnest nope that life - 
and health may long be granted to you, and that your beneficent ac- 
tion may be long continued. In conclusion, I beg leave to be per- 
mitted to express to your Holiness how very sensible I am of the 
honor which nas been conferred upon me by my gracious Sovereign 
in selecting me for this high mission, and in making me the inter- 
preter of Her Majesty's sentiments on this occasion." 

PARALYZING SOME LOCAL INDUSTRIES. 
The cold snap has had a startling and paralyzing effect upon some 
of our local industries. The Kearny-street statue, the warm-weather 
ornament of the curb-stone, was conspicuous by his absence from his 
usual haunt, and the Market-street masher hunted his lair, hounded 
thither by the frigid clerk of the weather. The brazen-faced "chippy" 
was compelled to seek a refuge from the blistering blasts of Boreas, 
and the man with the rheumatic hand-organ decamped as if a gen- 
uine blizzard had suddenly smitten him. The accordion woman 
failed to put in an appearance, much to the delight of ears tortured 
by her non-classical wails, and the pencil-vendor hied himself off 
without ceremony. There was a lamentable absence of the hook- 
nosed hyenas who congregate about the cigar-stores, to leer and jeer 
at every woman who passes by, as there was of the street vags, whose 
supreme joy in life is to strike generous-hearted citizens for "ten 
cents to buy a cup of coffee." and then lavishly expend it at the 
shrine of King Gambrinus or King Alcohol. While it is to be re- 
gretted that some of our local industries were thus paralyzed by the 
cold wave, it is consoling to know that the disastrous effect is but 
temporary in its character. 



THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

8S2 PINK STHEET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000.000. 

0IRECT0R8 1 

wm. n'r^KKK 

. t SBJ 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Capital $2,100,000 

Sin Francisco Office, 424 California SI. | London Office . 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Mauagcr, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Aeslslaul Manager, William 8t*«l. 

LONDON BANKERS— Sank ol England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW yORK— Drexel, Morgan 4 Co BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This lirtiik is prepared to transact nil kin-Is of Qeneral Banking nud Ex- 
change Business in London and San Prnuclsco, and between said cities and 
all pHrts of the world, June y. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

20B Sansome Street 

Subscribed Capital S 2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve fund, $150,000. 

Heap Office 9 and 10, Tokcnhonse Yard, Lothbury, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the Loudon, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), 415 Exchange Place. PARIS— Messrs. Lnzard Ereres A Cie, 17 Boulevard 
Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal citlesof the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits Issued. DAVID CAHN. I„ 

EUGENE MEYER,! Maua & cr8 - 
C. Altschdl, Cashier. [March 26. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT-'. W. Seligman 4 Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, »6,000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW. I ,, 

ION. STEINHART,) Managers. 
P. N. Liliem thai,, Cashier. [March 26. 

BANK OF BR ITI SfT^OLUM BIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $1,875,000 

RESERVE FUND 450,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets, 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, Now Westminster, Vancouver, Nanalmo and 

Kamloops, British Columbia. 

This Bauk transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North aud South Wales Bank: SCOTLAND— British Liueu Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bauk 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND-Bank o 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Companyof Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
aud TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. [March 28. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid-up Capital— $1,500,000, Gold 
President . DANIEL CALLAGHAN | Vice-President ..JAMES MOFFITT 
Cashier, E. D. Morgan; Assistant-Cashier, Geo. W. Kline. 
DIRECTORS: 

D. CALLAGHAN, | JAMES D. PHELAN, I JAMES H. JENNINGS, 

C. G. HOOKER, JAMES MOFFITT, GEORGE A. LOW, 

JAMES M. DONAHUE, I N. VAN BERGEN, | GEO. L. DUVAL. 

Correspondents: LONDON— Bank of Montreal, Lombard street. DUB- 
LIN— Provincial Bank of Irelnml HAMBURG— Hesse, Neuman A Co. 
PARIS— Hottiuguer & Co. NEW YORK— National Bank of Commerce. 
BOSTON— Blackstone Natioual Bank. CHICAGO— First National Bank. 

This Bauk is prepared to transact a general banking bnsiuess. Deposits 
received. Exchange for sale on the principal cities of the United States, 
Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial credits issued, 
available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and prompt 
returns made, at the lowest marke t rat e of exchange. June 28. 

NEW ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION (LIMITED). 

CAPITAL £2.000.000 | Subscribed and Paid Up ., .£600,000 

HEAD OFF/CE-40 THREADNEEDLE STREET, LONDON. 

Bankers— Union Bauk of Loudon (Limited) and Bank of Scotland. 

Edinburgh Agency— 23 St. Andrew Square. 

Branches— Bombay, Calcutta, Colombo, Madras. Muritius, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Singapore, Yokohama, in Australia at Melbourne aud Sydney. 

The Bauk Buys and Sells Bills of Exchange, makes Telegraphic Transfers, 
issues Letters of Credit ami Circular Notes available throughout the world, 
forwards Bills for Collection, undertakes the Purchase and Sale of Secu- 
rities, holds them for safe custody, and realizes interests aud dividends, 
Collects Pay and Pensions, Pays In>urance Premiums aud Club Subscrip- 
tions, and Transacts Banking and Agency Business generally. 

Fixed Deposits received for upwards of 12 months at 5 per cent, and at 
correspondingly favorable rates for shorter periods. 

The fullest information cau be obtained by application at any of the 
brauches aud agencies, or at the head office. 

Sept. 24.J GEORGE WILLIAM THOMSON, Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 



* We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's.' 



-Tom Moore. 



In " Around the World in Eighty Days," Kiralfy introduces two 
ballets that may be counted among the few good things for which we 
are indebted to him. The dramatic representation of the play is weak 
as a whole. As Phineas Fogg, Newton Gotthold is phlegmatic and 
impassive, consequently truly characteristic. In the minor part of 
the barkeeper, another actor of the same name, C. F. Gotthold, does 
a bit of very meritorious realistic character acting. The acting of the 
others in the cast calls for no mention. The spectacular effects are, 
as usual with Kiralfy, ridiculous failures. The Union Pacific train 
in the play is an inexhaustible fund of amusement. In its brief pas- 
sage across the stage it indulges in a series of the wildest antics. The 
cars run off the track, shoot up in the air, rear up on their hind 
trucks, telescope into each other, and to cap the climax, the tender, 
with a sudden inspiration of motive power, pulls the car, leaving the 
locomotive standing. As no one now experts anything else in a 
Kiralfy show, all these scenic fiascos do not call for serious condem- 
nation. 

***** 

The two ballets are well arranged and well danced. The costumes 
are all new and picturesque, tbe coryphees seem to have had some 
few ideas of time and rhythm pounded into them, and the premieres 
exhibit their grace of motion and pedal dexterity to their utmost. 
The fife and drum step is admirably danced, in perfect unison. The 
automaton dance is a bit of saltatorial burlesque, very cleverly exe- 
cuted by four secundas. It includes a suggestion of the can-can, to 
the manner born. The palm in this dance must be awarded to Mile. 
Con rath. 

****** 

The performance of An American King on Monday night, at the 
Baldwin Theatre, was unworthy of the company and o f the theatre. 
Almost every one was at sea in his lines. The dialogue was a suc- 
cession of lapses of memory, hesitating breaks, waits, mispronounced 
words and perverted sentiments. The greatest offender was an actor 
by the name of Lawrence Manning. In most countries he would 
have been roundly hissed; but we are a patient people, and conse- 
quently are imposed upon. The star himself was at sword's point 
with his text. It was altogether a very aggravating performance. Of 
the play itself, little can be said m praise. It is absurd and exagger- 
ated in plot and sentiment. The author is evidently very familiar 
with the conventional side of theatrical effect and has a good memory 
for popular theatrical hits; but he has no ingenuity of construction, 
no ability in character drawing, and no knowledge of things in 
general in the phases of life he has sought to depict. As a melo- 
drama this play has many exciting qualities, and with a certain class 
of theatre-goers is, no doubt, accepted as satisfactory. Further com- 
ment is not called for. 

***** 

There is one thing to be said about the Alcazar company— it always 
plays with vim and spirit. The performance of Ranch Ten is an evi- 
dence of this. It is a wild frontier melodrama, and as such most 
forcibly acted. In fact, it is most energetically "whooped up! " Bar- 
rows attempts — very successfully, too — a melodramatically heroic 
part. Mordaunt revels in a strong character role. This actor's versa- 
tility is remarkable. A few more artists like him are needed on the 
stage. Harry Davenport makes of Kebrook a most picturesque vil- 
lain. Stockwell exhibits his clever low comedy in the part of the 
Judge, tempering it with a degree of clever caricature. The court 
scene which ends the play is something all theatre-goers should see. 
It is one of the most amusing bits of broad burlesque seen in many 
a day. The spirit ofjthe thing seems to pervade every one on the 
stage. 

***** 

There is a line in one of the scenes of Ranch 10 which nightly raises 
a laugh. The cause of the hilarity is not apparent, and reflection 
does not furnish any explanation. The third act ends with the mar- 
riage ceremony performed in " the heart of the Rockies " by a frontier 
E arson. As he joins the hands of the heroine and the dying hero, 
e speaks the sacramental phrase, " Whom God hath joined together 
let no man put assunder," and the audience roars in answer. Why? 
Is it taken to be a " gag ? " or is it considered funny in the light of 
lax marriage laws and the prevalence of divorce? In the first case 
it would be a. strange commentary upon the intelligence of the Alca- 
zar audience. In the second it "would be a severe reflection on the 
good taste of those present. Considered *bne way or the other, the 
burst of laughter is disgraceful. 

***** 

At the Bush-street theatre the variety company is continuing its 
successful season. Hertz has introduced some new tricks, which 
are as mystifying and as neatly executed as those of his first week. 
In some respects the illusion entitled " Mystix " is as inexplicable as 
the "Cocoon." 

***** 

A Trip to the Moon is still the Tivoli attraction. At the Orpheum 

Marshall's troupe of Japanese Jugglers are appearing. For next 
week several novelties are promised. At the Baldwin, Carleton's 
Opera Comique Company will preface a production of Cellier's Doro- 
thy, with a week of old favorites. At the Bush-street Theatre, a 

romantic play, Rent, will be the solid dish offered tbe patrons of this 
popular place of amusement after the frivolities of the Variety 

Troupe. At the Alcazar Uncle loin's Cabin will be resurrected. 1 

may mention that this is not a novelty. 

***** 

Some day or other there will come to us in a halo of European 
fame, three musical artists— girls by the name of .Toran— and the pub- 
lic will acclaim them. It will be a surprise to most people to learn 
that they are Californian girls, and that thev had appeared and per- 
formed many a time in concert before. It is unfortunate that the 
above statement is a fact. These clever girls gave a concert last week, 
and a score or so of people were all that were present. And yet 
among the many young musicians that claim California as their 



birthplace, there are none who deserve more renown than Pauline 
Joran, and in a minor way her sisters. It will suffice for the present 
to make this declaration. 

***** 
Among the few theatrical celebrities who are personally unknown 
to the San Francisco public are Henry Irving and Coquelin. The 
latter is under engagement to give a'series of performances here 
during his coming tour in America. The former, who is now as well 
known in New York as he is in London, has not yet signified his in- 
tention to pay San Francisco a professional visit. These two men 
may be said to represent two extremes— true art and charlatanry. 
As neither of them are at present acting here, the development of 
the opinions, with their governing influences, and the analytical rea- 
sons upon which the foregoing statement rests, would not be timely. 
At the same time, a comparison of the two actors, resulting from a 
recent opportunity of witnessing their respective interpretations of 
the same character, may be interesting reading. The role of Mathis 
in The Bells, the English adaptation of Erckmann-Chatrian's Jnlf 
Polonais, is one in which, rightfully or wrongfully, Irving has achieved 
great renown. While acting in London, a few years ago, Coquelin 
appeared as JVlatbi* in the original play. It was considered the least 
successful of his impersonations. This opinion was based entirely 
upon a comparison with Irving, his interpretations being accepted as 
the standard by which the other was judged. To me tbe very same 
comparison proved the contrary. I may say that it justified the use 
of the two terms— true art and charlatanry. Coquelin gives to his per- 
sonage the character, the physiognomy," the manners, indicated by 
the authors, who made of the Alsatian Burgomaster a man who. 
guilty of a horrible crime, has been skillful enough to conceal it and 
remain undetected, and, having given cause for suspicion, lives and 
dies honored, esteemed and venerated by his people. Coquelin's 
Mathis is such a man portrayed to the life. He has the good, virtu- 
ous look which deceives the world and kills distrust, and one can well 
understand the respect that is shown to him by all. It is only by the 
wonderful play of features indulged in by Coquelin, wonderful in its 
expressiveness, but which demands, of course, close and sustained 
attention on the part of the audience, that it can read the truth in 
Mathias's soul, a truth of which the other personages in the play aie 
ignorant. This is exactly as it should be. The audience under- 
stands everything; the actors do not, and that is the exceptional 
merit of Coquelin's interpretation, for it is the essence of true acting. 
Irving represents a Mathis, visibly, emphatically haunted by the sou- 
venir of his crime. He gives to the Burgomaster a profoundly emotion- 
al physiognomy, but accentuates it so strongly that one wonders that 
the others in tne play have not long suspected the truth, and that the 
gendarme instead of asking him for the hand of the daughter is not 
engaged in putting handcuffs on the father. The first interpreta- 
tion is an artistic one, which appeals to educated, thinking people. 
It is a consistent characterization, in which the actor reproduces, 
mentally and physically a given personage. The second interpreta- 
tion appeals to the mass, who applaud a vehement exclamation, a 
marked ejaculation, a violent gesture, and all other such extravagant 
bits of detail. It is a bit of stage-trickery, emphasized by air the 
ingenuity of a clever stage manager. These two interpretations illus- 
trate the extremes of acting — the good and the bad. As Mathis, 
Coquelin is Mathis. As Mathias, Irving is Irving. Coquelin shows 
us a natural being, a possible individual. Irving creates a fantastical 
creature, a semi-supernatural thing without any bonds to anything 
in human nature. Beaeclerc. 

BALDWIN THEATRE — O'Neill. 

(THE LEADING THEATRE.) 

Al. Hayman .. .Lessee and Manager 

This Evening and Saturday Matinee. Last week of MR. JAMES O'NEILL. 
Great success of Chas. T. Dazey's Realistic Drama, entitled 

^35T AMEBICAH - ZECHTSTGI- I 
With a Powerful Cast and Appropriate Scenery. 

NEXT MONDAY-fABLETON OPERA COHPAXT. 
REPERTOIRE FOR FIRST WEEK. 

Monday, January 16th— THE MERRY WAR— Phenomenal Cast, Amazon 
March, etc. Tuesday— NANON. Wednesday— ERMINIE. Thursday— MER- 
RY WAR. Fridav (last time)— NANON. Saturday Matinee (last time)— 
MERRY WAR. Saturday Night (last time)— ERMINIE. 

Seat now on Sale. Regular Prices. [Jan. 14. 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 



Al. Hayman Lessee I Lewis Morrison Manager 

This and Every Evemus and Saturday Matinee, for Two Weeks Only, 
Grand Revival of KIRALFY BROS.' Greatest Spectacle, 
J^ttOUJSTJD TIHIIE AATOIRXiID IIDsT 80 IDJ^ITS. 
Dramatic cast of rare excellence; New Ballets; New Scenery; Startling 
Effects. First time on any stage of Bolossy Kiralfy's National and Military 
Ballet, AMERICA, by an augmented corps de ballet. First presentation of 
the Eccentric Automaton Dauce, represented by Adonis Dixey, Hamlet 
Irving, Theodora Bernhardt, Hester Grazebrook Langtry. and the finale from 
the beautiful Ballet of Laces. Three Brilliant Premier Danseuses, Bella, 
Paris, Nicode, and the Live Trick Elephant PARNELL. 250 People in this 
Grand Production. 
Monday, January 23d— A Positive Novelty, 

.A. ZD^RZKI SECEET! fJan. 14. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 



.Manager 



M. B. Leavitt Proprietor | Chas. P. Hall 

Matinee To-day at 2 p. M. Last Week. BOSTON HOWARD ATHENJEUM 
SPECIALTY COMPANY. Hertz's New Illusion, 

MYSTYX. 
Last week of the great 

COCO IsTI 
$1,000 to any one who cau give a correct explanation of how the trick is 
done. This Company does not play in Oakland this season. 

Next Week— Monday, January 16th, MR. WM. REDM0ND and MRS 
THOS. BARRY', in 

B E K" B . " tJ«"- "• 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO MEWS LETTER 



9 



SPORTING. 



There will be no imm- gory Bshta at the Olympic Club's r ns. 

As soon ta U waa announced that the directors had another mill In 
contemplation, protest after protest whs evoked from the members, 
effectually dolnjr away with the plan. The small but loud lighting 
element in the club \> wrath, and the pel Idea ol Riving monthly 
pugilistic exhibitions is likely to be revived at anytime. However, 
the reputable element Is largely in the majority, and will not hesitate 
to put a quietus to aoch a scheme. 1 think that as a whole the club 
is to be congratulated on having the good sense to bar Buch exhibi- 
tions as arc given by the minor and that there 
Is certainly sufficient interest in general athletics For at least one club 
to boycott professional pugs. The Olympics have a tine programme 
of ooming events. Among the principal attractions are a Lathes' 
Night exhibition on the 20tB inst. ; a boxing tournament, fOT members 
of the club, on January 27th; the middle weight wrestling tourna- 
ment on February 16th; juvenile night on February 24th; catch-as- 
catcb-can wrestling tournament on March 28rd; and a boxing tour- 
nament, open to all amateurs, on April 6th. If these attractions are 
not an inducement to the club men they will never be satisfied with 
anything except brutal fighting. 

* * » » # 

The Californias are awaiting Jack Dempsey's arrival with no small 
degree oi" impatience. The expected appearance of the " Nonpareil " 
has served to establish a fistic boom at the Grant avenue headquar- 
ter-, ami it Dempsey eventually decides not to assume the instructor- 
ship, something will drop. The Californias live because they foster 
boxing and fighting. Men belong to the Club for the sole purpose of 
witnessing the set-to's and scraps given from time to time. Some 
joined to learn the science of the ring. It will require a good man to 
fill the place set aside for Dempsey, and such a one is not easily 
found. There are dozens and scores of men about town who would 
he only too glad to get the chance, the recent importations from the 
East and Australia being the most clamorous. While boxing is in 
high favor, the boxers are too numerous, and some of them must 
turn to other pursuits or leave. The Californias have put up a purse 
for Patsy Carroll and Dan Laflin to fight for on the 27th instant, and 
they want Sam Fitzpatrick and Billy Mehan to meet at the same 
time. 

Jimmy Faulkner, the catch-as-catch-ean wrestler, will soon have a 
match on his hands. Peter Schumacher challenged him to a Graeco- 
Roman contest, but the elusive Faulkner put in a reply calling for a 
mixed contest, one fall Grseco-Roman. one fall catch-as-cateh-can, 
and the deciding fall to be determined by the lime of the others. 
Faulkner has few equals at his particular style, and would manage 
to make short work of Schumacher. 

***** 

Early next month, representative wheelmen from every State and 
Territory west of the Rockies will meet to form a Pacific Coast 
League.' They should have encouragement from every wheelman. 
There is ample work for such an organization without any intrusion 
on the operations of any club or league now in existence. They 
could take up the subject of road-racing, and assume the manage- 
ment and form the rules for such affairs. Other matches could be 
arranged, and it might be a good plan to make provision for the pro- 
fessionals, which all amateur associations strictly refuse to do. 
***** 

Henry Peterson is an excellent sculler. He has plenty of strength, 
skill and steam, but he is apt to lose his head in a close pinch. O'Con- 
nor, the Toronto oarsman, who is to pull against him, is described as 
one of the coolest of the cool. Edward Hanlan, whose opinions on 
rowing matters cannot be questioned, rates him as one of the best 
rising men in the country, and this being the case, the Californian 
will have to row as he never rowed before to win the great match of 
March 18th. O'Connor has defeated such men as Hamm, Lee Has- 
iner and Ten Eyck, placing him in the front ranks of the second- 
class men. There will be a grand race, and while Peterson is nat- 
urally the favorite, O'Connor is rated by the knowing ones as the 
winner. 

***** 

From J. B. Haggin's ranch the most favorable reports come, indi- 
cating that the Haggin string of runners will be in better order than 
ever the coming year. The youngsters are in particularly good con- 
dition, and jockeys and trainers are working harder than usual dur- 
ing the Winter season. Haggin's new jockey, Van Court, is showing 
up well. Since leaving the city he has been initiated into the many 
mysteries of the craft, and has already adopted a style of riding much 
like that of Fred Archer. Van Court is light, and he has the best 
wishes of every one in the city with whom he is acquainted. He will 
ride his first race during the Spring meeting of the Blood-horse Asso- 
ciation. Baldwin will also have a number of good ones on the East- 
ern turf in the Spring, to carry the name and the prestige of the 
Maltese cross. Los Angeles and the Empress of Norfolk are regard- 
ed as the most promising of the lot. Baldwin's stable will not be as 
large as last year, and only the very best horses on the ranch will be 
allowed to leave it. Porter Ashe's horses, while sick, are not as badly 
off as represented, and he may get a good pile of money out of them 
before the leaves turn again. Senator Hearst and Senator Stanford 
have some good ones; and lastly, the irrepressible white-hatted Dan 
McCarthy will bob up with as many plugs as ever. Dan's prize horse 
last year was C. H. Todd, and he expects great things from the same 
brute during the coming Summer. 

***** 

The fighters are engrossing the attention of the sporting classes 
East of the Rockies. The Sullivan-Mitchell match, which it is safe 
to say will never take place, is drawing forth much comment. Mitch- 
ell, like Kilrain and Smith, is too sharp to let the champion get a 
chance at him, and meanwhile all four are getting an immense 
amount of free advertising. Kilrain and Smith are soon to travel 
through this country, hippodroming for dollars. 



At a recent meeting ol the California Kennel nub, it whs decided 
not i.. hold a bencb show thin year, aatbi ub is already 

such an attraction. The California i 
however, will give a series ol fiehl trials in December or in January, 
IB89. The Committee to make the arrangements is composed of toe 
Following gentlemen: .1. M. Crane, J. \V. Lygreen, .1. B. Martin, A. 
B.Truman, .1. ttrausgill, John Kerrigan, Joseph Kin:-. I;. K. Gard- 
ner, J. \\\ Orndorff, W. tl. ITHara, Fi eld, G. \ . < 
B, Lewis, Thomas Higga, J. DeVaull and \\\ <:. Cue. 

• • « • • 

The foot-ballistfi will l ut in full foroe this afternoon at the Four- 
teenth and Center-street, grounds, Oakland. A match game will be 
played under the intercollegiate rules, and all are welcome. The 

loot-hall .season has opened auspicioUflly, and there is every indica- 
tion that the contests this vear will In- better and closer than* ever. 

» * * * * 

It is conceded that the game played at the Haight street gronndfl 
last Sunday between the New York i Hants and the St Louis Browns 
was onS o| the Hnest exhibitions of baseball playing ever seen on this 
coast, and could with difficulty be excelled elsewhere. The fielding 
was sharp and accurate, every player of both teams, excepting Wood", 
having a chance to make a play during the game. The Giants made 
but one hit oil' King's pitching, ami that was a scratch one by Ward, 

and which he Won through licet base running. It was intended to 

play Fogarty in the New York team, but having been seriously in- 
jured through being hit in the eye by a pitched ball, Wood, of the 

Phillies, was played in his place. Wood, of the Phillies, is one of 

the best outfielders and surest hatters in the business. Notwith- 
standing the cold weather over eight thousand people attended the 

game last .Sunday between the Browns and Giants. The Pioneers 

and St, Louis Browns will play at the Haight street grounds this af- 
ternoon. Williamson, of the Chicagos, will play with the former 

club. Some are under the erronious impression" that the National 

League adopted the scoring rules recommended by the reporters a 

few months ago. It is not definitely settled under what scoring or 

playing rules the game will be conducted next season. When La- 
tham commences to coach it would take several stenographers to 

keep up with him. Tiernan says he will not enter the pitcher's 

box hereafter if he can avoid doing so. Ewing does not like to go 

behind the bat. Foutz and Latham will be the battery for the 

Browns Saturday afternoon. It is not generally known, but it is a 

fact that Latham is a first-class catcher. Pffefer and Forster, who 

have been playing at Central Park, returned East Thursday. It is 

safe to say that Pffefer will sign with Chicago for next season. 
Richardson played a splendid second base for the New Yorks last 

Sunday. Brown did not support Van Haltren as well last Sunday 

as was expected. Kecfe was disappointed because he was not per- 
mitted to pitch last Sunday against the Browns. Captain Ward 
thought that as Van Haltren was a left-hand pitcher he would be 
more effective against the St. Louis club. The Giants lost through 

their inability to bat King. Nothing has been heard of Kelly since, 

like the Arab, he folded his tent and silently stole away. The 

Eastern papers criticise Kelly's hasty departure from here very severe- 
ly. As Morrill and he are rivals" for the Captaincy of the Boston 
chili, and the papers having taken sides, his unexplained movement 

may help the former. The crowd who visited the Haight street 

grounds last Sunday proved that baseball is still in a very healthy 
condition. The utmost capacity of the grounds will be tested to-mor- 
row if the weather is only half endurable.— Notwithstanding the 
immense attendance at the Haight street grounds last Sunday, the 
management realized nothing. The entire receipts went for expenses 

and to the Browns and Giants. Some of the Eastern press confuse 

the California League and California State League together. This is 
a mistake. The former has been in existence for many years, while 
the latter is not a month old, and is composed almost entirely of 
players who recently played in the California Amateur League. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenrod, Osbourne & Stockwell, Managers— Geo. Wallenrod, Lessee 
This Evening at 8, and during entire week, with Saturday Matiuee, Alex- 
ander's Thrilling Drama, 

zEa^zrsrciEa: 101 

Novel Effects ! New Scenery ! 
Characters by OSBOURNE and STOCKWELL and their Famous Company 
of Comedians. 
g&- Popular Prices— 25c, 50c and 75c. 

Next— Spectacular Revival of 
TTIETQIILIE TQ^'S CA^BUST. [Jan. U. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Sole Proprietors and Managers 

Third Week. Unabated Success! Enthusiastic Audiences! This even- 
ing, and until further notice, Offenbach's Gorgeous Operatic Spectacle, 

_A. T^aXX 3 TO TIHIIE uvcooirs] - 1 

23 Artistic Stage Pictures, ending with a Dazzling Transformation Scene. 
Wonderful Mechanical Effects. Beautiful and Rich Costumes. Magnificent 
Appointments 1 Electric Illuminations! 150 Principal Artists. Grand 
Chorus, Orchestra and Auxiliaries. The Auditorium and Stage illuminated 
by Edison's Incandescent Light, under the supervision of the Electric De- 
velopment Co., 323 Piae Street. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25 and 50 Cents. [Jan. 14. 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE RASEBALL GROUNDS, 

End of Haight-street Cable Road. 

SATURDAY, Jan. 14th, at 2:30 o'clock p. M ST. LOUIS BROWNS vs. 

PIONEERS. 

SUNDAY, Jan. 15th, 11 o'clock A. M GOLDEN RULE vs. BAY CITY 

At 2 o'clock P. M NEW YORK GIANTS vs. ST. LOUIS BROWNS. 

Admission, 25 and 10 cents. Ladies free on Saturday. Reserved seats on 
Sundays, 25 cents extra. „ . - , , . , «,™ -,, 

Seats can be secured at Gunst's Cigar Store, junction Market and O'Farrell 
streets, until 10 o'clock on day of game. [Jan. 14. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



MAG AT THE ARMY GERMAN. 
Dear N. L.: When I said 't I'd tell you all about the Array ger- 
man, I didn't have no notion 't I'd have such lota to tell, 'cause it 
w; b no end scrumptious, you bet. Some o' the girls 'ts what are 
called Presidio pets had been bavin' drilliu' parties among 'em, 'n 
makin' it the occasion, at the same time, o' reg'lar larks. But to 
begin. When we entered the ballroom (how's that for style?) every 
one was exclaimin' about how real sweet the decorations was— flags 
'n streamers 'n shields 'n Army lixin's generally. Right in the mid- 
dle o' the stage was the cutest "tent 't ever you saw, 'n o' course the 
girls jumped at the idea 't it was " flirtation corner." The stars 'n 
stripes was to be seen everywhere, 'n from the chandelier in the mid- 
dle o' the hall a lovely flag was draped most beautifully. 1 just tell 
you 't if there was any old-time " rebs" among the crowd, they must 
o' felt a return o' patriotism under the old starrv banner. Anybody 'd 
a got enthused. Ned whispered to me, "Here's the big gun of the 
affair," 'n o' course I gazed in every direction, expectin' to see a 
large-sized cannon, 'n would you believe 't Ned meant Bean ! You 
oughter a seen him (Bean). Warn't he just swelled out with import- 
ance! 

Well, after the floor managers had got all the old dowagers stowed 
away upstairs, 'n tcllin' 'em they'd have a better view 'n so forth, the 
music struck up for the cotillion, 'n the folks took their places. Just 
here let me, as the Judge would say, digress a little, 'n say 
what lotso' us dancers was sayin' that evenin', what on top 6 1 
this earth old married wimmen 't ain't got no girls to fetch 
along want goin' to cotillions 'n filllin' up the space is more 
than any of us could make out. If you could a seen the 
dumpy garrulous wite o' the ex-stage driver, you'd know what I 
mean. Slollie says at her tongue cuts sharper 'n a sword, 'n that 
brings me back to the german again, for one o' the Aggers was drawn 
sabers, which the fellahs held in a kind o' arch for their partners to 
go under. I thought I'd most die laughin' at a awful timid girl('t 
stood right near me) gettin' scared when the men stooped 'n picked 
up the sabers 't was lyin 1 on the floor. I guess 't she thought they 
was a goin' to make a cavalry charge 'n go for us. The black coats 
was rsal envious, though they pretended 't they warn't, but every 
now 'n then you'd hear 'em make a little speech 't sounded real hate- 
ful, like sayin' 't the Army warn't 's gallant as the civilians, 'cause 
they put the ladies in the rear! However, they needn't a been miff- 
ed at the brass buttons' success, 'cause black' coated chaps is fre- 
quently more profitable as partners for life 'n army 'n navy chaps, 
'n as Ned says the girls o' the period recognize that fact "fully, 'n 
don't throw 'era over for gold lace, like our grandma's in Washin'ton 
used to do. 

The rigger 't was called " skirmishin' " was real effective, 'n made 
the lookers on clap their hands in applause, 'n as might be expected 
them 't had been practicin' it did it better 'n the others. But 1 guess 
every one was satisfied, 'n the P. B.'s was radiant (Presidio Pets, I 
mean. Ned calls 'em Post Proteges). 

The upper crust o' society always comes out strong for the Bach'- 
lors' parties, 'u on the occasion was in full force. It was real anuis- 
in' to hear a certain set wailin' : n laraentin* over the departed East- 
ern Friskie (1 reckon, if the truth was told, 'I that same dame looks 
upon her 'Frisco sojourn 's a time o' penance). Ned said to some o' 
the disconsolate chappies 't praps they'd have a brilliant future in 
Friskies ahead, for if the Eastern ones in search o' divorce should 
look upon this " Queen City o' the Pacific Coast" (Mag may 's well 
blow a little) 's a good stampin' ground, what a charming set o' crea- 
tures would exile 'emselves here for a season, 'n play havoc with the 
tender susceptibilities of the Old Boys' Club 'n the Goslin' Brigade. 
So, in the language o' the poet, we say to New York 'n Bawston, 
" Fetch on your Friskies 'n we'll grind 'em out in our divorce mill 's 
good 's new." 

To return to our muttons. The array german was el'gant, 'n all 
the girls was spliffy. The three engaged couples was the observed o' 
all observers. Every one was a shakin' hands with Lulu till her arm 
must a been sore. It was fun seein' little Matt tryin' to be demure. 
Her cousin was 's sweet as she always looks, so real ladylike. The 
D. M. G.'s was all present. (Ned asked me if the horrors' was meant 
by them initials, but 's 1 told him, I thought 't every fool knew 't 
they meant the Del Monte gang). You just should a seen Emily 
puttin' on airs 'n ravin' about the men o' the East. She declared 't 
Will Ralston was the express image of a New York dude. Apropos 
o' him they say 't although it's a young girl 'ts captured his — what 
the old Judge calls— somewhat fickle fancy^it's a gray son. Now, I'd 
just like to know how a person can be a son 'n a girl at the same 
tirae. Ned says it's the color prefix 't does it. Lame! I wonder if 
the " brother ofn'cer" o' the brother-in-law '11 bite at the bait 'n the 
lanky damsel attached. Well, 's I've frequently remarked, " all 'ts 
bright must fade," 'n so the evenin' come to an end, but we girls 
have done notbin' but talk about it ever since. Havin' exhausted the 
german o' the past, every one 's chuck full o' the one o' the future 
(no portly Dutch Barons alluded to). My sakes, ain't that a goin' to 
be a gorgeous ball, though I No wonder 't the folks is tryin' their 
level best to get asked to go. Talk about favors ! Nellie told us girls 
not to choose our new Spring costumes till we'd danced for them bats. 
It appears 't they ain't no slouch affairs got at wholesale, but reg'lar 
fashionable imported ones from a swell miU'ner's. Then, sashes a 
yard wide, hand painted, 'n elegant fans. Ed. declares 't it's worth 
while bein' in that cotillion, for 't '11 give a fellah a chance to manacle 
the hand of a heiress, 'n after he's snapped the padlock keep the key. 
But the old Judge growled out " how it you get hold of a girl that is not 
an heiress? Do you want to put fetters on her?" However, 's ma 
remarked, " it's a lottery, 'n you must take your chances," so if the 
key's turned 'n kept by the ri^ht chap it may lead to matrimonial 
bands. Who knows! All suits o' rumors is nyin' about as to the 
scrumptious dresses 't are goin' to be worn, 'n "if the characters are 
as folks say 't '11 be a most original affair. I've heard o' three 'ts go- 
in* as different metals— brass, tin 'n lead (the Judge bad to chip in 
when I first spoke of 'em, 'n say, " millionaire's son— army officer— 
society man.") Ned suggested 't a officeholder should go as cold 
ste(a)el to finish the group! Did y'ever? I tell you 't there's lots o' 
joy ahead for us fashionable folks till Lent comes in. 



Nettie's weddin' 's goin' to be the grandest 't ever was seen here. 
So report says— but I reckon the one 't 'II astonish the natives in 
dead earnest '11 be one 't 's to come off between a widower 'n his old 
love. Now guess, everybody! 'taint so hard, if you'll think a little, 
both is dark *n near of a age, 'n are what's called well-fixed— p'raps 
I'll give the names right out next time. It 's right funny the way 't 
half the world wants to get into the married state, 'n the other half 
wants to get out! By-the-bye, did you hear 't the Lick House bell- 
boy said 't there was* more reporters in this city 'n anything else? 
Come to find out, he'd been passin' cards for every Kearny street 
statue 'n Market street masher who handed in reporters' pasteboards, 
borrowed for the purpose o' gettin' a sight o' the would-be temperance 
oblitevator (the old boy's appellation for her) as she " reclined in an 
interesting manner on"her pillow " — vide the Monarch o' the Dailies. 
He's got it bad, ain't he, that king-pin? I reckon that's the sort of a 
hair-pin the Monarch is. Men-folks is awful fond o' sneerin' at wim- 
men for goin' to prisons after criminals, 'n so forth, but la me, just 
let a woman be 's bad 's anything, shoot a man or poison her children, 
'n see if the men don't make big-sized jacks o' theraeslves in sym- 
pathy for her. Did you hear that tidy little piece o* gossip 't 's been 
fillin'' the air o' the upper crust o' late? It appears'tacouple o'ladiea 
't 's killin' thick are pretty " fly," 'n it so happens 't the husband o' 
No. 1 is carryin' on like fits with No. 2, 'n people do say 't she's just 
waitin' for a'good chance to get the dead thing on her "dear friend " 
to give her away 'n a divorce case set the man free to marry her! 
(Ain't this world awful !) Well, one Sunday lately, 's she was goin 1 
to a down-town fashionable church, who should she see comin' out o' 
a big lodgin' house on Kearny street, but the wife. Over she rushed 
'n boldly charged the wife with goodness what— (it must be real bad, 

'cause Mrs. , who told ma, kept holdin' up her hands 'n rollin' up 

her eyes like a duck in thunder). The wife insisted 't she'd been to a 
doctor to get vaccinated, but when she was asked to show her arm, 
said the doctor had failed to connect, warn't in his office, 'n so forth, 
'n now there's war in that outfit— some believe the wife, others pity 
the husband, but o' course, you'll hear how it all goes if it gets into 
court, as 'tis whispered it will. Well, s'long. Mag. 



"We have been examining a book of "Familiar Quotations " and 
after deep thought unhestitatingly pronounce it a fraud. From 
cover to cover we have perused it microscopically, so to speak, and 
have failed to discover the familiar quotation in the language, viz. : 
"Oh ! George, this is so sudden, but if you promise to have me pho- 
tographed by Taber, No. S Montgomery street, after we are married, 
you can buy the ring." 

1,000 Different Kinds 
Of useful Christmas presents for $5 and upward. Come and see for 
yourself. Chadbourne's, 7-11, 743 and 745 Market street. 

HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 



$gjg£^ 



FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



Uuder Grim<l Hotel. 



[Dec. 17. 



RAHTJEN'S COMPOSITION 

FOR 

IRON AND WOODEN SHIP BOTTOMS, 
Which protects them against Rust and Fouling, keeping their surface 
smooth and slippery for one year. 

E. W. TRAVERS, Agent, 

Dec. 3. J No. 10 Market Street, San Francisco. 

" "^ T^. (*— ^ c t- t*^. ~F! nr" i t" *t^*i *T<r irp tt T"?, " 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR BOTH SEXES. 

1707 Powell Streer, Between Union and Filbert. 

SPECIAL FRENCH CLASS daily, from 3:30 to 5 r. m. Courses of French 
and English on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from R to 9:30 p. M. 

Circulars giving a full history of the Institute, its objects and terms, will 
be sent to any address upon application. 

[Dec. 10. XAV1KR MEPRET, Director. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

922 POST STREET. 
French, German and English Day aud Boarding School for Youug Ladies 
and Child reu. KINDERGARTEN. 



Sept. 10.] 



MME. B. ZISKA, A. M.,f p rin „,...,, 
MISS MARY LAKE, | Principals. 



MME. WALDO-COHEN, 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 
7275 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MRS. ADA CLARK'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

211 Sutter Street Above Kearny 

HALL TO LET FOR BALLS, CLUBS ETC. [Aug.l. 

Conceded by best judges far supe- 
rior to auy imported, but without ad- 
dition of Brandy. 



Eclipse Extra Dry \ 






SAN PRAM [Si NEWH I.KI IKK. 



U 



TRAVELING 

Ii .vuy n • rah could I*- followed Miiafactorily i.» tin- !>«■- 

ginning of things, it would doubtless lw mod that IraTwing bad fla 
irnl rauxe. A- ihinga stand, howavor, there 
is not much chance of ■ oompleU chniti <■■ evidence being found to 
make certain the precise nature <>f llie in i pulse which f i r ■- 1 started 
men off aa travelers; but no great harm can oome from nan. 
plausible theory, A. love of the chase must be nearly aa old :i-- the 
race. Kan have ever shown ■ fondness for excitement. Hunting 
wild animals hi one ol tin- moat direct means fur securing pleasure In 
that form. The earlieal records, whether legendary or authentic, make 
ml references t" the chase, gods una men each taking a share 
In lis pleasures. To be a hunter then, as now, demanded strength, 
spei -i. courage and n love of adventure, combined with perfect health. 
Neither time, distance nor difficulties were thought of by the men 
who had ■ taste for tin- savory flesh of the deer >»r antelope, or who 
wished to appear decked in the skins of the wolf, leopard or lion. 
They would follow such animals to the ends ol the earth rather than 
lose the distinction of wearing their skins. Forests, mountains and 
streams became familiar to Mich men ; the sun's course by day and 
the positions of the -tars by night were their unerring guide 
By dint of practice they became perfect travelers. Distant and for- 
1 tile plains, picturesque mountains, rich and fragrant forests, were 
ma.il- familiar to them. In due time they led their families, depend- 
ents and flocks to these favored spots of which they had sung songs 
by the flickering light of the Winter tire. 

The Euphrates was doubtless the first stream that carried travelers 
on its broad and rapid bosom. Families were floated down to the 
Persian Gulf; from there they reached India, traveled over that 

grand peninsular, and from there sent out adventurous spirits, w D.0 

skirted tin- coasts of Arabia, and by way of the Ued Sea reached the 
Mediterranean, where the first seamen were known as Phoenicians. 
The prolific sail oi India kept the stream full; the Argon race peopled 
tin- talandfl of I Ireece, tin- fertile shores of the Mediterranean, passed 
through the pillars of Hercules, and reached Britain, That was the 
limit of travel during the early centuries; it was made by land for 
pleasure and excitement , by sea for profit. When the race became 
well muttered another element came into life- thai of conquest. 
Travelers kept moving east and west, north and south; minstrels, 
bards or resetless heroes, they told tales, sang songs of beautiful 
cities, fertile fields, rich orchards, lovely women, noble men, delicate 

. fabrics, costly minerals, rare gi te shells; the songs fired 

some adventurous listener to raise an army and bring back to Ids 
fellow countrymen spoils from these far-ofl 1 lands. In this manner 

| highways were opened from one country to another, races were 
again and again intermingled, but nearly always to the detriment of 
the conquerors, 

The elements that make up the impulse for travel have ever been 
complex. There has never been a lack of exiles— men who have 
made themselves obnoxious to the Government, and to save their 
ne«ks have had to fly ; others who have broken tin- law, and to escape 
the penalty have been forced to get beyond its jurisdiction. Family 
feuds have always been a potent cause in sending men on long jour- 
neys—the -on living from tin- frown of his father or the reproaches 
of his mother. Keligion, or the religious spirit, has ever been a prom- 
inent spur to travel. In the l'agan eenluries the devout traveled In- 
land or sea for days and weeks to reach some favored shrine; the 
guilty to many distant altars in offer appeasing sacrifices ; the expect- 
ant to the temple of some far-famed oracle, to find the will of the 
Deity. The followers of Mahomet, rich and poor, have for centuries 
made journeys to his tomb at Mecca. The zealous Christian at one 
time deemed "his soul in danger unless he prostrated his boilv before 
the Holy Sepulchre at Jerusalem, or worshiped in the Church of the 
Nativity at Bethlehem. For twelve centuries past a pilgrimage to 
Rome has been the highest proof of zeal that can be offered by a 
member of the Holy Catholic Church. 

The love of change, which seems to be implanted in many men, is 
a potent impulse to travel. It is strongest in youth, and often comes 
before boyhood has been safely passed. The simple desire for adven- 
ture is another cause, strongest where the object is the least defined. 
There is an army of men born into the world who do not know what 
they want, and only find out when experience is driven into them by 
hard knocks. That traveling was long anterior to the records of his- 
tory, the distribution of the human race is a manifest proof. No 
records arc extant to show how the first journeys were made through 
Northern Asia or how the passage across Behring's Sea was made. 
Only analogies can be ottered to prove how the American continent, 
north and south of the Equator, received its first inhabitants. The 
islands of the South Pacific Ocean were doubtless peopled by travel- 
ers from Hindostan. The claims of the Brahmins to great antiquity 
rest upon far more solid foundations than careless thinkers tieem 
probable. One fact is beyond dispute, and that i.s that travel is a 
venerable custom, older Irian the pyramids. It is a fair inference that 
journeys by land and sea have always maintained a very even foot- 
ing. The science of navigation may not be very old, but a knowledge 
of the winds and currents of the ocean came very early to the race. 
Land traveling has always been easy; the formationof mountain 
ranges and the course of great rivers have always been a sufficient 
guide for whoever would follow either. It is remarkable that the 
portion of the world where traveling began remains at present in 
very much the same condition that the first travelers found it many 
centuries ago. Asia Minor has only natural highways ; the few roads 
cut by the armies of Persia and Greece were allowed to go to ruin. 
The road followed by the caravans that once journeyed from the In- 
dus to the Nile never had any artificial aid to make it passable or 
safe. The provision made for the safety or comfort of travelers 
throughout all Oriental countries has ever been of the poorest kind, 
and to-dayis in some respects behind the conditions found four thou- 
sand years ago. Traveling has always had its risks. For many cen- 
turies sea travelers were the prey of pirates, and those who made 
long journeys by land had to run the gauntlet of bands of robbers. 
Pirates and brigands are now rare, but not quite extinct. But travel- 
ers are still preyed upon ; they claim that advanced civilization is not 
an absolute protection. 



rid. ai 

■ 



the 
■ inprc 



The development 

nineteenth i 

many barbarous regions, I 

be de 

n pleasure html ; the other ol frugal mind 

tire hum, the world to da\ ; if not, 

Btrictl) speaking, in company, thev are certainly side b) Ide. The 
era are reputedly ri< h; al i well- 

. : "vs in coml ince. The men "i 

business who trnve) arenotull poor. Manyot them have ni 
fortunes, and travel to increa . their wealth. Thej have the spirit 
"' \l* nquerod the Onam 

Id about them, thej l trl forth to demand I 
far-ofl nations, in sharp contra I to these there Is a constant stream 
ol travt men who were once merchants, but who 

failed in business, and can be wen hurrying ofl to distant lands to 
try ami repair their damaged or shal En the 

scale streams of men can be found traveling work me 

i ■ . ■. ■ 
tied with former employments; they are all seeking new scenes of 

labor, where many will find difii cullies never put down in their notes 

of anticipation. Bast and west, north and south, streams of such 

travelers are rushing along; early and late, in Winter and Mi miner. 

pas-in- each other on land and sea, without a glance ol recognition, 

and only with the Cn ptions Of the ultimate effect of tin—' 

constant chan 

The most remarkable feature of all this hurrying to and fro is the 

demand made for speed: rich and poor alike want to fly. Whether 

business or pleaSUre.iS tin- aim, -peed is equally called lor. By land 
every traveler wants to be at his journey's end within the 

amallesl limit of time. With speed has come comfort and luxury. 
Flying palaces, bj sea and land, are now* provided for whoever is con 

tent to bear the cost. Kings and princes ean now travel at the rate 
of forty miles an hour, with ail the attention, pomp and ceremony 
which was wont to be otl'ered them when the pace was Hunted to 
forty miles a day. There is absolutely no limit to the luxury which 
wealth ean Command while Hying around the globe. Nothing need 
be written about (he transformations which travel has worked upon 
hotels. Within a century inn- were often harbors for robbers. Now 
they are p a laees, where king- aiv en tertained. Within two centuries 
gentlemen traveling through Europe had to provide themselves with 
endless letters of infrodurtion to secure suitable entertainment on 
the journey. The man who then contented himself with the public 
entertainment provided in the best hotels of the largest cities was 
looked at with doubtful, if not suspicious, glances. 

Travel has a practical side; it is a positive educator: it both quick- 
ens and broadens the perceptions, and gives a tone of healthy liber- 
ality to the mind. Men may lie perfectly educated without it, in a 
literary sense, but no man's education can be thoroughly rounded 
Off who has not had the advantage of seeing beyond the hills ol his 
native village. There 18 a strong philosophical side to travel. It is 
steadily working towards universal language and literature. The 
most exclusive nations of the world are now speaking and reading the 

English language. Travelers have carried both to the wildest g< irget i if 
the Himalayas, to the sacred slope- of [fussigama, amongst the eternal 
snows of the Andes the English language is spoken; and it is familiar 
to the ears of the negroes in Central Africa, 

The changes wrought by travel within two generations arc small in 
con i pari son with the transitions which must take place before another 
sixty years has been marked oil on the book of time. The mingling 
of races will then be a study for the most accurate thinkers. The 
American continent, and especially the United Slates, will in that 
Space have absorbed many millions of Europeans, Unions, Germans, 

Italians, Scandinavians, French and Spanish. They will have one 
language and literature, and it wisely managed, one government, the 
most powerful ami liberal in the world. 

Such is the manifest destiny of travel, and whoever ignores its 
potency as a factor in education, good government, financial and 
social progress, proves himself bm half informed. 

S"i> Francisco, January 14, 1888. 

English Milkweed Face Powder, 

White, Flesh, Pink and Cream Tints. 

The ollly harmless beautifier. Used exclusively in the Courts of Europe. 

EDWIN W. JOY, 
Nov. 12.) 852 Market Street, Sole Agent. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FOR BOYS 

I ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 1 

g SA-UST MATEO, CAL. 

S CLASSICAL SCHOOL,! 

Under Military Discipline. 



Special Attention and Advantages f"r Fitting Boys for a Scien- 
tific or Classical Course. 

REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, Principal. 



5 



TWENTY-TWO YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL WORK ! 

EASTER TERM WILL OPEN JANUARY 8th. 

DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 

J. COOPER, 

MEBCHA1TT TAILOB. 

24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building. [Dec. 17. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S HUMILIATION. 

TLefact that an epidemic of smallpox is raging in San Francisco 
is an indelible disgrace to this city. No civilized community has a 
right to suffer such an infliction. Smallpox is even more easily pre- 
ventable than diphtheria, which recently paid us a long visit at our 
invitation. We have blundered wantonly into our present position, 
and unless the official leopard can change his spots, we shall soon 
progress to one a good deal worse. In the first place, a long course 
of municipal parsimony had prepared the way for an epidemic. Our 
officers had become educated to the practice of a hand-to-mouth 
economy. Everything was to be done by makeshifts, or not at all. 
No thorough work in any direction was permissible. Just at the 
critical moment, Health Officer Meares fell ill, and a fussy incapable 
was appointed to replace him. Then the Health and Police Depart- 
ments engaged in an animated competition to see which could do the 
more effective work in spreading the pestilence. The Health author- 
ities refused to admit patients to the Pesthouse on the certificate of 
the Police Surgeon, and refused to station an inspector and an am- 
bulance at the old City Hall to receive the infected victims who were 
accustomed to call every day at the Receiving Hospital. The police 
declined to have anything to do with any measures to check the 
disease. They directed patients to go to the Health Office, which in- 
volved a walk of a mile through crowded streets, or a ride of- the 
same distance in crowded cars. At last the Board of Health put up 
a tent ill Portsmouth Square for the temporary reception of the suf- 
ferers. This structure, besides being a matchless dollar limit adver- 
tisement of San Francisco's attractions, affords an admirable stimu- 
lus to the undertaking business. For a smallpox patient to remain 
in it on a freezing morning is as good as a death warrant. 

The Pesthouse, the crown of San Francisco's sanitary system, is a 
fitting cap to such a structure. It contains 125 patients and only one 
stove. The physician in charge appears to take no precautions for 
the public safety or the welfare of the inmates. It is said on good 
authority that a supply of whisky was recently smuggled into the 
building, and that the nurses indulged in a general and hilarious 
drunk. It is certain that three patients have escaped, and that one 
of them was afterward found naked in a vacant lot. The manage- 
ment of the place is simply barbaric. It is revolting to think that 
respectable persons afflicted "with light cases of varioloid may be sent 
I to a house crowded with disreputable characters, reeking with the 
poison of confluent smallpox, and unprovided with the commonest 
appliances of comfort. No wonder so many cases of the disease are 
concealed. 
The Board of Health a few days ago so far recognized the gravity 
! of the situation as to order its office kept open all night. Previously 
j the office had been managed somewhat on the principle of a bank, 
i "No smallpox attended to after office hours" had been the rule. 
' What the Board should do now is to end the epidemic. It can be 
| done at some slight expense, and the money is available. The pres- 
| ent system of herding all the patients who can be caught in a single 
infected pen should be abolished. A large piece of ground in the out- 
i skirts of the city should be procured, and fifty or sixty small, tem- 
j porary houses put up. More ambulances should be bought and kept 
; in readiness day and night at the points where they are most needed. 
I The ridiculous and inhuman tent in Portsmouth Square should be 
burned, and a well-warmed, portable house put in its place. The 
force of inspectors should be so increased that any suspected house 
could be visited at a moment's notice. All this would cost a little 
money, not to speak of a little official diligence and common sense, 
but when thirteen cases of smallpox in a day are reported in a city 
that should not have one in a year, it is time to spend the money 
and advertise for the common sense. 



THE NEW YORK "HERALD'S" SENSATION. 

The New York " Herald's " proverbial enterprise is a little at 
fault in giving to the world as fresh news, a four year old story. It 
has published and telegraphed all over the country an exposure that 
was first made in the News Letter years ago. It has had a special 
commissioner in Humboldt county, who finds that " a syndicate, 
composed principally of foreign capitalists, has gobbled up G4.000 acres 
of the finest redwood forests in the world. A number of notorious 
land sharks were hired by the company and sent to Eureka, where 
they soon had their plans perfected for the fraud. The headquarters 
of the gang were in the back room of a gin shop of a local sport 
whose establishment was the resort of the rough floating population. 
Three blocks away from the saloon was located the United States 
Land Office. The area of land sought by the conspirators was so 
vast that a smalt array of men was required to go through the form 
of entering and proving as required by the laws of the United States 
in the disposal of the public domain. The sum fixed by the company 
as compensation was $50 per head. For that paltry sum men went 
to the Land Office and made oath to the allegation that the land they 
had entered under the beneficent laws of Uncle Sam was for their 
individual use and occupancy. As soon as the entry was made the 
men were escorted to headquarters, where the land was transferred 
to the syndicate. Thus was that chapter of crime completed, and 
the raid on 64 ,000 acres of growing timber, among the most valuable in 
the world, was fully consummated." The story of the Herald, though 
not new, is true, every word of it. Our readers will remember that 
the firm of Faulkner, Bell & Co., of this city, were associated with 
the grab. The News Letter published the facts over four years ago, 
and the firm engaged Frank Pixlev to roundly abuscus for so doing. 
Subsequently the prime movers in the steal were indicted for perjury 
in the United States Courts in this city, and the indictments, strange 
to .say, have not yet been disposed of. Demurrers were filed which 
were overruled some two or three months since. If the Herald, or 
any of its contemporaries which printed its lengthy telegram, would 
overhaul the proceedings in the United States Courts a public service 
would be done. One more example would be afforded of how those 
courts deal with public offenders. The witnesses are now scattered 
far and wide, and nobody will ever be punished. 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 

The grand old man who put through the Suez Canal in spite of all 
the prophets of ill-omen, keeps pegging away at the ditch across the 
Isthmus of Darien, and if he only lives to keep up his lick.it is pretty 
sure that he will have the great ocean highway completed before the 
readers of our dailies are permitted to knowthefact that it is making 
sure and certain progress. That the canal will be put through is now 
certain. There is too much money sunk in it to permit of its aban- 
donment. When, as is now the case, the expense of going ahead to 
the end would be less than the loss involved in its being given up, the 
final result cannot he in doubt. It is now cheaper to succeed than 
fail. Despite the many irresponsible statements to the contrary, it is 
certain that reasonable progress is being made, and this is now ad- 
mitted by the most recent Associated Press dispatches. A. L. Rivers, 
Superintendent of the Panama Railway Co., has just returned from 
Aspinwall to New York, and in a published interview he says that 
" great injustice has been done to the DeLesseps enterprise by most 
of the United States papers. Unfavorable reports have been actuated 
by parties financially opposed to the scheme, and partly by those who 
do not like the idea of the French people controlling this great work 
on the American continent. The air ought to be cleared of the idea 
that the French Government has any control over the canal. The 
progress that is being made is most encouraging, and DeLesseps will 
assuredly achieve success. The reports about the climate have been 
greatly exaggerated. It is not a paradise, of course, but any man of 
good health and sound body can live there as well as in his own land 
if he takes care of himself." The Canal Company's treasury is by no 
means in the bankrupt condition it was reported to be in some time 
ago. The contractors are being promptly paid, and the work goes 
regularly on. There have been some changes in the plans, which will 
considerably expedite matters. Some fine day, before most of us are 
aware of it, there will be a grand expedition from this city to cele- 
brate the successful opening of the canal to the commerce of the 
world. 

BERNAL, THE BANDIT. 

A few short weeks ago the news came that the Mexican Govern- 
ment, awakening at last to its obligations and duties, had offered a 
reward of $10,000 for the capture or suppression of the bandit Bernal, 
the brutal murderer of Leon Baldwin and the terror of all the border 
States, and now the still more satisfactory news arrives that the large 
reward offered has had its effect, and that Bernal has been sent 
"where the wicked cease from troubling." The Mexican authorities 
have at last demonstrated what they could have done at the first if 
they had but exercised " due diligence." As friendly neighbors, in- 
viting commerce, trade and intercourse with the United States, their 
duty, according to the comity and law r of nations, as well as accord- 
ing to the usages that prevail betweeu civilized people, ought long 
ago to have moved them to the diligent and effective action which 
pressure at last drove them to adopt with so much success. They 
were bound at all times to exercise due diligence in the protection of 
the lives and property of American citizens peaceably and lawfully 
domiciled in their midst. As a de facto Government, they were bound 
to make their Government effective. If for years, or even for months, 
they allowed themselves to be superceded by one of their own citizens, 
turned plunderer and assassin, they rendered themselves liable for 
the damages that United States citizens sustained by reason of his 
organized lawlessness. It will not do to say, and it will not be true 
if it be said, that they were unaware of Bemal's proceedings. The 
proofs are overwhelming that they were fully informed in regard to 
his organized attacks upon life, property and the constituted order of 
things, long ago. Mexican troops actually encountered him and his 
handsome two years since, but being defeated, withdrew and left him 
to pursue his career unchecked. Thenceforward the Mexican Gov- 
ernment was clearly responsible for his acts of war upon American 
citizens. Secretary Bayard does not seem to be the firmest of men, 
but he ought to be'firm enough to maintain a position that it is not 
possible to successfully assail. 

dr. r. h. Mcdonald. 

Unhappily, in this envious, carping world of ours, it is too much 
the fashion to endeavor to pull down, rather than build up. The 
world is full of malice, envy and all uncharitableness, and it loves a 
shining mark at which to direct its most poisoned arrows. The man 
who stands out from the average of his fellows in the matter of mild- 
ness, manners and good morals, is pretty sure to have a pack of 
tattooed and leprous men yelping at his heels. The more sedate, the 
more retiring and the more correct his ways are, the more malicious 
are the creatures who are conscious that a good man's silent example 
is their most poignant condemnation. Society, as times go in all too 
many portions of God's fair earth, is more tolerant of roues and rakes 
thanit would be of Him who went about doing good. Yet, withal, 
there is, deep down in the hearts of men, a sense of respect for aims 
that are directed, in all sincerity, towards the ennobling, rather than 
the belittling of human character. The sincerity once established, 
the respect follows. These truisms will appeal with force to every 
thoughtful person who has contemplated certain things that have 
been developed during the progress oi the Clara Belle McDonald trial. 
We do not propose to discuss that unhappy proceeding. It is right; 
however, that, whilst injury is done to none, proper appreciation 
should be meted out where it is due. Whatever else results from the 
trial, it is certain that Dr. R. H. McDonald comes out of as tryingan 
ordeal as ever man passed through, with honor to his manhood and 
with credit to his character. He stands higher in this community 
than he ever did before. It is seen that in the most difficult circum- 
stances of life he has been the Christian gentleman. His private 
correspondence has been dissected by unfriendly hands, yet in every 
line the true man stands out unimpeached and unimpeachable. 
Thousands of people who were prejudiced, they knew not why, now 
recognize that at heart, and in his daily life, Dr. McDonald is a sin- 
cere and a true man. We are moved to say this from a strong sense 
of what every line of his private correspondence reveals. 



Jan. II. lS.Ks. 



<\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



18 



TOWN CRIER. 

'Hear the Oriel What the •l.vi] art IhnuV 

'Ouo ih»t will play the devil, mt. with 



The funeral ol Mr. Sutton, ■ n ngerol olaiueda < tannty, 

win* was, unfortunately, hanged las I munth for Qllfng another re 
■peeled granger toll ol lead, was n wry tt (feeling affair. It need 
hardly be said that Oakland 'lit! itself full credit, and the remains, 
with ilic exception of the head, which had been almost severed rrom 
the bodv In Ida banginXt looked beautiful. The choir sang "Joans, 
lover of my aoui," and " Nearer my Uod, t" Thee.* 1 There was an 
abnndanoe of Bowers, the ooffln was of black walnut, the hearse was 
followed i<> the grave by an Imposing array uf weeping mourners, 
and Mr. Mitt. m was Interred in the plot reserved f<»r single men in 
the Mountain View Cemetery. The lessons o( this funeral are many 
an. 1 various. They teach us that Oakland bas a genuine respect for 
any martyr who will relieve the monotony of that village by submit- 
ting ti > be hanged, and thus give an impetus to real estate by offering 

an inducement to Bastern buyers to c in and purchase. Mr. 

Sutton''- crime was a singularly deliberate and Odd-blooded assassin- 
ation, but not being under the influence of liqnor when he shot down 
bis enemy, Oakland honored him. The interment of Mr. Sutton in 
tin- plot reserved tor single men is an awful warning against the crime 
of celibacy, The youth who remains unmarried after this, and thus 
takes the chance of having a murderer for a nave-fellow, must be 
indeed a hardened scoundrel, destitute of all self-respect, What the 
deuce Is the good of escaping the matrimonial halter, if the fellow 
who perishes by the hempen halter i> to -hire one's moid, get all the 
benefit of his shrubbery and divide the honors which accrue to those 
who populate the cemetery, enrieh the stone-COtters, and give some 
of our San Francisco florists a chance to nip freshly culled- flowers 
from new-made graves to grace our society wedding parties? 

A mourning husband had doubts about the sincerity of his wife's 
demise the other day, and most incautiously communicated his sus- 
picions to the undertaker who had obtained the job of laying the 
lamented lady to rest. The undertaker was, of course, professionally 
incredulous, and filled, moreover, with horror and dismay at the 
possibility »>f Losing a fee. So, at the earnest solicitation of the 
anxious widower, he first knived the remains and then placed them 
on ice. Whereupon the doctors rush wildly upon the scene and de- 
clare that if the unfortunate woman were in a trance, and not dead, 
the undertaker had spoiled the only possible chance of resuscitation, 
by tirst taking the blood so necessary for the reanimation of the vital 
organs, and. then freezing her to make the business complete. I can- 
not find it in my heart to blame that undertaker. Business is busi- 
Dess, and if a corpse comes into his parlor to stay until removed in 
we regular, legitimate and professional way, allattempts to bring 
that corpse back to the animate world are out of order and should 
not be tolerated. The body was warm. To correct this incongruity^ 
the undertaker put it on ice. His instincts, humane and profession- 
al, prompted him to immediately check any such irregularity as a 
warm corpse. Where would those bards who write about death's 
cold buna: be if a remains were permitted to sustain an unnatural 
temperature? This should be a warning to the bereaved to work the 
resuscitation racket at home, and not attempt to war against the 
undertaker, who is not to be swindled out of his dead. 

To every mortal who builds rhymes there are certain words which 
suggest a fascinating jingle. For example, in the testimony in the 
Clara Belle case, I read of one Benjamin who is employed as bell-boy 
at the Baldwin. I am at once permeated with regret that Benjamin 
was not more prominently mixed up in that matter, because the 
name, the place and the occupation have such an alliterative har- 
mony : 
Who, on the evening of the tragedy knocked at the Doctor's door? 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin, 
Who told him Clara Belle was there, but told him nothing more? 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin. 
Who in the elevator seat, forever on the move. 
Sees many amorous winks and hears full many a tale of love, 
And many a scented note conveys to seal-skin plumaged doves? 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin. 
\\ r ho, when the bacchanalian comes doth gently take his arm, 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin, 
And steers him deftly to his seat, protecting him from harm? 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin. 
Who brings next morning to his bed a three-ply brandy shake, 
Before whose soothing magic flies every ugly snake, 
And smilingly his little tip for this good work doth take? 

Benjamin, the bell-boy at the Baldwin. 
What has become of the female barber? I distinctly remember 
when that fad was first introduced. It was a sort of speculation on 
the old forty-nine spirit that could see nothing but beauty and ele- 
gance in any sort or female, and that considered to be pawed by the 
paw of lovely woman was worth sacks of gold dust. And it took, but 
only for a little space. The female barber was not a success. She 
lathered the granger's beard and rubbed the soap between his tobac- 
co-stained lips, but it was a greasy, oily, bay-rummy sort of mash, 
quite in keeping with the fifteen cent character of the shave. I re- 
joiced when the folly ran out its length, and the female barber took 
her attractions to another market. For I have no faith in the sooth- 
ing qualities of the feminine hand. It tends too much to nails and 
does not sympathize with the masculine chin. 

Fetaluma points proudly to the fact that the mercury in that town 
has been lower than in any village in the State. I have never been 
able to understand why Fetaluma and Milpitas should have been 
selected as places where all sorts of absurd incidents were supposed 
to occur. Tne Petaluma maiden is wide awake all the time, and no 
Milpitas man has ever been taken in and done for in a bunko game 
or any kindred transaction. It is in the old San Franciscan, who be- 
lieves that he knows everything on the face of the globe, that the 
sleek-haired swindler finds his easiest victim. 



Bomb, scrub, rub, rul md keep th 

chine moving while the M.i uld -,,iled linen i- els tnscd lii 

acrutin tory, no m.itter boa one 

loon at it. \ - - onatrucl a rattling 

lelodramo ir tin- material There arc Iota of chestnut 

gediennes wl mid pla; Unra hello, and thee I doctoi affords an 

ent opportunity to the old man nctor to make a hit, The con- 
fiding husband Ned Buckley or J >bn Malone might do, although on 
second thoughts, 1 think I would pn Buckley for t* 

Luh Swalm, the villain of tin piece, and, by gad. Nod Is not un- 
like the smooth-tongued Bcnem I !,-■ comedy portion ol th. 
would be sustained by Benjamin, the bell-boy ol the Baldwin, ana 
Mrs. Clara's nurse, the oubn tto, I diould drop the curtain in the 

sec i id just at that period when the doctor gel a of the 

silver-mounted pistol, the polieenmn iighasl in the background, Benj 
wuli the Bflver-hilted daggi i plated properties would 

owed on the stage), and) don't know but Jasparand Mark, In attitudes 



uakeup the tableau. This Is e golden 
. and if the amenities of the tale 



of horror, might be accessary to i 
opportunity for the local dramatist 

were Only fitirly preserved, there would be lots to rake in at the box- 

offlce. 

Oh, the gossip, the gossip of these women I It makes seven eighths 
ot the mischief m this world, The only excuse I have for th" bus- 
bands of Holland, who harness their wives to the plows, j> that 
when they lake the harness off, the worthy helpmates are too tired 
to gOSSip. But here, alas! W e daren't hitch them up to anything 
more Oppressive than a plate of ice cream or an oyster slew , and the 

result is, of course, disastrous: 

When lovely women stoop to chatter. 

Because they've nothing else to do, 
Great magpie! how those dear ones clatter, 

And talcs of damaged lives accrue. 
How Mrs. Prim has got a lover, 

And poor old Prim is all afloat; 
How Mrs. Green eye did discover 

A billet-doux in Greeneye'fl coat. 
How Miss Diana, minx courageous. 

With old Bi metal nightly sups; 
How Flossv's husband grows outrageous, 

Aud tells vile stories in his cups. 
The only act to cure this folly 

And scandals current check, I vow, 
Is spank the gossips well with holly, 

Or hitch them to the Dutchman's plow. 

One Burton vowed that he would marry twenty-five women, but 
the law snaffled him when he scored the fifth. Mr. Burton is a Geor- 
gian, and is too much of an epicurean, sah, to be allowed to nm 
loose. He was a bold man, but they do say that one gets used to 
matrimony just as warts, and when he once acquires (heart of stand- 
ing off the parson for the wedding fees, takes a wife as coolly as a 
cup of coffee, and don't give a fig whether he pleases her or Dot, 
knowing that he can drop her at any time and go in for another. It 
might not be out of place here to say that the fellow who would face 
twenty-five mothers-in-law, seriatim, is composed of no ordinary 
clay. 

With all sympathy and regard for Grandma Hurley, Little 
George, Mrs. Held and Nurse Ivooshar, I think that it really" is about 
time those worthy and very prominent characters should be retired 
into private life. I admire the Examiner's broad charity, and 1 re- 
spect the efforts it has made for these unfortunate people, although 
I believe Kooshar, who is a dynamiter by profession, is not included 
in the clientele. But one gets tired of Grandma Hurley, and Little 
George should be permitted to rest until his milk teeth become due, 
when we will gladly receive all bulletins anent that important event. 

A California heiress has married a penniless clerk in the Kast. It 
is hardly necessary to state that the clerk was an Ohio man. Ohio 
men get all the good things of this earth. It seems to me that the 
California heiress is a very wayward sort of animal. She shies hor- 
ridly at the Native Son of the Golden West, and goes off and takes 
one of those cold-blooded fellows who have no idea of climate, and 
never saw a live orange on a tree in the course of their lives. 

Benson will miss the nice society of Copenhagen when Marshal 
Franks gets him by the lug of the ear. For Copenhagen is a real nice 
capital, and Mr. Benson must have had lots of fun playing the national 
kissing game, so deservedly popular at our Sunday picnics. Benson's 
bondsmen were after him. They did not take kindly to the idea of 
paying seventeen thousand dollars to Uncle Sam for Mr. Benson's 
body, a commodity they did not regard as worth as many cents. 

The frost has had a numbing effect upon the utterances of the 
climate boomers, and Kate Field, who wrote back the other day to 
Boston about California ladies wearing muslin dresses in San Fran- 
cisco streets, has lost her reputation for veracity. As a New York 
lady, who, tempted by Miss Field's tropical pictures, came out here 
with nothing but her Summer wardrobe, exclaimed, "I never could 
have believed it of Bachelor Kate." 

O'Donnell, O'Donnell, toujour.? O'Donnell! Is there no power- 
physical, legal, mechanical or anywise— that can put this uneasy per- 
son to rest? When the itch for notoriety gets into the cuticle of a fel- 
low of his kind, nothing but the constant scratching of the heaviest 
kind of club will exterminate it. What the deuce has this city done 
that it should continue to be inflicted with an O'Donnell? 

A Chicago lumberman went insane in Los Angeles. Ever ready 
to thrust the slightest straw into the boom, the Los Angeles papers 
claim that this madness was due to the consciousness of his inability 
to furnish timber enough for the ninety-nine suburban villages which 
surround that climatic center. 

From the ferocious tone in which the dailies speak of Hamburg, 
the half-interest expert, it is the intention to have that rascal chopped 
into thin pieces in the legal sausage-machine— in short, to make a 
Hamburg steak of him. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



TO MY IVORY CALENDAR OF '87. 
Dainty remembrance of the days agone, 
Sent by a friend when the old year was new, 
The sacred ness of many a Summer's dawn, 
Filled with bird twitterings from nests I knew 
In forest glades— the mountain peaks, the sunset sky, 
The deep, sweet music of the pine's low sigh, 
They all are brought to me again by you, 
And your black figures, ah, but what they held 
To bursts of joy or floods of sorrow swelled. 
A few, and those were best, held sweet content 
By simple ways and homely duties lent. 
Short were those days, these long that served to mark 
Full many an hour of anguish when the spark 
Of the dear life we loved was almost gone. 
These just below recall the happy days 
When Heaven restored her to our yearning gaze, 
This one should have the rainbow's glorious hue. 
It brought a promise from a heart so true 
That earth seemed Heaven, his love a smile from God, 
And this should speak as stainless lilies do, 
From out the Lender warmth of emerald sod. 
So young she was, so gentle, loving, wise 
O'er all life's thorny way, 'neath darksome skies 
She passed on murmuring, 'till God bade her rise 
And took the earth veil from her trusting eyes. 
What are they seeing now? We cannot tell; 
We only know with her that all is well. 
And so I count this day one writ in white. 
And this one, also, near the long year's close, 
When a dear babe passed from his mother's sight, 
Gathered in earliest youth— a budding rose — 
To God, his father, never more to know 
Earth's toil, or crushing care, or bitter woe. 
So, wrapped in peace and pain the record ends, 
For all it brought it still to me is dear. 
Sacred with memories of angel friends, 
I lay away this record of the year. 
San Francisco, January 14, 1888. Alice Denison. 

FANCY DRESS AND HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 
Since the coming fancy-dress ball (to which we need not more 
particularly allude) has shaken society to its foundations, an arid and 
nearly frantic inquiry into history and costume has been in progress. 
Artless maidens have dipped their pink noses into by-gone literatures 
and opened their mild eyes in wonder at the queer records found 
under grave " old calf " bindings. The plays of the great Mr. Con- 
greve and the ingenious Mr. Wycherley; the staid Memoirs of An- 
thony Hamilton, due de Grammont; the works of Sir G. Sedley.that 
" standard " British author; the lite and times of the First Gentle- 
man of Europe, and of the Grand Monarque and of the grand monar- 
que's admirable grandson, have all been investigated by the buds 
who have made surprising discoveries. More ancient periods have 
been examined and the Biographic Universelle and Mr. Planche's work 
upon costume have been in constant request. One young person 
who had prepared with great care a costume of the Directoire was 
driven to ner room by an irate papa with contumelious and iniurious 
language. Another, as a Grecian goddess aesthetically draped — very 
chaste— was seen by a young gentleman whose attentions instantly 
ceased. Reports most disadvantageous to her person have since be- 
come current. A married lady whose rapidly increasing family 
marks her as a true patriot, will go as a Vestal Virgin. One sweet 
brunette insists on personating Gabriel d'Estrie'es " because (she says) 
her fourth feller was a Honorary and so is her'n " — a confusing con- 
dition of language and ideas. Several young "fellers" from the 
marts of trade will hire garments from the mimic stage. One imag- 
inative being, unable to makea choice between two gorgeous costumes 
and to prevent either from adorning the person of a rival, has hired 
both, and will appear first as the Prance Deleen and later as Martial 
Saxehorn. He understands that the first was famous as a dancer 
and the second a military amateur who bequeathed his name to his 
favorite instrument. The News Letter, as Arbiter Elegantiarum, 
will be present wearing Arbiter's own court-suit, which has been bor- 
rowed for the purpose from the Vatican. 

A LUCKY MAN. 

William Leslie "Wins a $5,000 L<ftusiana Lottery Prize —The 
last drawing of The Louisiana State Lottery has rendered at least one 
San Franciscan happy, and he is William Leslie, who resides with 
his family at 2,505 California street. He had the good fortune to hold 
a one-tenth ticket in the second capital prize of $50,000, his share be- 
ing $5,000, the money being drawn through the agency of Wells, Far- 
go & Co. on November 22nd. 

A reporter yesterday called upon Mr. Leslie, who is employed in 
the type-casting department of Palmer & Rey's type foundry, at 407 
Sansome street, and requested him to explain the circumstances that 
attended his good fortune. 

" Well, sir," said he, with a smile, " I bought my ticket from a fel- 
low laborer of mine just two days before the drawing, paying him .|1 
for it. I do not generally invest in lottery tickets, and when I bought 
this one that won $5,000* I had no idea of the good fortune that await- 
ed me. Imagine my astonishment when, upon picking up the Chron- 
icle the day after the drawing I saw that my ticket, 09,308 had won a 
prize. My investment was a good one and I have no reason to com- 
plain." 

" What will you do with your money? " asked the reporter. 

" I don't know yet, though I expect to go into business for myself 
at an early day." 

Mr. Leslie is about 35 years of age, an industrious workman, and is 
well liked by all who know him. His good stroke of fortune has not 
yet completely turned his head and doubtless will not. Though earn- 
ing a good salary as type-caster, it is likely that with his new found 
wealth he will engage'in mercantile pursuits, for which he has a great 
liking. — Sun Franc hen (Cai, ) < 'hmnicir, ]Yoirmbcr 30. 



i:srsTT:R_A_:r>rc:E.. 



Loans Negotiated on Real Estate! 

NO CHARGE 

For Commission or Attorney's Fees if the borrower is a policy-holder in the 

CALIFORNIA TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY. 

206 Sansome Street 



REFERENCES: 

The German Savings and Loan Society, Security Savings Bank, the leading 
Commercial Banks and the Real Estate Agents. [Jan. 14. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 15,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & iJO., 
Nov. 18,] No. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

ALL THE POLICIES OF THE 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF BOSTON 

ARE PROTECTED FROM FORFEITURE BY THE 

NEW MASSACHUSETTS NON-FORFEITURE LAW. 

Tne Company indorses the liberal and yearly Progressive CASH SUR- 
RENDER and PAID-UP INSURANCE values prescribed by the lawin full in 
tabular form on every policy, thus giving the policy the convenient form 
of A BOND OF YEARLY INCREASING VALUE, and the Policy-holder may 
thus at any time know the precise value of his Policy. 

B£- Before insuring in any other Company, or joining any Co-operative 
Assessment Society, consult any local agent of this Company, or the un- 
dersigned, HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

March 2C.J 324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Principal Office 416 California Street 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital $ 750,000 

Assets, Over 1,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurauce Co, of California. 

officers: 

GUSTA VE TOUCHAKD. . .President | J. O. KITTLE Vice-President 

JaS. D. BAILEY Secretary. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 273 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco, 

JAMES JJKUMMOND MACPHERS0N, Manager. 

London Office— No. 2 Royal Exchange Avenue, Cornhill, E. C. [March 5. 

ANGLO-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, $2,000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

Bankers: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[Sept. 10.] 

AMERICAN STEAM BOILER INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF NEW YORK CITY. 

CAPITAL AUTHORIZED $1,000,000 

CAPITAL PAI0 UP $500,000 

Policies cover all loss or damage to PROPERTY or LIFE resulting 
from Explosion or Rupture of Steam Boilers. Inspections quarterly 
by Skilled Inspectors. 

CONRAD & MAXWELL, 

(Fire and Marine Underwriters,) 

Aug. 27.] Gen'l Agts. for Pacific Coast, 421 California St. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

CAPITAI $1,600,000.00 

SURPLUS 214.210.18 

ASSETS, Ian. 1st, 1886 1.192,662.21 

INVESTED IN the U. S 601,856,48 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky 
Mountains. [Dec. 31. 



J:m. 14, 188S. 



SAN FRANCIS. .1 NEWS LETTER. 



15 



BIZ." 



Business Mine fch« roafa ol the holiday season hai been ex< eedlngly 
dull. Uutie » number »>( ships, however, h iv« been lecured ■■• 
Wlic.it snd Flour for the Coitetl ku, .-.ii.ni, bul at Ion 

..ml ships, Wbeet-ledened, en route to Great Britain, 

have recently been lost at §ea, bul so tar as »d vised, were fully Enaured , 

toe If-s bsuuj well dlsiributed between home ami foreign Insurance, 

oompanles. Marine loeaes upon the Pacific Coast have o( late been 

quite numerous, chiefly sailing vessels load) i with Coal and Lumber, 

lain i Is made that manj *•;' the ships engaged In the northern 

« losj itinl Lumber carrying trade are overloading, and this is given as 

.•i' tin- many disasters that have ooourred. 

The Paget Bound trade continues to loom op very considerably. 

In December lust '-7 ear] and Lumber were cleared to 

i i.;i>iwi-.i- ami fun-itm ports. < 'i this number, U wore Lumber Laden- 

ad ami carried over 81X100,000 feet ; 24 carrii if ( JoaJ to coast 

ports, which amounted t" over 16,000 tons. The value of tin- Lumber 

carried is placed ut £403,304, while the Coal Is supposed to be worth 

British Columbia exjiorts for December include 20,680 tons Coal 
from Departure Bay: from Nanaimo, 15,900 tons; and from Porl 
Moody, i,i'>" tons. The Lumber exports from Burrard Inlet, is. C, 
were a cargoes, valued al $1 ,955,889. 

Preagbt engagements for the period under review include the fol- 
lowing: ship r. M. Whitmore, 2,140 tons. Wheat to Liverpool direct, 
reported rate £] 1-. Bd.; Nor. bktne. Eidsvoid, 664 tons,Flourto 
Hongkong; ship Bohemia, 1,663 tons, Wheat to Cork, Havre or Ant- 
werp, £1 -i-.; Br. iron ship Angerona, 1,227 tons, Wheat to Cork, £1 
: Br. iron bk. Charles Cotesworth, 1,031 tons, Wheat or Flour 
to Cork, £1 78. 6dt ; Br. iron bk. Golden Gate, 396 tons. Flour to I fork, 
j-i 7a. fld.;* Br. iron ship Drumcraig, 1.919 |tona* Wheat to Cork; Br. 
Iron ship Manx King, 1,702 tons, Wheat to fork. Havre or Antwerp, 
direct i>ort -*. 6u. less; Br. iron ship Victoria Regina. 1,912 
ton-. Wheat to Liverpool direct, £1 2a. 6d.; ship Berlin, 1,533 tons, 
Wheat to Liverpool direct, £1 2s.; Br. iron bk. Brussels, 050 tons, 
\\ heat to fork, £1 12a. Gd.; Br. iron ship Crown of Italy, 1,551 tons, 
from Nanaimo to this port; Br. iron ship Persian Empire, 
1,456 tons, proceeds to San Diego to discharge the cargo of Coal she 
brought here from Newcastle. N.8.W. ; Br. iron ship Ellenbank, 1 426 
ton--, Wheat or Flour to Cork, £1 6s., direct port 2s. 6d. less; Br. iron 
ship Bangalore, 1,698 tons, Wheat to Cork, ownera 1 account; ship Occi- 
dental, l.'-'.l tons, now at this port, Shale or Coal from Sydney to this 
portlShale.il 7a. 6d. ; Coal, £1 3s.) 

Lumber interests at this port constitute a very important share of 
traffic. The receipts at San Francisco for the vear 1887 exceed 328,- 
600,000 feet, divided as follows: Pine, 209,(«>s,jwi feet; Kedwood, 118,- 
ifeet; Railroad Ties to the number of 1,093,536; Shingles to the 
number of 59,689,702. The home and foreign demand for all kinds of 
Lumber during the past year has been good, and at remunerative 
prices.. 

The steamer Australia carried $75,000 Gold Coin for Honolulu. 

Quicksilver receipts at this port for 1887 aggregate, or rather the 
product of all the mines in the Suite, aggregated^ 1,000 flasks. Ex- 
ports by sea for 1887 aggregate 18,110 flasks, value $7;;">,(W1, exclusive 
of 500 tlasks received from London and shipped to China in bond. It 
is ,.nly some sixty days ago that we made any shipments to China in 
two years last past, and that was done in November and December, 
when some 3,000 flasks were sent to China; during the year past we 
sent B,379 flasks to New York; to Mexico, 0,307 Masks, balance scat- 
tering; present price. $48(g$50. 

AN ILLUSTRATION OF "PRACTICAL" POLITICS. 

In the Common Council chamber of the city of Albany is a collec- 
tion of portraits of all the Governors of the State of New York, save 
Governor Hill, though his will be added after he retires from office. 
An interesting story is told of the picture of the late Samuel J. Til- 
den. The order for it was given to a well-known artist named 
Thacher, who, as it proved, possessed more of a warlike spirit than is 
generally credited to his class. The picture was completed and was 

fiven a prominent place in Thacher's studio, where it was exhibited 
y Mr. Tilden's triends, and he was highly praised for his fidelity to 
the original. A "committay" was announced one day, and Mr, 
Thacher showed its members the respect to which representatives of 
the Board of Alderman are always accorded outside of the city of 
New York. Their spokesman commended the " ile picture," and' his 
associates nodded approval of all he said. The former finally called 
the artist aside and informed him that the " Board " was ready to ac- 
cept the portrait and pay the stipulated price of $1,000, " but"— the 
fellow then, in the most business-like manner, said that it would be 
necessary for the Committeemen each to receive $100 before they re- 
ported to the full Board that the picture was "a superb delineation of 
the great leader of the Democracy." That would leave $500 for the 
artist, which would fully compensate him for his time, his brushes 
and his paints. What followed was an exhibition of artistic spirit 
fully aroused. The artist made a speech loud enough to be heard 
down to Custom House, and punctuated with contempt for the com- 
mittee for their past, their present and their future. The committee 
retired indignant and threatening. The artist followed them to the 
door, and told them the city of Albany shouldn't have the picture 
under anv circumstances. For a number of years it stood in his 
studio, till finally the authorities came forward, discharged its obliga- 
tions in full, and transferred Governor Tilden to the Council cham- 
ber. — -fifew York Times. 

Ladies' Chiffoniers, 
With bonnet box and jewel case, with Yale lock, at Chadbourne's, 
711, 713 and 715 Market street. 



Santa Crcz Suburban and Seaside Building Sites still at reasonable 
prices. Also, Vineyards, Orchards and Fruit Lauds totally independent of 
irrigation. Iu a climate of the very happiest medium, surrounded by ex- 
quisite sceuery. Illustrated Price List free by mail. Address 

Exchange and Mart, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



Ti<rs-aieA.2srcE. 
THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Or Liverpool, L. indi n and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 1 10 000.000 

Capital Paid Up j 000.000 

Rtservs Fund (In addition to Capital! .>' I *B t OOC 

Total Assets July 1, 1887 . 8,809,929 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager) 

J"'y !'■ I 305 California Slroet. San Frincltco. 

RANKS ALL. •-Til!-: OLD RELIABLE 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK. 

A. B. FORBES. 
GENERAL AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COA8T, 
214 8AN80ME 8TREET. |8cpt. I 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurtoh— Capital, 5,000,000 Kruno. HELVETIA ol 81 

Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Fra BA1 OIBEol Basle— OapltaL 1,000,0001 

These three companies are liable Jointly and levenulv for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in uti the principal seaports <>f the 
world. In the settlement <-f nil claims under an Euyllsh policy, \\\>--v com- 
panies will Btrlotly adhere to thecoudltl< >ms adopted at Lloyds 
and submit to English jurisdiction. [LARKY W. BY2, Agent, HO California 
Btreet, Baa Francisco. . ! June 9.] 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

FIEE -A-ICnD JVE-A-KJITE. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full $ 200.000.00 

ASSETS. January I, 1887 446.611.09 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized. . 1.681.849.61 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 
(Safe Deposit Bui lding) . [Maroh 19.] Ban Francisco, Cal. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000. 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Corporation of London [Established 1836. J 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.) 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

WM. MACDONALD, Ass't Manager. 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, Safe Deposit Building. 

~ THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL ?10,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM Gcueral Agcut, 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cai. [March 19. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital J9.260.000 

Cash Assets 2.764.876 

Cash Assets In United States 1 ,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March 20. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 

Principal Office •■-. 216 Sansome Street 

r FIRE INSURANCE. 
Capital Paid Up In U. S. Gold Coin $300,000.00 

Assets January 1, 1887 1780,606.22 I Reinsurance Reserve ..J 220,979.66 

Surplus for policy holders.. 77-1, 73-1.22 Losses .since organization. 2,53.3,105.80 

NetSurplusfovercv'ryth'g) 253,75-1.56 Income 1886 361,132. 1-1 

OFFICERS' 

J. P. HOUGHTON... President! CHAS. R.STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. 3HEPARD,. Vice-President I R. II. MAGILL General Agent 
Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.— L. L. Baker. H. L. Dodge, 
J. L. N. Shepard John Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauucey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Rylaud, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 5. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
United States Fire Insurance Co, of New York [Estab. 1 824. J 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 
Western Assurance Company of Toronto, Canada [Estab. 1851 ] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.1 413 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
rFIIE&IE -A-HSTID ZMZ-A-ZRHLNriE. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANSOME STREET, 

% San Franeiaco, California. 

A J BRYANT, CHAS. II. CUSHING, RICHARD IVERS, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Directors— A. J. Bryant, C. D. O'Sullivau, J. M. Donahue, P. 

J White James D. Phelan, D. CallRyluUi, M. Mayblum, E. L. Goldstein, L. 

Cunningham H. W. Seale, Fisher Ames, Dr. C. F. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Joucs, 

Geo. H. Wheaton, T. McMullii Sept. 24. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



THE REAL PROPERTY MARKET. 

As a sign of the times expected to come, there is none that is 
more expressive than the constantly-growing demand for cheap prop- 
erty. It would seem as if a large number of San Franciscans have 
suddenly made up their minds that local real estate is a good specu- 
lative investment, and that they are acting on this newly-formed 
opinion. These seem to be the men who will wish, rather than after- 
ward lament, the fact that they did not " get in " when opportunity 
offered. However that may be, it is certain that there is no better 
opportunity for " getting in " than the present, especially as to out- 
side lands and homestead Lots, for we are just at the ebb-tide, caused 
by a disastrous attempt at booming these properties, and cheaper 
than now they are not likely to be. This would therefore seem to be 
the time to make purchases. The improvement in the condition of 
the market concerning these lands has been felt and noticed for some 
time past, but that the market is decidedly active will be a surprise 
to many. The majority of these transactions are of course in a 
measure speculative, and based on the expectation of seeing these 
kinds of property in actual demand for building purposes at a day 
not far distant. A few sales only need be mentioned to show the 
drift of the market. There were sold 120x150 on the southeast cor- 
ner of 13th and K streets; portions of Outside Land blocks 085, 781, 
38H, 701, 737. 735. 852 872, 853, 705, 828, 77fi, 370, 371, 738 and 303. 

The homesteads in which there have been transfers include the 
Bernal Homestead. Silver Terrace Homestead, Gift Map 4, Fair- 
mount Tract, West End Homestead, Gift Map 2. Market-street Home- 
stead, Bay View Homestead and University Extension Homestead. 
Of course this class of business does not call for much exertion, and 
during exciting times it is apt to be overlooked and slighted. Never- 
theless it is one of the most promising features of the real estate sit- 
uation to-day. 

Besides, it is just dawning upon some of our enterprising and specu- 
lative citizens that there is money to be made in the real estate busi- 
ness when there is such an influx of new people. A very few of the 
shrewdest have heretofore had a monopoly of the business of sub- 
dividing blocks at auction and private sale, and it is now one of their 
grievances that blocks and half blocks fit to pass under the auction- 
eer's hammer in lots of proper size are no longer to be had. Neither 
in the Mission nor in the Western Addition are there many such 
pieces of land available, and the few who still hold them, having been 
shown how a block properly "cut up" will bring from $10,000 to $20,- 
000 more at auction than if sold as a whole at private sale, are very 
careful to readjust their asking prices accordingly. 

The revival in Protrero and South San Francisco lands, first hinted 
at in these columns, is progressing finely. Active steps towards im- 
proving the condition of the streets and roads are in contemplation 
by the owners, with good effect upon the condition of the market. 
Among recent sales there were transfers of portions of Protrero 
Blocks Nos. 221, 222, 302, 57 and 119. 

One after another the prominent banks and business firms seek the 
vicinity of Market street for their business establishments. The latest 
is Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Bank, the directors of which have just per- 
fected an agreement with Mrs. Mary F. S. Hopkins, whereby the lat- 
ter will erect a handsome building on the gore lot of Market and Post 
streets, to be tenanted by the bank. This will be a serviceable im- 
provement indeed. The old barracks now encumbering the lot have 
long been an eye-sore. In this connection it may be mentioned that 
a Pine-street glassware firm has taken a four-years' lease of Nos. 63 
and fi5 First street, and Nos. 412 to 418 Mission street; a portion of 
the Union Foundry Block at $19,200 for the term — rather alow rental 
when the size of the premises is considered. It is the old trouble. 
Property north of Market street is unsuitable for the enlarged de- 
mands exacted by a growing trade, and the landlords do not care to 
improve. They rather prefer to see the business center move south- 
ward. 

The holidays have not resulted in the closing of many transactions 
of importance in the downtown districts. Those to which some in- 
terest attaches are 30x62:6 on the east side of Stuart street, 229 feet 
north of Folsom; 30x80 on the north side of Howard, 340 feet west 
of Third street; 45:10x120 on the south side of Berrv, 229 feet west 
of Sixth street, and 225x100 on the east side of Tenth street, 100 feet 
south of Howard, $11,750. 

The lot 20x50, with improvements, on the west side of Dupont 
street. 56:6 feet north of O'Farrell street, sold for $30,000. 

The Market for Western Addition and Mission property offers 
nothing that is new. It is not the season of the year when the de- 
mand is atits best, and the present Winter has witnessed rather a 
greater scarcity of buyers than is usual. It has been explained that 
the condition of the streets is getting entirely too bad, for it is now 
from 6 to 10 years that any work of moment was done on any street 
in either locality. A three days rain converts the so-called macadam 
into mud, and the streets become impassable. Why the owner of a 
handsome house will grudge the expense of putting the street in front 
of his property in order when at the same time he readily spends a 
couple of hundred dollars for patent sidewalks, is inexplainable. It 
must be because he considers the sidewalk his " own," while the street 
belongs to the whole public. 

Among recent Western Addition sales may be mentioned 34x127:8 
on the north side of Pacific street, 137:6 feet east of Polk; 180x186:3 
on the west side of Ashbury, 266 feet south of Frederick; 26x89:7 on 
the north side of California street, 78:3 feet west of Webster, $8,000; 
84x137:6 on the north side of Pacific, 137:6 east of Gough street; 136 
xl55 on the south side of Hayes street, 100 feet east of Van Ness; 
49:8x137:6 on the southeast corner of Washington and Franklin, and 
40x132:7 on the south side of Pacific street, 179:9 east of Webster. 



The Christmas number of ' ' Freund's Music and Drama ' ' was a 
well edited and excellently illustrated publication, and reflects the 
highest credit on all who were engaged in getting it out. 

People who see sermons iu everything know that the snowou the ground 
warns us that the -sole should be well cared for, and, likewise, that gentle- 
men who wish to he well dressed should get their clothes made by J. W 
Carmany, No. 25 Kearny street. 



FILLMORE TRACT 



The FILLMORE TRACT, situated about THREE MILES easterly from 
San Jose, containing 

800 ACRES, 

Has been subdivided, as per map on file in our office, in tracts of from 7 
to 40 Acres, and placed in our hands * 

FOR SALE1 

Prices range from $100 per acre and upwards, according to location. 

TERMS— 25 per cent. Cash: 25 per cent, additional within 60 days, and 
the remainder on or before two years, at 8 per cent, per annum. 

MONTGOMERY, REA & CO., 

(INCORPORATED) 

Real Estate Agents, 

Nov. 26. J No. 7 West Santa Clara Street, San Jose. 

STEAM BOILER INCRUSTATIONS. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

Llewellyn Filter-Heater and Condenser! 

(Over 300 in Daily Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering tne Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 
Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 
330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. [Sept. 11. 

_ GITY~STABLESr 

A. de la ROZA, ..... Proprietor. 

SUCCESSOR TO TOM C. BARRY, 
S A. 1ST J OSjB , C A. L . 

The First-Class Stable of the Garden City. 

Your Livery and Hack Custom Politely Solicited. 
THE BOARDING OF HORSES A SPECIALTY. 
PLEASE CALI,.-n 



SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal, 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 

PIAUOS. [Oct. 8. 



IsT O TI O IE. 

San Fbancisco, January I, 1888. 
Mr. Richard Delafield has this day retired from 
our house in San Francisco and New York, and 
-will hereafter act for us and sign as our attorney 
in New York; and Messrs. Delafield, Morgan, 
Kissell & Co. will represent us in the Eastern 
portion of the United States and Canada. Mr. 
Thomas B. MeGovern will sign for us as attorney 
in Chicago. 
Jan. 7. WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 

E. L. 6. STEELE & CO., 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW 4 CO.), 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

8AN FRANCISCO. 

—AGENTS— 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery. 

HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 
Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 
Counterfeits and Imitations. 
41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. April 17. 

Of moat delicate flavor, and ths 
only true Champagne produced in 



Eclipse Extra Dry! 



the United States, 



Jan. II, 1888. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



I" 



_ 



OBITUARY 
Mr T. F. O'Coimor. In the death ol thii gtnUeruui. which w;^ 

:iltln'>t tragic Hi Its silddelim tj hllH Ins! ,t lhi'lll] 

member, the Bupreme Bench, of which he wu Beoretary, a faithful 
and competent aaaUtant, and bis famih "i busband and father, 

Mr. O'Connor waa thtrty-aeven years ot age and a native ol Maasa- 
chuaelta, though be came (<• tlii> State when very roans. He waa 
essentially a sell made man. having been, so to ipeafc, " discovered " 
by Chtef-JusUce Wallace while occupying the position of bell-boy at 
toe Lick House, Subsequently he studied law, waa admitted to the 
bar, and became theJusi iry and Librarian. A memory 

irbfch waa phenominally retentive, in addition to being very ready, fa 
said t" have made him particularly useful in the position he occupied. 

Dr. J. J. F. Haine — All old Californians will learn with regret 
that this gentleman died at bia home in Anvera. France, on the 8th 
ol laal month. The deceased came i>> California in the Pioneer 
days, and enaged m the practice of bis profession as ■ physician, He 
vru a gentleman of vulture, refinement and marked scientific ability, 
and naturally he soon secured a Leading place among his professional 
brethren, as well as in the esteem of tin- laiety— a position, by the 
way. which lie continued to hold until he retired from active practice, 
and returned to Iti^ home In Prance. The deceased was born in 
Anvera in 1800, and consequently had reached the ripe old age ol aev- 
enty-eight at the time of nis death. A widow and several children 
survive him. 

Mr. Warren Williams.— The death of this well-known gentleman 
took place at bia aister'a residence in Fresno on the 6th hist. The deceas- 
ed gentleman's home was in IVrtland, Or., where he has been for many 
years past the leading architect. A short time ago, however, be took 
a trip Bast, and on his way back he was taken sick and obliged to 
lay over at Fresno, where ne subsequently died. The deceased waa 
a SOD Of Mr. Willi. mis, an architect who was formerly well known in 
San Francisco, and who designed the Merchant's Exchange, the 
Wells, Fargo boOding.and many other prominent structures. He 
left a widow and six children, who are well provided for. 

General W. Sea well.— On the 8th instant this old soldier passed on 
to answer roll call on that further shore where friend and foe are 
bivouacked together beneath the trees which line the banks of the 
eternal river. The dead General was horn in Virginia, and was the 
last surviving member of the class which graduated from West Point 
in the year L§25. He served with distinction in the Seminole war in 
Florida, where he was promoted to the rank of Major. In the Mexi- 
can war he gained a Lieutenant-Colonelcy, and in the civil war, un- 
like most of the officers from Ins .-state, he stayed by the old flag and 
rose to be a Brigadier-Oeneral. 

Mr. Francis Blake. —This well-known member of the San Fran- 
Cisco business community died suddenly, of heart disease, while out 
driving, near his home, in Alameda County, on Saturday evening 
last. The deceased was born in Portland, Maine, nine and sixty 
years ago, and came to this coast " when the water came up to Mont- 
gomery strett." After spending a short time at the mines, he re- 
turned' to this city and engaged in the printing trade in partnership 
with Mr. Moffitt. The firm's business was subsequently developed 
into that which is now conducted by Messrs. Blake, Moffitt & Towne. 
The deceased left a widow and two daughters. 

Mr. Antoine Chabot.— After a long and useful career this well- 
known citizen passed over to join the "innumerable caravan " on 
the 6th inst. at the home of his brother in Oakland. The deceased 
Originated the water systems which now supply Oakland, San Jose 
and Vallejo; besides, he was, at the time"of his death. President 
of the Contra Costa Water Company. The deceased was a liberal, 
broad-minded, energetic citizen, and held a high place in the estima- 
tion of his neighbors and friends. 

Ex-Judge A. C. Call.— This gentleman died at the home of bis 
brother, in this city, on Saturday last. The deceased was quite 

Erominent in public'and business affairs in the State of Iowa, where 
is home was. He was in the confidence of the management of the 
Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company, and in all the opera- 
tions of that corporation west of the Mississippi River his judgment 
was largely relied upon. The deceased was visiting California for his 
health. 

Capt. W. W. Neal.— This gentleman passed over the bar which 
separates the known from the unknown worlds this week, and by his 
death the pilot service of this port has lost its oldest and one of its 
most efficient members. The deceased was born in Nantucket, Mass., 
six and sixty years ago, and was commissioned as pilot for this port 
in 1851. The deceased was a member of the Pioneers and of the 
Freemasons, and was highly respected by all who knew him. He left 
two sons. 

Mr. W. H. Keith.— This old and respected citizen of San Francisco 
fell into that sleep which knows no awakening on last Saturday .after 
an illness of several weeks. The deceased gentleman was born in 
Boston one and sixty years ago, and came to this coast while still a 
young man. He was engaged in the drug business during his active 
life, and enjoyed the esteem and confidence of all with whom he came 
in contact. A widow and several children survive him. 

Mr. C. W. Beach.— On last Saturday this gentleman breathed his 
last at Monrovia, in Los Angeles County. The deceased was former- 
ly a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, and was con- 
nected with the Knights Templar and the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. He possessed the esteem of a large circle of friends, and the 
news of his death brought out expressions of regret on all sides. 

If you desire to cultivate those talents with which nature has en- 
dowed you, go to Mrs. Julia Melville-Snyder, No. 138 McAllister 
street. The American stage fairly bristles with successful actors and 
actresses who have received their dramatic or lyric culture at the 
hands of this lady. In fact, it would seem as though Mrs. Melville 
Snyder's lessons were a sure talisman to success. 

D. Albert Hilleb, M. D., 1011 Sutter street, Saa Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Compin,. 

Loottlon ol principal pure ..( I>u i i ai 

Uonolwoi Sivaila. 

..■I. lli.il nl n 
twenty ninth 

poration, payahle [mm, ■.Hut. 

nttln-.ith i tti anam .'wada Block, No sou M 

street, Ban Fra rata. 

Any stock upon wll 1 ..u 

Monday, the sixth (6) day ol February. 1888, will be delinquent. 
Ami advertlaod toi sale al public audio 

rill be sold on Tl ESDAV. the twenty-eighth [a da) ol February, 
18*8, to pay the delinquent ii--i--ni.ni, toKcllier with I Ivorlln- 

log and expense* ol sale. By order ol the Board ol Dl 

_ iikniiy in \-. Beoretary. 

levada lil.n-1., .'. treot, Bau Fr« 

Calif ornia. |,, , 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location ol principal place of bustne 3*p Pranelaco, Callfornli 
Uonof Works— Virginia City, Ston 

Notice i- hereby Ktveu that al a meeting nj the Board ol Directors, held 
"ii the iSthdaj of December, 1887, au oancssment (No. 8) ol twenty-fli 
per share, waa levied upou the capital corooratlou, payable 

Immediately, lo rrnited States gold coin, to the Secretary, al ti 

the Compauy Boom £", Nevada Mock, No. 800 Montgomery 
Francisco, California. 

Auy stock upou which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Seventeenth Day of January, 1888, wilt be delinquent. 
And advertised for Mile al public auction; and nnleae paymenl U mi 
fore, will he Mild onFKIDAY, the third day ol February, 1888, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising ami expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

A. II. BOSH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 2:1 Nevada Block, No. 300 Montgoinerv street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. [Bee. )7. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works — Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Hoard of Directors, held 
on the 16th day of December, 1887, au assessment (No. ;:.. ol PI ttj (501 iJenta 
per share was levied upon the capital stock ol the corporation, payable im- 
mediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the Office ol the 
Company, room E>2, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, .Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-fourth Day of January, 1888, will be Delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment Is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the sixteenth day of February'. 1888, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DEAS. Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. fDec. 17. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Silver Star Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting ol the Board of Directors, held on 
the 12th day of December, 1887, an assessment (No. l) of Twenty-five '"cuts 
(25c.) per share waa levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the Office of the 
Compauy, Room 69, Nevada Block, No. 30j Montgomery street, Sau Fraucis- 
co, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remaiu unpaid on 
The Sixteenth Day of January, 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction; nud unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the eighth day of February, HS88, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising tind ex- 
penses of saie. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ALFRED K DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room No. <<9, Nevada Block, No. SOU Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. [Dec 17. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold'Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Fourth day of January, 1888, an assessment (No. 48) ol Fifty Cents 
(50c ) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United Slates u"ld coin, to the Secretary at the ollice of the 
Compauy, Room 3, No. 329 Fine street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upou which this assessment shall remaiu unpaid on 
The 8th day ol February. 1888. will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction : and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the Twenty-ninth day of February, 1888, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
exnensesof sale. By order of the Board ol Directors. 

e p james NEWLAND3, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Stock Exchange Building, No. 329 Fine street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. [Jan. 7. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Assessment ■• £' 

Amount per Share T «.. SSiS 

LBviod January .|th, 1888 

Delinquent in Office .. • ••■ February 'it: 1888 

Day or sale of Delinquent Stock £ .^^^M^a^m 

Office- Koom 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. l Jau - '■ 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



MANHATTAN MUSINGS. 

It sometimes seems to me extraordinary that Californians in New 
York do not reclaim the Battery. The greatest imaginable hardship 
for a San Franciscan is to find himself deprived or the view of the 
bay and its beautiful islands — a sight that, on calm days, is sooth- 
ing, and which brings, in stormy weather, a sense of exhilaration. 
I had once a little friend in New York, who found that by standing 
on her window-sill she could just get a glimpse of the masts of some 
ships lying at anchor, and who, to her great discomfort and peril, 
would spend at intervals two or three hours a day, clinging, in pre- 
carious fashion, to her window frame. The breeziness and sense of 
space which enchant one in San Francisco are lost here, where a view 
ot streets and people is considered the climax of an agreeable outlook. 

But in spite of all they may say, it is rare that Californians find 
themselves at home in New York. The Californian Colony here sug- 
gests the American Colony in Paris — it is always a segregated quan- 
tity. There are many Californian families settled here, but their as- 
sociations are those brought them from the West. Judge Belden's 
family, with his married daughters, the D. 0. Mills, Mrs. Alexander 
(nee Crocker), the Lents, Shaws, Halls and others call this place their 
home, yet they are all of New York — not in it. In the city California 
men are amongst the most popular in Wall street. Eugene Dewey 
is the idol of his circle, and no man is more popular in the clubs. 
But the man remembered with enthusiasm by the brokers is Way- 
man Budd— now in Chicago — and who was in San Francisco the most 
popular man on the street. I can never hear Budd's name without 
thinking of one of the bttises he committed several years ago. It is 
of course well known that to the gentler sex he was irresistible. Well, 
as the story-tellers say, one certain maiden became deeply enamored 
of the fickle Wayman. Her first name was Ketmah. This is not 
fiction. Her heart yearned over him, and hopelessly she sought a 
means of giving him pleasure. A man whose very name was con- 
nected with luxury, whose apartment was no doubt filled with superb 
gifts from his friends, what might she offer him? At last the long- 
sought opportunity came. She heard him express a liking for cus- 
tard pie. The next day, to the indecorous and ill-restrained delight 
of the assembled brukers, a huge package of custard pies arrived for 
Wayman from the amoureuse Ketmah. Budd was not in the least 
disconcerted, but carried them off to Bradley & Rulofson, then the 
leading photographers, and had them photographed in great style. 

There is one Californian here who has, of late, disappeared from 
his usual haunts, and that is Harry Dam, who, ever since the unhappy 
connection of his name with the pardon frauds, has not been seen 
amongst men. No one can find him. His work is done in seclusion, 
and his face shines no more in the thoroughfares of New York. I 
heard a pleasing story of him. When he first came to New York he 
was asked by a friendly New York man what clubs he would like to 
be put up at. "O, really, dear fellow," he answered, "I shall not 
seek any clubs. I sball wait until they seek me." He is still pa- 
tiently waiting, but the clubs do not seem to be seeking. 

That very clever and industrious little lady, Mrs. Unger, is once 
more in the city in a lofty flat in West Fifteenth street. One of the 
chief adornments of her apartment is a charming portrait of her 
little daughter Gladys, painted by Goodman, who is said to be Bou- 
guereau's favorite pupil. The little girl is represented in Japanese 
dress, and is deliciously quaint and picturesque. Goodman having, 
like many artists, fallen into impecuniosity, is at present working at 
the Grand Opera House on scenery for the new Broadway theatre. 

Mrs, Langtry has been playing at the Grand Opera, and some cf 
its employees have disclosed the secret of her great popularity with 
the theatre, from the manager to the call boy. She is unusually gen- 
erous. She makes constant presents to the ladies of her company, 
to the stage manager, to the acting manager, to the scenic artist, and 
tips the workmen liberally. On Xmas day she gave all the smaller 
employees four dollars each, and the chief* ones— managers and the 
like— valuable gifts. She has just been made an honorary member 
of the Actor's Fund Society, to whom she gives an elaborate benefit 
every year. She has given prize cups to the chrysanthemum shows 
and the kennel shows, and she is therefore popular with their pa- 
trons. And in all this she keeps herself entirely in the background, 
and is personally unknown to nearly all those who receive her bene- 
factions. 

The Ladds, Castles, Millers, Clovers, Stanfords, Mrs. Grattan, Mrs. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. S. G. Murphy, Mrs. George Raum, Mrs. Charles 
Toland, Mrs. Philip Lilienthal, Mrs. J. B. Haggin, Mrs. S. W. Pease, 
Mrs. J. B. Stokes, Leonard Chenery, Captain and Mrs. Morgan Tay- 
lor, Colonel Schuyler Crosby, and ma/iy others well known in San 
Francisco, are amongst the familiar faces one sees of late in New 
York. I sometimes wonder why this city is so fascinating, for it is 
very provincial. Men and women brought up here imagine that no 
place exists outside of New York — that there is no civilization except 
on this narrow island. We cosmopolitan San Franciscans are far 
broader in our ideas and institutions. New York is very suspicious 
of all Western product, and regards Californians in much the same 
light as it would regard a wild-cat stock. 

The brokers are not the whole-hearted, jovial set that we are fa- 
miliar with on California street, but a very narrow and borne" lot of 
men. People are never tired, it must be said, of talking of the one 
man who made the brightness of the street while he lived — William 
R. Travers. Many stones of him have traveled Westward, but here 
are a few which perhaps may not yet have grown commonplace: 
Henry Clews, the broker, is a very nouveau sort of person, whose 
bald head may distinguish him in a crowded room. He once ap- 
pealed to Travers, concerning his intention of going to a ball in cos- 
tume, and asked Traver's advice about a dress. "D — dress?" said 
Travers; " why— why don't you sugar — c— c— coat your head— and 
g— go as a pill ! " Another time Clews referred to himself proudly as 
a self-made man, wben Travers blandly inquired why, if he was self- 
made, had he not put some hair on his head. Apropos of this, Fred- 
erick Luce, tbe artist, demanded what was the meaning of a self- 
made man. Was it one whom the Creator had nothing to do with ? 

When the electric lights were first placed in Park Row some one 
called the attention of Uncle Billy Travers to the event. "They 
ought to sh— shine well," he said; " they're so— so near the B— bat- 



tery." No man has yet taken Mr. Traver's place in the clubs. Prob- 
ably no one ever can. 

It seems rather a strange thing to hear that Remenyi, the violinist, 
whom every one supposed had reached a better and brighter world, 
is indeed alive. He has been a wonderfully powerful musician— pow- 
erful in the sense of his marvelous magnetism. He was always a pe- 
culiar man, and quite indifferent to social customs. On one occa- 
sion, when playing in Canada, he was told by the citizens of the town 
that he was to be tbe recipient of a beautiful gift at his first concert. 
The moment having arrived, a screen was drawn from one side of the 
stage, and disclosed stood a life-size portrait of Remenyi himself. 
He wept with delight and enthusiasm. In the hotels he had a way 
of hailing friends or acquaintances across the dining-hall — in a way 
unrivaled even by the Australian tourist. Joseffy, so popular with 
us , has given up playing almost entirely , and devotes himself to com- 
position. He is making name and fortune. 

We have two Western men here whose future is assured in the 
dramatic profession — Clay Greene and Archie Gunther. Their names 
are enough to insure the success of any play. Of artists, Julian Rue 
is the most patient and hardworking of our friends. He has a studio 
in Trenton, and is successful in his work. William Bradford and E. 
Wood Perrj r still work together and make a fair showing amongst 
prosperous artists. 

Amongst old-time journalists is the redoubtable Stephen Massett, 
who is apparently 
"One of those great, those glorious ones, who was not born to die." 

Mr. Verdenal is another transferred San Franciscan. He has been 
very ill of late, and unable to leave his room, but he has had great 
care and attention from his pretty little wife. Would that all men 
were so lucky. Ate. 

New York, January 1, 1888. 

Silver Furniture ! 

Never before shown in this market. Chadbourne's, 741, 743 and 745 

Market street. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Agents for Growers and Manufacturers, 

Charterers of Vessels for All Trades, 

Agents for the Mexican Phosphate and Sulphur Co.'s 
Products, 

And General Insurance Agents, 
Have correspondents in the chief Cities of the United States, Eu- 
rope, Australia, India, China and principal Islands of the Pacific, 
and attend to the Purchase of Goods and the Sale of California 
Products in those Countries. [Jan. 22- 

Wm. T. Coleman & Co., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



SAN FRANC/SCO AND NEW YORK. 



Chicago: 

91 MICMCAJ AVESUE, 

T. B. McGOVERN, 

Agent. 

New York City, 
71 Hudson Street. 



—AGENCIES— 
London: 

4 Bishopsgate St. Within, 

Eugene E. Jones, 

Agent. 

Liverpool, 
54 Drury Buildings. 



Astoria: 

FlavePs Wharf* Warehouse, 

Jno. F. McGovebn, 

Agent. 

Los Angeles, 

75 North Spring St. 



We have our Brokers in every commercial city of importance in the West- 
ern, Middle and Eastern States, and employ a large staff of traveling sales- 
men. We have the best facilities for the distribution of California Products 
East, and give especial attention to 

Canned Goods, Raisins, Wines and Brandies, 
Borax, Barley, Canned Salmon, 

Salmon in Barrels, Mustard Seed, 

Dried Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, 
Lima and Small White Beans and Other Products. 
" [Feb. 26.1 



H. B Williams. 



A. Chesebeough. 



W. H. DlMOND 



WILLIAMS, DlMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of 
Clippers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line," 

FHinQP Fvtra ?ir\i\ Sold at price o£ Im P orted Cham " 

LUlUbC LAlId LMV (pagnes, less duty. 



.1 .i, 14, ' 



s.\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



NOTABIL1A. 



A tall Missourian tailed at the dUtrid Bohool and, eyeing the 
sternly, said: " My boy, Henry, tell a me you whipped aim 
rening.* " Yea." assented the teacher, edging toward Efce door, 
'•but be deserved it, I assure you." "Ami he says you used a rawhide 
onhitu?" " Yea, sir, bat "And you slapped bun with roar 

band* u well ? " " 1 did, but l assure you "Assure nothin'. 

Lei nn- r4t« you a pointer. When you hive to punish that boy, use 
a olub; li»- doesn't oare ■ darn ior rawhides." 

■wka State Journal. 

An exchange has an article beaded " How to Hake a Japanese 
Kan." t 'in- l'«>o.i way would be t«. dress the Japanese in a buffalo robe, 
pat a mustard plaster on his scalp ami then stand him over the 
register. If that doesn'l Caose him I" i.iii you had belter five up try- 
ing la make him. but don'l on that account forget to advise all tour- 
ists who are sojourning in8an Francisco to gel their meals at the 
< Original " 8 wain 'a Bakery/' No. 213 Sutter street' 

Bare is an actual oase of a person who tither did not clearly un- 
derstand the meaning of the word " I'olitcnesa^ or else considered 
well-bred behavior an undesirable accomplishment. He was and is 
yel an officer of the city government in Kew York, and was stop- 
ping in Saratoga daring the Bummer. " When you come to the city 
• ■all on mi-," be said; "I'd lik<- to introduce you to my wit'.' and 
children, ami have you make a good visit at my home. You'll find 
no blamed politeness there." * —Harper's Bator. 

Maud: How many Christmas presents did you get, Clara? Clara : 
Fifteen. And you? Maud: I got the promise of a husband. Clara: 
oh. you mean Charley Nickleplate. I was once engaged to him my- 
self, you know. Maud: Yes, SO he told me, and that lie threw you 
over Tor me, * * * They don't speah now as they pass by on their 
way to*', a. Haled Co.s great Dry -Goods Emporium, Nos. it 11 , L42 
and 1 1 1 South First street, San Jose. 

"The Binghamton Republican" says that an American para- 

fpaphist having written this weak jokelet, "Notwithstanding that a 
ady should always bequietand self-contained, she cannot even enter 
a place of worship without a tremendous bustle," a French news- 
pa per reproduced it in this form : "According to an American author 
the ladies of that country are so greedy of notoriety that they cannot 
enter the holy sanctuary without disturbing the kneeling worshipers 
with their vulgar and unseemly ado." 

No true Democrat cares a copper whether Shakspeare wrote his 
work-- «»r hired Huron to click 'em off on a type-writer. The great 
question is. How big a majority arc we going to roil up next year? 
'Flu- time approaches when every man must put on his war-paint and 
whoop ; meanwhile, White, No. 614 Commercial street, keeps on sell- 
ing beautiful Silk Hats. 

"Come, young man, you're running this into the ground," as the 
grocer remarked when he found that the new clerk had got the whole 
coffee mixed with the coffee in the next bin which had been run 
through the mill. —Boston Transcript. 

Poison-oak cured bv Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately 
after returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will 
be prevented. James G. Steele & Co.. 635 Market street- 
According to an old superstition of the Mediaeval Church, when- 
ever a cock crows a lie is being told. The reason that cocks crow so 
persistency in the early morning hours is because the morning papers 
are being set up. 

When you've dirty carpets that ought to be beat, 
Just send for S. Ferguson, 10 on Tenth street; 
His work is prompt, and good and neat. 

Judge (to acquitted prisoner)— " Let this be a warning to you to 
avoid evil associates. Take care to keep from bad company in fu- 
ture.'' Prisoner—*' I shall take care, my lord, never to appear before 
you again." 

The man who gets credit at his shoemaker's can hardly say his 
soles his own, but he can get his photograph taken at the Elite Gal- 
lery. 838 Market street, and so obtain a beautiful picture. 

The rubber boot and shoe men have formed a trust, but this will 
not cause rubber boots and shoes to be trusted when they have holes 
in them. — Rochester Post Express. 

Goto Swasey's Photograph. Gallery, Jso. 2(3 Montgomery street, 
opp. Lick House, S. F., for Instantaneous Photographs. Pacific Coast 
Views. Excellent Work. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 

There is a popular impression to the effect that a woman cannot 
keep a secret. Yet, who ever heard a woman say that her new black 
silk was partly made up of the old one? — Puck. 

Fredericksburg Brewing Co. Gold Medal, 1887. First Prize 
Medal 1885 and 1886. 

The man whose step-ladder collapsed when he was hanging his 
father's portrait, bringing the picture down on the top of his head, 
says it is a striking likeness of the old man. — Boston Bulletin. 

H. W. Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, N. E. Cor. Taylor and Turk. 

De Smith— Don't you think Miss Travis is very cold and distant? 
Popinjay— She ought to be ; she has gone to Toronto to spend the 
Winter. — Burlington Free Press. 

Wm, H. Keith & Co., West End Pharmacy, cor. McAllister and Fillmore. 

Mahogany Rockers ! 
Burnished gold trimmings — our original designs. Chadbourne's, 
741, 743 and.745 Market street. 



PACIFIC MUTUAL 

Life Insurance Company of California, 

HOME OFFICE, 418 California Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Accident Insurance, 

I'm am. 'i nt Paid at 

Full Ahoint tor loss of 
two 111 

l-'i i i Am. ii v, [i 

both • 

ONE tiuki> of I'.. Hey f..r 
Hit (hand 
or Foot). 

PAYfl THIRTY WEEKS 
for total disability- 
being POl i- 
more thau allowed by 
other companies. 



ASSETS: 
$1,600,000 00. 

Paid to pollcj holder*, 
vi .N oo. 

■ il K HOLDBM, 

with aggregate wraith 
of 87. o o oho o->,are 
. law for 
the debt* ol the (-orpor 
atinu . mi. i Directum are 
Iblo for acta of 



Life Insurance. 
HOST AI'I'H"\ l D IHN- 
PollClCJ Rr<- Ini 

able. 

arc world-wide. 
nre Plainly 
worded. 
Policies ere Liberal, 
■ . Just 

IMMEDIATE PAYMENT 
liter reeelpl ol proofs 
of lb-nth, In the repattv 
Hon enjoyed by this 
Company. 



OFFJCKBUi 

GEO. A. MOOKE. ,, President 

J. N. PATTON 

ceo. W, BEAVER, Vice President 

SAMUEL M. MARKS Asa'l Secretary 

ALEX. W. BALDWIN, State Agent, 
405 California Street, San Francisco. 



U R.CLUNE88, MI'., M.-d. 'Director 
WM. 0. 60ULD. Actuary 

i UOS BBNNBT Geo oral Blip? 

CHA8. N, POX Attorney 



AMERICAN BISCUIT CO., 

801-815 Battery Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO- 



MANUFACTURE AN UNLIMITED VARIETY OP 
CRACKERS AND FANCY BISCUITS, 

Superior to anything ever offered for sale in the United States. 



Sole Makers of the Celebrated 

"SH"0"WFLAKES." 

Successors to the California cracker CO. 



[Oct. 22. 



C. WOOLRICH, 

Commission and Forwarding Agent, Mazatlan, Mexico. 

Agent for Pacific Mail S. S. Co., Royal Mail S. P. Co., The Marine Insurance 
Co. and Lloyds of London. 

A residence of 34 years on the west coast of Mexico enables me to offer 
useful services and larce experience to Intending investor? and owner,-, of 
properties for the purchase and sales of mines, lauds, etc., in Sinaloa and 
adjoining States. 

Merchandise and machinery forwarded to the interior and all commission 
business transacted with care aud punctuality. [Oct. 15. 

8. L. Jones. E. D. Jones. 

S. L, JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California 8treet. Uanuary 9. 



CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME 8TEEET. 
[Feb. 19.] 

j. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 67, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet First and Second, San Francisco. One Block Irom Palace Hotel. 

rjsr- Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor Montgomery aud Bush. Carriages aud Coupes Kepc at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 158. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 



San Francisco 

Assay Office. 



416 Montgomery Street, : 

Gold and 8ilver Refinery and 
^^"Manufacturers of Bluestoue, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 
The "Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 
Chamber/in Patents. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY. 

No. 310 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
WHOLESALE DEALERS LN FURS. 



80 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL 

U niversal charity and benevolence were 

salient features in the character of the late 
Catholic Primate of Ireland and Archbishop 
of Armagh, Dr. McGettigan. In Ulster, the 
supposed stronghold of religious intolerance, 
the two heads of the Protestant and Catholic 
Churches in Ireland lived side by side in peace 
and friendship. On the occasion of Dr. lie- 
Gettigan's funeral, recently, the Protestant 
Primate and Archbishop of Armagh, Dr. 
Knox, with Dean Chadwick, walked in the 
procession of mourners to the grave, adjacent 
to the burial ground of the poor, where, at his 
dying request, Archbishop McGettigan was 
buried. Most of the leading Protestant gen- 
trv, together with all the Catholic gentry of 
the neighborhood, were also present. A sea- 
sonable example of peace and good -will 
amongst all men ! 

So England is to have still another exile 

on her hands. Arabi is pining his life away, 
where "the spicy breezes blow soft o'er Cey- 
lon's isle." Zobehr, the slave-dealing rebel, is 
fretting his heart out in the shadows of frown- 
ing "Gib." Now Ja Ja, the West African 
monarch, who turned restive under British 
coercion, is to be sent to St. Helena, which 
will henceforth forget Napolean. 

The Emperor of Russia's birthday gift 

to the Empress was an emerald necklace, com- 
posed of forty stones of the same size, which 
have been collected during the last two years 
at a vast expense for this particular purpose. 
The fortieth birthday of the Empress was cele- 
brated on November 27. 

The Court Journal says that it is not 

generally known that Sir Mo'rell Mackenzie is 
the son of the late distinguished and much-re- 
spected actor, Mr. Compton, who was for 
years a member of Mr. Buckstone's company. 
Mr. Compton's name was Mackenzie. 

During the last thirteen years the United 

States has doubled its railroad mileage, while 
in twenty years it tripled theiron roadways of 
18fi7. That record is nothing more than a fair 
evidence of American growth and progress 
generally. 

The disapproval of the Soto-Carazo 

Treaty between Costa Rica and Nicaragua is 
much' regretted in the latter republic, as it is 
generally held that this step will prove dis- 
astrous to work being commenced on the 
Nicaragua Canal. 

A capital suggestion has been made by 

a Volapukatarian, namely, that all English 
poets should, for the future, write their poetry 
in Volapuk so as to give their productions a 
wider renown abroad. 

Definition of a hospital: A place in 

which they put beds, in which they put men, 
in which they put drugs. 



-^bP9C 








j^mMihcoc':^ 


C-^akSK 


m^:P-&f(ov' s M 


V3W 


W^0i$iz-km 


JfeyML 


r TISKK3HJb*I3?'7 


W >' 


K3BHP?^f^5 





ALLCOCK S POROUS PLASTERS act 

safely, promptly and effectually ; do not burn 
or blister, but sootbe and relieve while curing, 

They are the Standard Remedy for Weak 
Back, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, Colds, 
Coughs, Sore Throat, Pulmonary and Kidney 
Difficulties, Malaria, Dyspepsia, Heart, 
Spleen, Liver and Stomach Affections, Strains 
and all Local Pains. 

Beware of imitations, and do not be de- 
ceived by misrepresentations. 

Ask for ALLCOCK'S, and let no explana- 
tion or solicitation induce you to accept a 
substitute. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave, and are Due to Arrive at, 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



LEAVE 

(for) 


From January 1, 1888. 


ARRIVE 

(from) 


8:00 i. 


. .Calistoga and Napa 


10:10a. 












5:40 p. 


3:30 P. 


. . Gait via Martinez 


11:10A. 






12:40 p. 






3:40 p. 


5:30 p. 
*6:O0a. 




8:40 p. 




•8:10 A. 


12:00 m. 






8:00 a. 


- .lone via Livermore 


5:40 P. 


4:00 p. 


..Knight's Lauding 


10:10 A. 


*4;30 p. 


.Livermore and Pleasanton. . ... 


•8:40 A. 


7:30 a. 


. L'sAogrs.Deraing.ElPasoAEast 


6:40 F. 


3:30 p. 


..Los Angeles and Mojave 


11:10 a. 


•13:30 p. 


..Milton 


•5:40 p. 


7:00 a. 




8:10 a. 






10:40 a. 


8:00 a. 


-Red Bluff via Marysville 


5:40 p. 


8:00 a. 


. Redding via Willows 


6:10 p. 


7:00 a. 


. .Sacramento via Beuicia 


8:10 a. 


8:00 a. 


" via Beuicia 


6:10 p. 


8:00 a. 


" via Livermore. . .. 


5:40 p. 


.5:00 p. 


" via Beuicia 


10:40 a. 


4:00 p. 


" via Benicia 


10:10 a. 


6:30 p. 


" via Beuicia 


7:40 a. 


"1:00 p. 


. . 8acrameuto River Steamers — 


*6:O0a. 


8:00 a. 




•3:40 p. 


{10:30 a. 


" 


J3:40p. 


12:00 m. 




8:40 p. 


3:30 p. 




9:40 A. 


*4:30p. 


" 




3:30 p. 




11:10 a. 


8:00 a. 


. .Stockton via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


3:30 p. 


" via Martinez 


11 :10 A. 


6:30 p. 


..Siskiyou and Portland 


7:40 a. 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. -{-Saturdays excepted. 

{Sundays only. 

c— Take ferry train and change cars at East Oak- 
land. 



Standard Time furnished by LICK OBSERVA- 
TORY. 



A. N. TOWNE, 
Geu. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
From "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 

To EAST OAKLAND— »6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To 23o AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— Same as " To 
East Oakland " until 6:00 p. m., inclusive, also 
at 7:00, 8:00 and 10:00 P. M. 

To FRUIT VALE— »6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 
3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— "9:30, »2:00, 6:30, 
12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— «6:00, «6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, »8:30, 
9:00, 9:30, 10:00, {10:30, 11:00, {11:30, 12:00, (12:30, 
1:00, (1:30, 2:00, {2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00,5:30 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To BERKELEY— *6:00,»6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, *8-30, 
9:00, 9:30, 10:00, {10:30, 11:00, {11:30, 12:00, {12:30, 
1:00,11:30,2:00,(2:30,3:00, 3:30,4:00,4:30, 5:00, 530, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— Same as " To Berkeley." 



To "SAH FRANCISCO," Daily. 

From FRUIT VALE— 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 8:50, 9:20, 
•10:19, *2:49, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 8:50, 
10:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *o:21, 5:51, 
(9:15, *2:38, "3:15. 

From 23d AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND-6:55, 7-25 
7:55, 8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25, 10:55, 11:25, 11:55. 
12:25, 12:55, 1:25, 1:55, 2:25, 2:55. 3:25, 3:55, 425 
4 :55, 5 .25, 5 :55, 6 :25, 6 :55, 7 :55, 8 :55, 10 :53. 

From EAST OAKLAND— *5:30, 6:00,6:30, 7:00. 7-30 
8:00,8:30,9:00,9:30,10:00,10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 500 
5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland— 7 minutes later 
than from East Oakland. 

FROM ALAMEDA— *5:25, 5:55, *6:25, 6:55, *7:25, 7-55 
•8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, {10:25, 10:55, (11:25, 11-55 
(12:25,12:55, (1:25, 1:55, (2:2.3, 2:55,3:25, 3:55,4-25 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 

FROM BERKELEY— *5:25, 5:55, *6:25, 6:55, »7-25 
7:55, »8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, (10:25,10:55, (11:25,11-55 
(12:25, 12:55, (1:25, 1:55, [2:25, 2:55, 3:23, 3 : :5, 4-25 
4:55, 5:25, 5:56, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 

From WEST BERKELEY— Same as "From Ber- 
keley." 



Creek Route. 
:iSC0-*7:15,9: 

From OAKLAND— *6 :15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 



From SAN FRANCISCO— *7 :15, 9 :15, 11 :15, 1:15, 3 15 
5:15. 



♦Sundays excepted. 



( Sundays only. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. 

South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 

Passenger Trains Leave Station Foot of Market 
Street, South Side, at: 

A'ClCl A - M - (SUNDAYS ONLY) — Hunters' 
*-x.kjkj Train to SAN josE, stopping at all 
way stations — returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 7:20 P. M. 

8'-\ C3 a. m. daily— For Alvarado, Newark, Cen- 
• X<LJ treville, Alviso, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, 
Los Gatos, Wright's, Gleuwood, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Big Trees, SANTA CRUZ and all way sta- 
tions. 

O'tCS p. m. (except Sunday), Express— Mt. 
^j.xcj Eden, Alvarado, Newark, Centerville, 
Alviso, Agnew's, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, New 
Almaden, Los Gatos, and all stations to SANTA 
CRUZ and Boulder Creek. 

A .-| C3 p. m. daily— For SAN JOSE, Los Gatos 
^ • ±ZJ and intermediate points. 
Cte EXCURSIONS to SANTA CRUZ and 
K P C -' BOULDER CREEK, on SATURDAYS and 
SUNDAYS, to return on MONDAY, inclusive. 

$1.75 to SANTA CLARA and SAN JOSE and re- 
turn. Sundays only. 

LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 

From San Francisco to Oakland and Alameda, 

Daily: 

$6:15— $6:45— $7:15— 7:45— 8:15 — 8:45 — 9:15— 9:45— 
10:15—10:45—11:15—11:45 a. k.— 12:15— 12:45— 1:15— 
1:45—2:15—2:45—3:15—3:45—4:15—4:45—5:15—5:45 — 
6:15— 6:45— 7:30— 8:30— 9:30— 10:30— 11:30 P. M. 

To San Francisco, Daily: 
From FOURTEENTH and FRANKLIN Streets, 
OAKLAND : $5:45— $6:15— $6:45— 7:15— 7:45— 8:15— 
8:45-9:15-9:45-10:15- 10:45-11:15^11:45 A.M. 12:15 - 
12 :45— 1 :15— 1 :45— 2 :15— 2 :45— 3 :15— 3 :45— 4 :15— 4 :45— 
5 :15-5 :45-6 :15— 6 :45— 7 :30-8 :30-9 :30-10 :30--ll :30 P.M. 
To San Francisco, Daily: 
From HIGH STREET, ALAMEDA— $5:31— $6:01— 
$6 :31-7 ;01-7 :31~8 :01-8 :31— 9 :01— 9 :31— 10 :01— 10 :31- 
11:01—11:31 A.M. 12:01—12:31 — 1:01—1:31—2:01— 
2 :31— 3 :01— 3 :31— S :01— 4 :31— 5 ;01— 5 :31— 6 :01— 6 :31— 
7:16—8:16—9:16—10:16—11:16 P. M. 
$Sundays excepted. 

Ticket Offices, 613 MARKET STREET, under 
Grand Hotel, and Rotunda Baldwin Hotel, San 
Francisco. 
L. FILLMORE, W. T. FITZGERALD, 

Superintendent. G. F. and P. Agt. 

S. P. C. R'y Div. S. P. C. R'y Div. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 2 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. —1888.— From San Francisco. 

(Touching at Honolulu). 

Oceanic Wednesday, Jan. 11, 1888 

Gaelic Wednesday, Feb. l, " 

Belgic Tuesday, Feb. 21, " 

San Pablo Tuesday, Mar. 13, " 

Oceanic Tuesday, April 3, " 

Gaelic Saturday, April 21, " 

Belgic Saturday. May 12, " 

San Pablo.. Saturday, June 2, " 

Oceanic Thursday, June 21, " 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street, Union Block, San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 

G. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. ["Jan. 7. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Folsom 
street, 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Magnificent 3,000-ton L-on Steamer 

Mariposa Friday, January 13th, at 4 p. m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Honolulu: 
S. S. Australia (3,000 tons) January 31, 1888 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. _ 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS& BROS., 
Jan. 14.1 General Agents. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



SAN FRANUSi'n NEWS I.KTTKK 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

TheUs«*of Water at M ions dif- 

fer U i" thfj cilfi t or tin- free Inge 
WatST at meal time, but the view most 

til) received la probably thai it dilutee the 
gastric Juice and M retards digestion. Apart 
From the fact thai :t moderate delay in the 
i- by ii" means s disadvantage, ;>- sir 
William Roberts bas shown in his explanation 
ol tin- popularity ol tea and coffee, ft i> more 
than doubtful whether any such eff< 
reality produced. When ingested during 
meals, water may do good by washing out the 
digested food anil by exposing the undigested 
part more thoroughly to the action ol the di- 
gestive Ferments. Pepsin is ■ catalyptic body, 

and a given quantity will work almost indeii- 
nttely provided the peptones sre removed as 
they are formed. The good effects of water, 
drunk freely before meals, bas, however, an- 
other heneticial result— it Washes away ihe 
n i mous which is secreted by the mucomj 
membrane during the intervals of repose, and 
favors peristalsis of the whole alimentary 
tract. The membrane thus cleansed is in a 
much better condition to receive food and con- 
vert it into soluble compounds. The accumu- 
lation of mUCOUS is specially well marked in the 
morning, when the gastric walls are covered 
with a thick, tenacious layer. Food entering 
the stomach at this lime will become covered 
with this tenacious covering, which for a time 

protects ii from the action of thegastric f err 

ments, and so retards digestion. The tubular 
contracted Stomach, with its puckered mucous 
lining and viscid contents, a normal condition 
in the morning before breakfast, is not suitable 
to receive food. Exercise before partaking of 
a meal stimulates the circulation of the blood 
and facilitates the How of blood through the 
vessels. A glass of water washes out the mu- 
cous, partially distends thestomach, wakes up 
peristalsis, and prepares the alimentary canal 
for the morning meal. Observation has shown 
that non - irritating liquids pass directly 
through the " tubular" stomach, and even if 
food be present they only mix with it to a 
slight extent. According to Dr. Leuf, who 
has made this subject a special study, cold 
water should be given to persons who have 
sufficient vitality to react and hot water to the 
others. In chronic gastric catarrh it is ex- 
tremely beneficial to drink warm or hot water 
before meals, and salt is said in most cases to 
add to the good effect produced. 

— Iir.'tish Medical Journal. 

— A Chinese paper says : There is a log of 
yellow color standing just outside of Ch'i Hua 
Gate of Peking, where it has been since the 
fall of the Ming dynasty, commanding the re- 
spect of all classes of people. It is in perfect 
condition. The insects have not made any 
raid upon it as they do on other logs. The 
ne >ple believe that the log must be the resi- 
dence of some god, so they annually worship 
it. On the 1st of October the Emperor com- 
manded the Board of Ceremonies to appoint a 
few officials to pay respects to the deified log. 



MOUNT VERNON CO., BALTIMORE. 

CuT* The undersigned having been appointed 
AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST for the sale 
of the manufactures of above company, have now 
in store: 

Sail Duck— all Numbers; 
Hydraulie— all Numbers; 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete As- 
sortment of All Qualities 28J^-Inch DUCK, from 
7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy None but the Genuine— A Specific for Ex- 
hausted Vitality, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces, 
etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California 
and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 
Market street, (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. 
Box of 50 pills, ?1 25; of 100 pills. $2; of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6. Preparatory Pills,?2. 

Send for Circular. 



SURE CURE DISCOVERED FOR 

CATARRII 
Lauderbach's German Catarrh Remedy. a. Jt 

rricell. Samples free at DrucgiBts. MailedforlOc. instam[ic 
T1IOCSANDSCCHBD lince the discovery of this method of 




TIME SC H E D U LE. 
P&Menger Trains lenvo and arrive at I'aaseni 
Depot (Tmvii.>t'ini It, 1'i't ::•! and ttli Itrac 
maolaoo: 



s. r. 



IN KFFKCT JAN. 1, 1888. 
Cemetery and San Mateo ; I 2:80 p 



AKK1VK 

*. r. 



t7:00i 

»:«a 
10:30 a. 

4:80 P 

•5:10 P 

6:30 P 

111:4') p 



in :K0 
•:< ::.i 
4:30 

10:80 

" S:30 

•8:80 



• San Mate^ Redwood 
..aud Menlo Park . . . 



a.K 



.. in >. 
•8:00 a. 

:mi:: v. 
10:02 a. 
+3:30 p. 

4:36 p. 

ti.tOp. 

(7:80 p. 

9:08 a. 

. I 1*10:02 v. 

. . | 4:36 p. 

J I 0:40 p. 

Almaden and Way Sta tio ns )■ 4:86 p. 

Gilroy. l'ajuro.'CastrovUle.j |*10:02A. 
Sail uas and Monterey ..) I 6:40 p. 



.Santa Clara. Ball Jn.se and 
...Principal Way Stations 



8:30 A. I 
s :S0 > . I 

•3:30 p. | 



.Ilollister aud Tres Piuos. . 



+6:40 p. 



Watsouville, Aptos, Soquel ) |*10:02a. 
. .(Capitola) and SautaCruz.j | 6:40p. 



8:30 a. 



( Soledad, Pa.so Robles, » I 
<Templeton (San Luis Oblspo)> 6:40 p. 
' aud Way Stations . . . . J | 

A.— Morning. p.— Afteruoon. 

•Sundays excepted. + Sundays ouly. I Theatre 
Train Saturdays ouly. 
Trains run on Pacific Standard Time. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 8:30 
i. M. Train. 



Nearly all rail line to SAN LUIS OBISPO. Ouly 
24 miles statiiuK hetweeu Templetou aud San Luis 
Obispo. Time from Sau Fraucisco, 12 hours. 

Through rate, $8.50. 



SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.— At Reduced 
Rates — to Gilroy Springs and Paraiso Spriugs. 



Excursion Tickets. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— Round Trip Tickets to the 

famous Lick Observatory (Mt. Hamilton), cau be 

obtained at any of the Company's Ticket Ofhces 

in Sau Francisco. Rate— 15.50. 

ForSnndava nnlv l So,d SUNDAY MORNING; good 

For Sundays only, | for Keturn same da 

sw Satnrdav f Sold Saturday aud Sunday 

Sunaav audi on 'y ; « ooi for Retllrn uutil fo '- 
M«»Z, I lowing Monday, inclusive, at 
Monday. l^the iollnwingrates: 



Rouud Trip <.,.„ Satto | Rouud Trip Qlln Sal to 

from Sau Suf Mon from San 2',!, | Mou 

Francisco to Tkt. iFrancisco to I Tkt. 



San Bruno ..18.... 8 50 

Millbrae 1 65 

Oak Grove.. | 90 

San Mateo. . . 751 1 10 

Belmont 1 1 00, 1 25 

Red wood.... I 1 001 1 40 



Fair Oaks. . . I 1 25 
Menlo Park.; 1 25 
MaySeld. . . 1 25 
Mount'D V'w 81 50 



1 50 
1 60 
1 75 
82 00 



(Lawrences . . 
iSanta Clara.. 
Sau Jose. . .. 

Gilroy 

iHollister ... 

I Aptos.. 

Loma Prieta. 
ISoquel... .. 
ISanta Cruz. . 
iMonterey... . 



1 50 2 25 

1 75 

1 75 

2 7.'. 



4 00 

4 50 

5 00 



5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES.— Passenger Depot, Townsend 
Street; Valencia-street Station, No. 613 Market St., 
Grand Hotel and Rotunda, Baldwin Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt Ag't 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: THE STEAM- 
ERS UMATILLA AND MEXICO— 

FOR VICTORIA, B. C, AND PUGET SOUND 
PORTS— 9 A. M. every Friday. 

The steamer MEXICO, sailing every other Fri- 
day, connects at Port Townsend with Steamers 
IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO. : Every five days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hue- 
neme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, A. M. 

For EUREKA. ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay: CITY OF CHESTER, Every Tuesday 
at 9 o'clock A. m. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, ETC.: Ev- 
ery Monday, at 3 p. M. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents 

Sept. 17.] No. 10 Market street. 



lA/r\l">l/ >' OB AM- »50 A WEEK aud 

Wl IKK expenses paid. Outfit worth $5 and 
i 'I Villi particulars free. P.O. Vichery, 

I Augusta, Me. [Oct. 15. 



THE DONAHUE BROAD GAUGE ROUTE. 
com Ml NCLNQ BUNTJAY, DBCBMDEB l. 1x87, and 
until further uotloe, BoaU and lr;..i 
leave from him arnvt- at sun Franolaoo Pai 
BCUgcr Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, an 
followa: 



Lkavb S. F. 



S& k o 



DiamtATioN. 



7:1.. V. M. H;O0A. M. 
3:30 P.M. [5:00P.M. 
5:00 p.m. 



Petaloma 

and 
Banta Rosa, 



Arrive is 9. i 



■ ImJ'v 



IU.HI i.M 
6:10 P. M 



10:30 A. M 
6 :U. f . p. M . 



I I FliUoii 

1 Wiutlhor, 
7:45 a. m.|6:00a. m.| Healdabnrg. 
3:30p. m. Cloverdale <v 

| Way BtatlOQB. 



in BO ..M 



7 :■!:. a. m. 8:00 a. m.| G ucrnc vllle. U:10p. m. f»:05p. m 
iia .:. connect hi SuiiIh lin.-ii for WImI.' .Sulphur 

Springs. Sebaatopol and Murk West Spriaga; at 
Clairvilii.- fur Skagga Bprlaga, and at Cloverdale 
for Highland Siiriiu:s, Keweyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Spriugs, Hluc Lake*, Burtlett 
Springs, 1/kiah, Vichy Spriugs, Navarro Ridge, 
Me ndoci no City and the Geysers. 

EXcrKSioiv TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
ilays— To Petaluma, $1 75; to Santa Kosa, $3; to 
Healdsuurtf, $4: to (Moverdale, $5. 

EXCUUSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, |1 50; to Santa Kosa, $2; to Ilealds- 
bur g, |3; to Cl overda le, $4 5 0; to Gueruevllle, |3. 

From Shu Fratn'Uco to Point Tiburon ami Sun 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:15 a. m.,'J:15 a. M., 11:30 a.m., 
3:30 p.m., 5.00 p. m.,6;15 p. m.; Suudays: 8:00 a. m., 
9:30 a. M-, 11:00 A. M.. 1:30 P. M., 5:00 p. M. 

To Sau Fraucisco from Sau Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20 a. m., 8:00 a. M.,y : 30 a. m., 12 45 p. U., 8:40 p. m., 
5:05 P. M.; Suudays: 8:10 a. M., 9:40 a. m., 12:15 p. m., 
3::»p. M., 5:00 P. M. 

To 9an Fraucisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50 a. m., 8:25 a. m., 9:55 a. m., 1:10 p. M., 
4:05 p. m., 5:33 p. m.; Sundays: 8:40 a. m., 10:05 a. m., 
12:40 P. M., 3:55 p. m., 5:30 p. M. 



H. C. WHITING, 

Superintendent. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Geu. Pass, aud Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves San Fran- 
cisco aud Connects with Trains at SONOMA 
LANDING as follows: 

4.AA p. m., Daily (Sunday excepted), from 
.\J\J WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF, for 
the Towu of Sonoma, Glen Elleu aud Way Poiuts. 
Keturuiug, arrives in Sau Francisco at 9:00 a. m. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8.-IO a. m. (Sundays only), from WASHING- 
.±CJ TON-STREET WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Gleu Ellen aud Way Poiuts. Return- 
ing, arrives iu San Fraucisco at i»:00 p. M. Round- 
Trip Tickets t o Sonoma, $1; Glen Ellen, |1 50. 



. C. WHITING, 

Superintendent. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

_ TICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 

For New York via Panama, 

S. S. Acapulco Saturday, Jau. 14th, at 4 p. M. 

S. S. Colima Wednesday, Jau 25th, at 10 a. m. 

For Ports of Call See Guide. 

Passengers booked through to aud from Europe 
by any Hue. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City op Rio de Janeiro Saturday, Jan. 21, 2 p. m. 
City of New York Saturday, Feb. 11, 2 p. m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and returu at 
reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First aud Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H. Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 14. 



— The official report sent in states. that 
there are 17,000 unemployed in London, repre- 
senting 30,000 men, women and children. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



.MOTD TEVIS. President, San Francisco, 
jw 1. j, valentine. vice-president 

and Gen, Manager, San Francisco. 
JAMES HERON. Seoretary, San Francisco. 
H. B. PARSONS. AssT. SBCY. NEW YORK. 
H. WADSWORTH. TREASURER. San FRANCISCO. 

office ofthe 
Vice-Pres't and Gen- l Manager. 






ymu$$ mm mmmm 



San- eFtavvcisco, tyvccwikvz 31, 1887. 



Dear Sir : The following is a cop3' of our Annual Statement of precious Metals produced in the States and 
Territories west of the Missouri River (including British Columbia, and receipts by express from the West Coast States 
of Mexico) during 1SS7, which shows aggregate products as follows : Gold, $33,074,022 ; Silver, $51,578,118; Copper, 
$10,362,746; Lead, $9,631,073. Total gross result, $104,645,959. 

As stated repeatedly, the facilities afforded for the transportation of bullion, ores, and base metals, by the exten- 
sion of railroads into mining districts, increase the difficulty of verifying the reports of the products from several 
important localities, especially is this the case in the reports from Colorado and Montana ; and the general tendency 
is to exaggeration when the actual values are not obtainable from authentic sources ; but the aggregate result as 
shown herein, we think may be relied on with reasonable confidence as approximately correct. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by other 
Conveyances. 


Silver Bullion 
by Express. 


Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight. 


TOTAL. 




$10,760,052 

2,590,962 

650,000 

130,000 

559.°°° 

1,940,000 

4,400,000 

13,910 

4,900,000 

i47,Soo 

680,545 

2,385,320 

17,801 

556,154 


$1,076,905 


$ 972,707 
5,355,647 


$ 853,259 
2,285,844 


$13,662,923 
10,232,453 




300,000 

30,000 

50,000 

200,000 

200,000 


950,000 
160,000 












609,000 

S, 240,000 

25,483,275 
7,637,73° 

23,293,000 

4,229,234 

5,771,55° 
3,058,605 

762, -35 
556,154 


Utah 


2,800,000 

10,783,275 

2,049,090 

6,480,000 

279,434 
1,073,985 

473, 2S5 
744,234 


3,300,000 
10,100,000 

5,574,730 
11,913,000 

3,752,000 

3,817,020 








50.000 
200,000 
200,000 


Arizona 




















Total 


$29,731,544 


$2,306,905 


$31,011,657 


$41,595,853 


$104,645,959 



The gross yield for 1S87, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 3i T V 5 33,074,022, 

Silver 49-nre ■■• 51,578,118 

Copper 9^ 10,362,746 

Lead 9Trnr 9,631,073 

Total 104,645,959 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPTER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1887. 



YEAR. 


Production as 
per W. F. & Co's State- 
ments, including: 
amounts from British 
Columbia and West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclusive of 
British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows : 




Lead. 


Copper. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


I87O 
187I 
I872 

IS73 

1874 

1875 

I876 


$54,000,000 
58,2S4,O0O 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
80,889,057 
90.S75.173 
98,421,754 
81,154,622 
75,349,501 
80,167.936 
84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313,612 

84.975.954 

90,181,260 

103,011,761 

104,645,959 


$52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70, 139, S60 
71,965,610 

76.703.433 
87,219,859 
95,811,582 
78,276,167 
72,6S8,8SS 
77,232,512 
81,19s, 474 
89,207,549 
84,639,212 
81,633,835 
87,311,382 
100,160,222 
103,327,770 


$I,o8o,000 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 

4,185,769 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
' 8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 
9,63I,°73 




$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19,924,429 
27,483,3°2 
29,699,122 
31,635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 

37,248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033,055 
42,987,613 

48,I33,°39 
42,975,101 

43,529,925 
44,516,599 
52,136,851 
50,833,884 


$33,750,000 
34,398,000 

38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 
42,886,935 
44,880,223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 

3°,6S3,959 
.29,011,318 
.27,816,640 
-25,183,567 
-26,393,756 
29,561,424 
32,500,067 














1877 




1878 

IS79 

ISSO... . 

l88l 

1882 

1S83 

1SS4... . 

1885 

I8S6 

1SS7 . , . 






$ 898,000 
1,195,000 

4,055,°37 
5,683,921 
6,086,252 
7,838,036 

9,2/6,755 
10,362,746 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows : From 
London, $23,861,805 ; from Marseilles, $4,699,906 ; from Venice. $ ; from San Francisco, $14,444,907. 

Total, $43,006,618, as against $44,034,590 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated at $4.84. 



.Ian. H, 188S. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKR. 



^fiiil^ Stcvfow of ^lUvvu-o. 



STATEMENT OP THE PRODUCT >' I BOLD UfD SILVER IN THE REPUBLIC OP MEXICO Rl CORRBCTBD M I877 TO 18S7. 



VI \KS 


Gold. 


Sii.-. 




I877-1878 


$747,000 

SSl OO 

.000 

1 ...13,000 

,000 

956.000 

1.1.55.000 

914,000 

1,026,000 

1.047,000 


$24,857,000 
25,125,000 
26,800,000 

29,234.000 
29,329,000 

1.000 

31.695,000 

53.226,000 
34, 1 12.0C0 
34,600,000 


"OO 
26,006,000 

-•7.742,000 

.i", -'4 7,000 
30,266,000 
30,525,000 

52,750,000 
54.140,000 
55.138,000 
35, '.47,000 


1S7S-1S79 


I879-I880 


I88O-I88I 


I88I-IS82 


i8S2-iSS^ 


1883-1884 


18S4-1SS5 


1885- 18S6 


1886-1S87 




Total 


$9,518,000 


$298,527,000 


$3oS,045,ooo 





EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OP GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO FROM THE 1ST OK JULY, 1873, 

TO THE 30TII OF Jl'XE, 1SS7. 



YEARS. 


Gold Dollars. 


silver Dollars. 


CorrER Dollars. 


I873-I874 


866,743 
S62,6i9 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 




1874-1S75 


19,386,958 
19,454,054 
21,415,128 
22.0S4.203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 
24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24.0S3.921 

25.377.379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 


21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41.364 
16,300 
M.035 
42,258 
11,972 


1875-1876 


1876-1877 


1877-I878 


1878-1879 


1879-1880 


l880-l88l 


I88l-l882 


l882-l88^ 


1883-1884 




I884-I885 




1S85-1S86 




I886-I8S7 








Total 


8,045,749 


323,883,608 


203,296 





Summary.— Totals : Gold, $8,045,749 ; Silver, $323,883,608 ; Copper, $203,296; Grand Total, $332,132,653. 

!IT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN I537 TO THE END OF THE FISCAL YEAR OF 1887. 



Colonial, Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$ 752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 


$ 760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,329 






342,893 




~i Independence. 

Iturbide's Imperial Bust, from 1822-23 

Republic Eagle— 1824 to 30th June, 1873 . . . 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


S542.893 


$2,151,581,960 


$ 557.392 
45,040,628 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,485 




$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 


$5,235,177 


Republic. 

Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th 
of June, 1887. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


$8,045,749 


$323,883,608 


$203,296 


$332,132,653 



SUMMARY. 
$2,151,581,960; Independence — from 1822 to 1873, 



655,251 ; 



Colonial Epoch — from 1537 to 1821, 
Republic— from 1873 to 1887, $332,132,653. Total, $3,293,369,864. 

The exhibits of production and mintage indicate a steady development of the mining interests of the United 
States of America, and also of Mexico, and with the increasing facilities of railway communication fostering every 
department of. industry, the outlook for a continued growth in the product of precious metals is flattering. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, 

Vice-President & Gen' I Manager Wells, Fargo <Sf Company. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 14, 1888. 



-ARTISTIC HOMES OF CALIFORNIA." 
No. 53. 

RESIDENCE OP Ex-GOVERSOR PERKINS, OAKLAND, CAL. 

Situated in the center of a large square of land on the corner of 
Adeline and Tenth streets, is the residence of ex-Governor Perkins. 
A wide-spreading lawn stretches before the front entrance, and is 
bounded by a well-graveled path— entered from the two front cor- 
ners of the lot. Besides the lawns are the garden, a large barn and 
stable, croquet ground, a poultry yard, venerable oaks and vine-clad 
eucalipti. The house itself, which was built by Dr. R. E. Cole, the 
dentist, is a substantial, square-roomed edifice. Its front porch, with 
balcony supported on columns, leads to the main entrance with its 
doubledoors opening into the square vestibule. The vestibule doors, 
of walnut with ground-glass panels, open into the main hall. On the 
left of the hall are the two parlors, spanned by an arch resting on 
columns. A white marble mantel is at the end of the back parlor. 
One side of this parlor isexpandedinto a spacious bay window. On 
the right of the hall is the library, with white marble mantel and 
well-filled walnut book-cases and its cabinet of mineralogical speci- 
mens. Beyond is the dining-room, communicating with the back 
hall, and butler's pantry, andkitchen. A large window in the west- 
ern wall catches the last rays of the sun. The main staircase of black 
walnut makes several turns and reaches the large square hall of the 
second story, which, as does the hall below, communicates with the 
back hall and stairs. There are seven bed-chambers on this floor, 
besides the bath-room and linen-closets. In the attic are several 
apartments. On the west side of the house is the side entrance 
opening out upon a long covered porch. The rooms are all spacious, 
well lighted, sunny apartments. Throughout the house are scattered 
a profusion of valuable oil paintings by the best artists of the day, 
numerous articles of vertu. In'the halfstands a chiming clock, in a 
tall, carved, oaken case, and the parlor is graced by marble forms of 
statuary. Taste, intelligence and wealth combine to make a home of 
comfort, elegance and convenience. 

A BUSINESS CHANGE. 
The Safe and Scale business carried on by Messrs. W. B. Wil- 
shire & Company in this city for so many years, has developed into 
one of the most extensive commercial enterprises on the Pacific 
Coast; it has grown so extensive, in fact, that in order to facilitate 
the handling of it the firm has been incorporated under the name 
and style of "The Wilshire Safe and Scale .Company." The head 
office and principal depot of the new corporation will remain at 204 
and 20i> California street, and will be under the management of Mr. 
George A. Raymond, who will also exercise a general supervision 
over the business of the various branches of the concern. Of these there 
are at present four— one at Honolulu, under the charge of Mr. C. O. 
Berger ; one at 149 Front street, Portland, under the charge of Mr. A.T. 
Webb; one at 293 North Main street, Los Angeles, under the charge 
of Mr. George A. Johnston, and one at 1324 D street, San Diego, 
under the charge of Messrs. W, H. Holabird & Co. Large stocks of 
the famous Safes and Scales handled by the corporation will be kept 
on hand at the depot of the head office and at each of the branches, 
and the prospects for the company's success could not look brighter. 
The goods it handles are the" best " their kind in the market, and 
that fact is well known to the geneial public, so that a steadily in- 
creasing demand for them must be a natural result. We are pleased 
to welcome this new corporation to the active business ranks of San 
Francisco, and are rejoiced that the outlook for its success is so 
promising. 

EXAMINE THE FIGURES. 
Mr. Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President and General Manager of Wells 
Fargo A Co.'s Express, has issued his annual statement of the precious 
metals produced in the States and Territories west of the Missouri River 
(inclusive of British Columbia and receipts by express from the West 
Coast States of Mexico). The statement, which is tabular in form, 
will be found on pages 22 and 23 of this number of the News Letter. 
Being exact, in every particular, it can be relied upon, and those who 
are interested in the development of the mineral industries of the 
Pacific slope will find it a veritable encyclopaedia of useful informa- 
tion. The gross production for 1887, asshown in detail by the figures 
of the statement, was a value of $104,645 ,0o9. divided as follows: Gold, 
$33,074,022; silver, $51,578,118; copper, $10,302,746; lead, $9,031,073. 
When one pauses for a moment and realizes the vastness of these fig- 
ures, the importance of the industry they represent becomes mani- 
fest, and the reason for the publication of this tabulated mass of fig- 
ures, showing the proportions in which this vast wealth is distributed, 
becomes apparent. In the grouping of these figures Mr. Valentine 
has, as usual, displayed his financial genius. 



The stockholders of the Folding Iron Gate and Guard Company 
held their annual meeting at their office. No. 79 Montgomery street, 
on Monday evening. The following Directors were elected to serve 
for the coming year: Geo. H. Rice, W. R. A.Johnson, J. P. Le 
Count, H. Dutard, W. E. Norwood, Geo. H. Rice was elected Presi- 
dent; W. R. A. Johnson, Vice-President; J. P. Le Count, Secretary 
and Manager. The report of the Secretary was read, and apparently 
was very satisfactory to the stockholders." The indications are that 
this enterprise will obtain considerable prominence in the near 
future. 

The Annual Statement of Wells, Fargo <fc Co.'s Bank has just been 
made public, and it shows that that institution has enjoyed a most 
successful year's business. The figures in detail demonstrate that 
the operations of this great financial institution are directed with care 
and shrewdness, and the volume of business it transacts is indicative 
of a large measure of public confidence. 



During this cold weather nothing could be nicer than a dozen of those 
delicious Blue Point Ovaters, which eau beobtaiued at Moraghan's Parlors, 
Nos. 68 and 69 California Market. 

It is difficult for a sailor to make a tiller of the soil. He eau make it of 
wood, though; and his wife can insure a beautiful complexion by using 
Madame Rachel's Bloom of Youth. 



HOTEL -WIZCsTIDSOIR,, 

(late aemy and navy), 

Victoria Street, London, S. W. 

2so apartments. 

-:e lectbic ligh t: 

T-u-rlsisli and S-wimirLiiigr Ba/Uis. 
Oct. 15.] J. R. CLEAVE, Manager. 



PARAISO SPRINGS! 

MONTEREY COUNTY, CAL., 

TUS C-A-^XjSB-A-X5 OP -A-^rE3K,IO-A. ! 

NEW MANAGEMENT! NEW IMPROVEMENTS! 
The most Beautiful, most Invigorating, most Easy of Access of all Min- 
eral Spring Resorts— 1,500 feet above the sea level. Take San Jose Cars, 
8:30 morning, and arrive at Springs at dinner. 

J. G. FOSTER, Proprietor. 

ED. FOSTER. Asst. Manager. 

•Telegraph, Express and Postoflfices. [Feb. 10. 



ST- Jii.MES HOTEL, 

SAN JOSE, CAL, 
TYLER BEACH, PROPRIETOR. 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all Modern Improvements. The 
rooms are large, airy, and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, 
next door to the Court House. No expense has been spared in making this 
a First-Class Hotel in every respect. 

AMERICAN PLAN. Rates, $2.00 to $2.50 per day. Special Prices by the 
Week or Mouth. Coach and Carriage at Depot on arrival of all Trains. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 
A Quiet House of Peculiar Excellence. 

ARMY AND NAVY HEADQUARTERS. 
Jan. 7.] WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the stockholders of the 
Commonweaith Consolidated Mining Company, a corporation organized 
under and by virtue of the laws of the State of California, has been called 
and will be held at the office of said corporation, 309 Montgomery street, 
room 52, in the City aud County of San Francisco, in said State, on 

Saturday, the 28th day of January, 1888, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M„ 
For the purpose of considering and determining whether or not the action 
of the Board of Directors of said corporation in purchasiug for said cor- 
poration that certain mining claim situated in Tuscarora Mining District, 
County of Elko, State of Nevada, known as the Nina mining claim, shall be 
ratified and approved by said stockholders, and for the purpose of consid- 
ering aud determining whether the action of the Board of Directors of this 
corporation in selling to North Commonwealth Mining Company, a corpora- 
tion organized under the laws of the State of California, all that certain 
mining ground situated in Elko County, State of Nevada, described as 
follows, to wit: 

All those portions of the lands embraced within the limits of Nina and 
All Aloue mining claims, in Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, State 
of Nevada, bounded and described as follows, to wit: Beginning at post 
number three (3) as laid down and designated on the United States Survey 
of lot number forty-six (4t>) in township number forty (40) north, range 
fifty-one (51) east, iilouut Diablo base and meridian, said survey being the 
survey of the ground of the Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company; 
thence ruuuiug according to the true meridian, magnetic variation being 
seventeen aud one-half (T7/'->) degrees' east, north" thirty-one (31) degrees 
fifteen (15) minutes, east eight hundred and twenty-five (825) feet; thence 
south thirty-three (33) degrees thl-rty (30) minutes, east five hundred and 
thirty (530) feet; thence south thirty-one (31) degrees fifteen (15) minutes, 
west six hundred i,60u) feet : thence north fifty-eight (58) degrees forty-five 
(45) minutes, we&t four hundred and fifty-eight (45SJ feet; thence south 
fifty-seven (57) degrees forty-five (45> minutes, west fifty (50) feet; thence 
north thirty-one (31) degrees fifteen (15) minutes, east forty-four (44) feet to 
the p.ace of beginning. 

And in selling to Del Monte Mining Company, a corporation organized 
uuder the laws of the State of California, the following described mining 
ground, to wit: All that certain mining ground situate, lying and being in 
the Tuscarora Mining District r iu the County of Elko. State of Nevada, -and 
described as follows, to wit: All that portion of the laud embraced within 
the limits of the two mining claims in said district known as the Nina and 
Tip-Top claims and locations, lying north aud west of the line drawn 
through post number two (2) and post number three (3), as laid down aud 
designated upon United States survey of lot number forty-six (46) in town- 
ship forty (40) north, range fifty-one (51) east, Mount Diablo base aud meri- 
dian, said survey being the survey of the ground of the Commonwealth 
Consolidated Mining Company, shall be ratified aud confirmed by the said 
stockholders. 

Dated Sau Francisco, January 10,1888. 

By order of the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Consolidated 
Mining Company. [Jan. 14.] HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

A natural product of the Finest 
Grapes of the World. No addition oj 
Brandy. 



Eclipse Extra Dry I 




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DlVOTTD TO THE LeaWNG l*TEHEST8 OP CauTOIWIA AW TMt PACIFIC COAST. 

rp,Ki't:r.i(K Makuiott. 
' Subacrtption, 
. 

ntt-cla*M mnttrr. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1888. 



THE BUSINESS OFFICES of the 8. F. NEWS 
LETTER hare been r>in»rt;l in Market >nul Fourth 8ts. 
Buililimj, where orders for adi nts "ml subscrip- 

ond communications should be ad- 
d. Subscribers not receiving the NEWS LETTER 
regularly n<" confer a favor <m the publisher by notifying 
him. 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



The Directors of the Union Gold Mining Company, Limited, held 
their annual meeting in London the other day. It was very interest- 
ing in more ways khan one. The report of the Chairman was princi- 
pally confined to a statement of the disgraceful condition of affairs 
which led to the late sweeping changes in die management. Baron 
Qranl was conspicuous by. bis absence, and an announcement that 
the titled schemer was detained from attendance tinder medical ad- 
ls the only satisfaction the shareholders received to their de- 
mand for an explanation of his statements at the meeting of the 
company in May last. At that time we criticized the remarks of the 
Baron and his protege', Hamilton, and denounced Lhero as false from 
beginning to end. The shareholders were, however, as usual, swayed 
by t In- persuasive eloquence of their < 'hair man. and advanced the ad- 
ditional fund- he requited. The turn of events later on has, however, 
proved that we were correct.and after a further waste of time and 
money, a change in the management at home and at the mine was 
considered expedient. As for 0. A. Hamilton, his career as mining 
engineer before the London public has been as brief as the experience 
i<n which bis self graduation in the profession was based. When the 
News Li n rut called the attention of English investors, at the incep- 
tion of tin I'nion M'heuie. to the ab>unlity of accepting his report on 
any mine, for the reason that as an expert he was totally devoid of 
technical or even practical knowledge, many doubtless thought the 
attack was made through personal animus. There was none. We 
do not even know the man by Bight. When the old Rathgeb mine 
first appeared on the London market, seeing the name Hamilton 
connected with it, the first impression was that the well-known Corn- 
stock miner had made the report. Considering, however, the high 
reputation of this gentleman, and the pour name given the property 
by competent experts who had examined it previously, it seemed im- 
possible A. ('. Hamilton would lend himself in any way to such a 
scheme. An investigation followed, resulting in tlie discovery that 
the new-fledged expert was none other than one C. A. Hamilton, an 
artist or photographer, who was formerly located in the Phelan 
Building in this city. The scheme was then attacked on every point, 
and the false position of the parties connected therewith was shown 
up in the strongest light, in the hope that the warning might serve to 
prevent an investment which must ultimately result in serious loss. 
The following excerpts from the report of Mr. Heiron, the present 
Chairman of the company, in reference to the reputation Hamilton 
has won after a fair trial, must be conceded as an admission that 
what we have said all along was true in every particular: 
•• Mr. Hamilton was originally introduced to this company, sup- 

Eorted by the highest references, and all those who met him believed 
im to be not only an honest but capable man. * * * But we have, 
unfortunately, reason now to believe that in spite of all his wonderful 
statements his practical experience of mining was of the crudest 
kind, and it is owing to this fact, coupied.with nis repeated and con- 
tinuous neglect of his duty, that most of our troubles have arisen." 
Mr. TJrwick, another shareholder in the mines, pays him another 
compliment. He says: " With regard to Mr. Hamilton I am only a 
recent shareholder in the company, and before I became a sharehold- 
er I asked about. Mr. Hamilton, "and the first man I asked, said: 
' You cannot believe a word he says. Do not go into anything he is 
connected with.' " 

A shareholder named W. C. Harvey made some very sensible sug- 
gestions at the meeting, and his satirical remarks on the non appear- 
ance of Grant were evidently appreciated by those present. He 
asked some very straight questions which could only be answered 
one way— by dodging the issue. The chairman, in congratulating 
the company on the new managers at the mine, vouched for them 
personally in the strongest terms, and made quite a point of the fact 
that they " left their posts and started at a moment's notice (without 
any remuneration) for a journey of some hundreds of miles, paying 
their traveling expenses out of their own pockets " at the call from 
the mine directory. In reply the satirical Harvey remarks: " Then, 
sir, with regard to Manager Hamilton, I fully indorse what you say 
with regard to his ability; but I hope, with regard to Mr. T. A. 
Rickard, you are equally sure of his capabilities as the Baron seemed 
to be of Mr. Hamilton." Mr. 8. Crowder also inquired " why we 
should be more sure with regard to the appointment of Mr. Rickard 
and Mr. Argall than with regard to that of Mr. Hamilton? I no- 
ticed," he continued, "as somewhat of a peculiarity to my mind, 
that those two gentlemen should pack up their carpet-bags, and, at a 
moment's notice and without money, start for the mine. I should 



also lik< (•• know how It i- th. v happened to be out of emploi menl 
at that particular moment? It *eenu rather strange toil men 
should be welting about to tumble into ■ ]obwtU 
most unlikely." These queatioi nother 

from 1 1 i when the llaron would bo able to get out < 

The chairman stated further that in the matter oi Baron 

had been very kind, He I to his cousin 

uncles, and some to his aunts. \n Attempt to adjourn the mi 
until Grant could be raked In persou was OTerruled, and the pro- 
gs closed. 
■ ling tin- new management at the mine, we can only regret 
that a young man who can boast ol such a good record on hi 
into the field of professional labor, should be placed In a position to 
stake his reputation in the future on b property like the Union Gold. 

Mr. EUcard i- fully fitted for the position 1 ccupies, from 

a scientific standpoint, but hi- practical knowledge of California 
mines is limited— extremely so. ins recent report to hut Directors 
he assures them that the Onion mine is on tin- celebrated mother 
lode, and continues in the same to say that it \$ a tn 

vein. This statement is in itself contradictory, as every one who Is 
familiar with the mother lode knows that it is a ledge running from 
20 feet to 100 feet wide, and is not composed of an intersect] 
several small veins. Furthermore, admitting that the mother tode 
does run through Calaveras County, might we ask where is there ]t 
paying mine in any part of the county south of the celebrated Gwinn 
mine? The Chairman of the company seems to lay considerable 
•-ins-, on the gentleman's name, and suggests the possibility of it 
exerting a talismamc influence on the future of the property. Un- 
fortunately, experience in this Bection of the universe has shown that 
a name, even backed by 52- ounce brains, is powerless to make a mine 
out of a hole in the ground. The name of Kicardisnol ven familiar 
out here. We can only recall it in one instance that of the Super- 
intendent who abandoned a mine in Kureka, believing it to be played 
out. which has since paid more dividends than it had ever done un- 
der his management. 

The severe weather at Virginia has had a bad effect on the Corn- 
stock Mining Market. Why it should is not exactly clear, for under 
ordinary circumstances the speculative tendencies 01 our worthy citi- 
zens are seldom regulated by the turns of fortune on the lode. Con- 
solidated Virginia is whipping out bullion by the thousands, yet 
strange to say the shares act in a most contradictory manner. They 
have depreciated lately, and other less important stocks have suffer- 
ed in consequence. The news from Savage, Norcross and Confidence 
continues favorable, and prices have been fairly maintained for the 
week. The future of the market is merely a "matter of conjecture. 
Kvery one is inclined to the belief that a high market is certain in 
the near future. Any kind of a market, with lively fluctuations, 
would suit most people. As a general rule it is safe to copper the 
game the street is playing, but of course one might do this once too 
often. There is no question about, many of the mines looking ex- 
tremelv well, but the disagreeable feature of the situation at present 
is the dissensions which prevail among the powers that be. Without 
union among all these cliques there is little chance for a big market. 

The Tuscarora favorites are beginning to attract attention from a 
class of investors who onlv place their money where a steady and 
regular return is assured. Dividends coming In every month are 
also an especial inducement ,<t others who like to play in a combina- 
tion, with income fluctuations combined. Many months ago, when 
North Belle Isle was selling for 10 cents a share, the NEWS LETTER 
urged its friends to purchase the shares, claiming that it was a divi- 
dend-paying mine in the future. Many followed our advice, and 
their stock is to-day good for over ?S per share, with a dividend nay- 
able shortly of 50 cents per share. We have this stock pegged for 
much higher figures than have yet been quoted, with Nevada* Queen 
coining in a good second, and every probability at next that Com- 
monwealth will head the list before the year ends. There is another 
dark horse in the list of mines under the same control that may yet 
surprise the natives on Pine street. 

In other outside camps, the Mount Diablo, of < 'andelaria, is out of 
debt and will soon be ranked among dividend-payers. The Bod ie 
mines are also looking well. 

Mr. Lloyd, of the Valley Gold, has shaken the dust of California 
from his No. 11 sandals, having set his face towards the rising sun in 
the early part of the week. His temper must have been severely 
tried by his investigations in gravel, and his advice to "his Lon- 
don associates will probably be seasoned with regrets that whole- 
some advice from a disinterested ouarter was spurned at a time when 
the dollars were on the right side of the counter. We now under- 
stand that several bore-holes will be sunk to test portions of the bed 
rock. All the former theories suggested by smart engineers will now 
be abandoned, and the only hope is that sufficient gravel will be 
found within confines of property purchased to pay for drifting. 

The International Company of Mexico is in another snarl. Their 
agents at San Diego have been declared out of the game, and a lively 
civil war is progressing. The owners of the ex-Mission Ste Caterina 
are also up in arms, and propose to defend their rights. The Supreme 
Court of Mexico has decided repeatedly in favor of the protection of 
property rights of aliens, and no fears are entertained as to results. 
Further, as the proviso in the grant to the International, the govern- 
ment distinctly provides that no land shall be considered conveyed 
to the prejudice of those parties presenting better right. It would 
seem fitting that the company should settle all questions of title be- 
fore they proceed with an indiscriminate sale of lands to innocent 

The send-off Mr. Hamilton has received in London from the 
Union Gold people will probably give parties who contemplate in- 
vesting in the Mulatos property a higher opinion of his report, on 
which the property is being offered by promoter Lloyd, and also 
strengthen his position with the Boston parties, who are figuring on 
another little game in Calaveras County. 

The Candelaria mill is running twenty-five stamps full time on ore 
from the Georgene mine. This mine is improving as work of devel- 
opment proceeds, and is producing the usual amount of ore. 

Mr Robert Y. Symon left New York on the Gth instant, for Lon- 
don, on business connected with the new Mexican Railroad scheme 
of McWood and other parties in this city. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



"Friend after friend departs: who hath not lost a friend?" 
And the mourners go about the streets clad in habiliments of 
woe. In all countries and among all people, custom has decreed that 
the inward grief shall express itself in sombre garb, and since the depths 
of affliction could never be calm enough to weigh and consider matters 
of dress, fashion has assumed as its own province the right to pre- 
scribe what should be worn by those who have suffered bereavement. 
For mourning, as in all other questions of clothes, there are cer- 
tain set rules which are followed with more or less exactness. Cli- 
mate and individual taste exert a modifying effect even upon the 
most stringent code. For instance, while crape is and always has 
been the deepest mourning possible, vet in San Francisco it is no 
longer worn with its former universality. The ever-to-be-expected 
fog, the prevalence of sand and dust, have been proved by frequent 
experience to ruin the most expensive crape with apalling celerity. 
Above all, mourning should never look shabby, rusty or cheap. 
There is no economy in buying low priced black goods. The gar- 
ment that fades from the darkness of night to a foxy brown is an 
abomination to the one who wears it, and not less so to those whose 
eyes it meets. Of late there has been an effort to introduce fancy 
mourning goods into the San Francisco market, but as yet they have 
not been received with favor. A rich and elegant new material is 
the sanglier, an all-wool fabric with a twill figure and the appearance 
of a woolen crape. But at present the materials most used for deep 
mourning are the drap <V alma, Henrietta cloth and bombazine. 

In the Fast few years there has been a decided movement in this 
city toward the adoption of the richest and most beautiful materials 
for this purpose. For widows, the style has been, and still is, plain 
almost to the degree of severity. A stout, plump figure should be 
robed in a princesse dress; slender forms require more elaboration 
of detail. The collars are worn very high in the neck, and must be 
lined with a projecting edge of a double fold of crape, or of crepe lis. 
The buttons, if crape be used upon the garment, must be covered 
with crape. In spite of the adverse climatic considerations, there are 
those who cannot conceive of mourning without crape. Such will not 
be content to wear the bonnet of nun's vailing, trimmed with narrow 
pleated folds, either rising to a point or curving with the shape of the 
crown, with a puffing of the same round the front, and lined with a 
widow's cap, with or without the white tucked strings. But this is 
the fashion of the day, and in place of the heavy crape vail appears 
that of fine nun's vailing or or grenadine, which is to be so draped 
from the bonnet that it will fall in graceful shawl-like folds over the 
shoulders and down the back. It is a matter of taste as to whether 
the vail shall extend nearly to the ground or be draped from the mid- 
dle, thus falling in double folds. The latest form is the latter, though 
tall figures naturally prefer the other. As to gloves, while both 
dressed and undressed kids may be worn, the preference is for a 
black kid withont stitching. The outer garment or wrap for a widow 
may be of black ottoman cloth, dolman shape, with long front, short 
back, and trimmed with deep black /rise fringe or bands of feather 
tape. Or an elegant effect may be obtained in matalasse cloth, or in 
the rich frisr cloth. It is imperative that for deep mourning all the 
materials shall be lusterless, even to the bonnet pins. The widow 
must wear her deep mourning for a } r ear; a daughter, six months. 
For the latter, during this period, there are many beautiful soft ma- 
terials—fine cashmeres, cloths without brilliancy, fine foulU. and 
camel's hair. The hat may be either a black straw or felt, trimmed 
with wide cashmere ribbon, plain edge, or with silk. Fris/i ribbons 
are also used. When a widow enters upon the second year, her demi- 
mourning will consist of light materials — that is, fancy black goods, 
trimmed with mourning silks, those lusterless fabrics, such as the 
grain de poudre, dull faille, Sicilian and veloutine silks. Plush and 
velvet may not be worn at all in mourning, even as trimming. 

The entire garment may be made of these lusterless black silks and 
be appropriate. The first approach to color will be made with violet. 
A young girl may at last relieve the somberness of her attire by white 
at the neck, or she may appear in white trimmed with black ribbon 
bows, or in violet, covered with black lace. A dinner dress for a young 
lady's second mourning will be very stylish if made of white camel's 
hair and trimmed with black fur. For an elderly lady in second mourn- 
ing there is no more suitable outer garment than a long one of heavily 
corded Sicilian silk, decidedly plain, double breasted, pipings of plain 
silk on the rolling collar and "sleeves ; a double pleat in the back, finish- 
ed with handsome ornaments of gimp, and lined with quilted Mar- 
celine silk. There are exquisite visiles, a small garment suggest- 
ive of the dolman, and tight-fitting jackets with tailor finish for 
young ladies who have laid aside their deep black. 

As crape, in many instances, has been abandoned for the nun's 
vailing, so it has been supplanted on gentlemen's hats by the band 
Of cloth. Perhaps another reason for the non use of crape, aside 
from the perishable nature of the fabric, is to be found in the decided 
aversion which nearly every man has for it. More than one widow 
has been obliged to modify some of her dressmaker's suggestions 
with a protest against too somber and gloomy a garment; and has 
been impelled to do so out of respect to her late husband's oft-ex- 
pressed wish that black should never be worn for him. But what to 
a thoughtful mind seems a violation of all the proprieties is the great 
number of persons in the deepest mourning at places of amusement. 
It always occasions remark, and is suggestive of sham grief. 

. Di Veenon. . 

Lieutenant Mansfield, an army officer visiting this coast on leave 
of absence, was found to have taken the smallpox, and immediately 
had himself driven in a hack from his hotel to the Presidio, where 
he was at once taken in and cared for. A cook, nurse and other at- 
tendants were detailed to wait upon him, and at last accounts he was 
doing as well as might be expected under the circumstances. It is 
good to be an army officer. But it was neither thoughtful nor con- 
siderate of the brave Lieutenant to seek to save himself a little per- 
sonal inconvenience at the risk of carrying the dread disease into the 
crowded barracks of the Presidio. 



A COLD DEAL, 

Or, to be more explicit, a deal of cold. For some time past San 
i raneisco has been freezing to death in an endeavor to keep warm 
The weather has been such that even the oldest inhabitant, that most 
wise and ubiquitous of men, cannot remember the like. Chilblains 
and frosted noses have run riot, and when sheets are like frozen 
glass, who can be blamed for sleeping " between blankets?" And 
yet the thermometer has not gone below zero. " Yes but really one 
feels the cold more here than it is ever felt in the East." Very hkelv 
for there, in the land of ice and snow, of blizzards and cvcloiies tbe 
poor, wretched inhabitants are frozen stiff in the beginning of the 
season, and are too numb and dead to all sensation to feel the 
cold at all. Wasn't a poor fellow pinioned fast by the broken 
timbers of a railroad train that was wrecked one" cold night? 
Didn t a rescuer, hours afterwards, try to extricate him, only 
to fall backward with the victim's hand still in his grasp— after 
it had broken short off at the wrist, frozen clear through? It 
is cold m San Francisco, but not quite so cold as that. Faucets have 
frozen, the hot-water boiler has refused to run; but as yet no small 
boy has met the fate which overtook a youth who did not live in Cal- 
ifornia. He was rather wild, stayed out all night, was caught in the 
rain, then, while he was drenched through and through, it became 
so cold that he was frozen stiff. His father found him the next 
morning at the gate, shouldered the rigid form with the intention of 
thawing him out gradually, when, direful to relate, the old man 
stumbled, the young stiff pitched over his head and struck the stone 
doorstep, breaking into a thousand little brittle pieces which thev 
swept up into the dust-pan. We have not come to that yet There- 
fore let us be thankful, and continue to laud our glorious climate 
even though we can't keep warm. 

On Thursday last the horses attached to car No. 10 of the North 
Beach and Mission Railroad became unmanageable and tore down 
Broadway street at a speed which was perilously rapid. But for the 
presence of mind and personal courage of the driver and conductor a 
serious accident would doubtless have been the result of the break- 
away, and the company is to be congratulated upon having in its 
employ two such reliable men. 6 

D. Albert Hillee. M. D., 1011 Sutter street, San Francisco, California. 



Reductions in Prices ! 

We respectfully announce AN ENORMOUS REDUCTION in PRICES 
tnroughout our Entire Stock, and invite our Customers to call and see the 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS OFFERING. 



SILKS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


PLAIN VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


FANCY VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


DRESS GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


BLACK GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


HOSIERY 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


GLOVES 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 


HOUSE-KEEPING GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES. 



AND- 

Ladies' Muslin 



Underwear 



REDUCED PRICES. 

Packages delivered, carriage paid, in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 




111, 113, 118, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET, 

AND 

lO, 12, 14, 18, 18, 20 MORTON STREET. 

MRS. DARLING, DRESSMAKER, 

Having: lately secured the services of a well-known French draper, in 
comunctiou with the best of cutters and fitters, is prepared to make 
Street, Evening or Stage Dresses, at short notice. 

No. 37 FIFTH ST., SAN Francisco, Cal. fj an . 7. 



Jan. 21, 188S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOCIETY. 



Numerous have been the argument* thta week regarding the 
wt ither. but tilt old forty-niners agree thai the recent cold snap has 
been the longest and moai severe that Ban Prancisco has known 
within their memory, and heart; art- the thanka ottered that fur the 
pre-.. nt anyhow It has come to an end. My predtotiona of bdosj were 
ed In a slight degree on Monde) night, hut when we contrast 
oar brief snow-fall with the accounts reaching us of the blinards 
and storms east of the Rockies, how it sinks into otter Insignificance, 
ety it;i- been tolerably active tin- week In spite. of the cold 
weather and two ••( the coldest days of the season. Friday and Sat- 
urday last witnessed large gatherings at the afternoon teas of Mrs, 

Stetson and Mrs. Goad. Mrs. Stetson's entertainment was in ho ■ 

of bergoeel Mrs. Lefavor, and the rooms were made beautiful with 
■ wealth of floral garniture that, considering the Erostlnesa of the 
outside air, was truly remarkable. The attendance at both houses 
was large, mnsic and the light chit-chat of the day tilling in the time 
most agreeably. At Mrs. Goad's refreshments were served by the 
young ladies. Monday evening society turned out in large numbers 
to welcome Carleton and his opera Company at the Baldwin. On 
Thursday evening a good audience assembled at the Grand Opera 
House to see the play of fiichlieti performed by a company of ama- 
teurs f..r the joint benefit of the Advent Chorch and the Woman's 
Hospital; lust evening was Ladles' Night at the Olympic Club; the 
fourth of the Bachelor Club's series of germans was danced at B'nal 
B'litfa Hall; and the Hermann Brandt Quartette gave their concert 
at Irving Hall. Miss Hamlin's Illustrated Lectures have been very 
fashionably attended, also. 

The event of the week was the fancy dress ball given by Mrs. Willie 
Howard on Wednesday night, and over which excitement and curi- 
osity has been at fever neat ever since she broached the idea of giving 
it. This unusual interest was no doubt largely due to the novelty of 
i\ bul co.sittmt, and to the whispers filling the air anent the magnili- 
cence of the favors to be bestowed in the german, the piece de reeist- 
ance of the evening. The result proved a most brilliant one, and Mrs. 
Howard may be congratulated upon what was decidedly the success 
of the season. The entire house was thrown open and devoted to the 
entertainment, each room, hallway and staircase being profusely 
decorated with ferns and foliage, tulle and ribbons of varied hue, 
Hags, colored balls, birds, butterflies, and conceits of all kinds, mak- 
ing a roup >r,,, 7 at once bewildering and beautiful. Exclamations of 
admiration resounded on nit sides as the guests entered the rooms 
where Mr. and Mrs. Howard, costumed respectively as Queen Eliza- 
beth and Sir Walter Raleigh, stood waiting to receive them. The ball 
Opened with one of the four character dances— that arranged by Mrs. 
Howard — in which the characters of shepherds and shepherdesses 
were taken by the Misses Susie Tompkins, Nellie Smedburg. Fanny 
Elliott and Nellie Corbett. and Messrs. Lucas, Lake, Alfred Reding- 
ton and Brooke Jones. After which pastoral dance and general walk 
around came the gavotte arranged by Mrs. W. B. Collier, and danced 
by eight couples costumed in the dress of the Directoire period. They 
were Misses Cheeseman, Otis, McPherson, Carolan, Taylor, Bland- 
ing. and Mesdames Collier and Coleman, having as partners Messrs. 
Harry Tevis, Mott, Sheldon, Carter Tevis, Smith, Greenaway, New- 
hall and Collier. The interest of this dance was high ten ed by the 
addition of two little people— Master Howard and Miss Collier— who 
preceded the dancers as they made their appearance. The third of 
the series was a quadrille of characters taken from the different 
sports, and represented by Mesdames Harry May. William Taylor, 
Girvin, Pinckard, Misses Linie Ashe, Belle and Lucy Brookes and 
Daisy Casserly.i their partners being Messrs. Casserly, Eyre, Cole- 
man, De Kuyter, McAllister, Kittle, Doyle and Boardman. The 
minuet de la cour was the fourth, and was danced by Army officers in 
uniform, who had for their partners eight young ladies costumed as 
the muses— Misses Millie and Bettie Ashe, Minnie Corbett, Dora 
Boardman and Wallace, and Mesdames Kobinson, Louis Parrott and 
Heathcote. 

After supper, which was served in the second story, came the long 
talked of german, led by Mr. Gardiner Hammond, of Boston, cos- 
tumed as Figaro, with Miss Babette Howard as his partner. Sixty 
couples participated, and several of the figures were new and original. 
The favors were distributed by Mrs. Haync and Miss Flora Low, who 
were seated in a perfect bower of ferns and flowers in the main hall. 
They comprised the usual pretty trifles given as souvenirs of such 
occasions, with one or two costly affairs, such as scarf pins for the 

fentleruen and bracelets for the ladies, those for the last '• flower 
gure " being leghorn hats full of violets for the ladies, and bouton- 
mers for the gentlemen. Altogether the evening was a charming one 
from beginning to end, the night being far spent before adieux were 
said. 

But three weeks more before Lent, and into that time what an 
amount of gay doings is to be crowded ! Already nearly every night 
has its engagement, and even the days are not to be neglected. Af- 
ternoon teas have been very popular this season, and one or two that 
I have been at were rather pleasant. But turning day into night was 
never much to my taste, and one must admit that there is an incon- 

fruity about them as they are now managed not altogether pleasing. 
o leave the bright sunshine and be suddenly ushered into gas-light- 
ed rooms, there to find the hostess and her assistants attired in full 
ball dress while her guests mostly appear in walking costume, even 
sealskins and other furs not being conspicuous by their absence, is 
rather trying to the best-regulated nerves, It is not altogether my 
idea of wnat a " tea " should be, but then perhaps I may be difficult 
to please. The chief dancing event of next week will be the second 
of the Assembly parties on Wednesday evening at Pioneer Hall. 
Henry Heyman's concert on Friday night will be a society affair, of 
course, as will also be Mme. Pyk's testimonial concert on the Mon- 
day night following, so many of our society leaders having taken it 
in hand to make it so, and the list of lady patronesses is quite a form- 
idable one. Mr. Hugo Mansfeldt will also give a musical recital 
next Tuesday evening at Irving Hall. 
February is to be full to repletion of good things, commencing from 



the very st. ir t, as on the cvenitu 
people's party takes place. Mi 

■ or _ t,H - •"''■ I and Mr-. Shi i danc. ., xt mi 

order will be Mrs. TeviV ball on the seventh, In honor oi her sister 
Mrs. Armeden, who will be remembered by all old Califomi 
Miss Laura Sanders, and who. wl Ui hor daughter, Miss pearl Voor 
htes. is here at present from Kentucky. Among other events to 
follow u are the balls of Mrs. Hnggin, Mrs. Coleman, Mrs. Goad and 
Mrs. Gwin, and the last of the Bachelor's cotillons, and the gayest 
season known here for many years, will finish up with the Hani 
ranoy dress i i; ,n ;it the Art a--, iation rooms, for which the manager* 
are making great preparations. Whether the germ Hi nil 

Hall will be a fancy dress one, as sn en, but 

there seems to be a good deal of opposition to the idea, especially 
among tin- men. 

Miss Sybil Sanderson's friends are quite elated over the news of 
her reeent musical success in Paris. It is very gratifying, no doubt, 
but I tear it will result in inducing other young ladies p. leave private 
life, with the hope of shining upon tin- stage. I say fear, for when- 
one succeeds, how many fail. 

Several of our youngladies are enjoying themselves greatly in the 
East from all accounts. Miss Alice Decker in New York, Mis 
Van Ness and Miss Alice Griffith in Baltimore, where they are both 
visiting friends; Mr. A Mrs. George Ladd are in Washington ; Mrs. 
Crocker and her son George visiting Mrs. Alexander in New York, 
in which city at last accounts were Mr. and Mrs. Joe Redding, who, 
however, will return here in a couple of weeks now ; Mrs. Sam Mayer 
is back at home again, as well a- Senator Fair, who arrived on W ed 
nesday last: Mrs Kittle has both her>iarried daughters. Mrs. Taylor 
and Mrs. Heathcote, with her at present; Miss Susie Tompkins of 
San Rafael is spending a few weeks with her grandmother. Mrs. Hart ; 
the Menlo-Park Adamses are in possession of their new home on 
Franklin street, and the Harry Mays are said to have changed their 
base from Dr. Hasting's house on Sutter street to Bob Hastings 1 on 
Jackson street, where they are to spend the rest of the winter. 

Felix. 

A GREAT SALE. 
Messrs. Easton, Eldridge & Co. announce that they will offer for 
sale by public auction on next Tuesday, at their salesrooms, No. 618 
Market street, at noontime, some thirty-eight choice residence 1. its 
fronting on Oak, Page, Cole and Shrader streets, and in the immedi- 
ate neighborhood of the Golden (late Park. The whole of this proper' 
ty is embraced in Western Addition block No. 891. The Height and 
Hayes street cable cars run right to this property, and afford ae per- 
fect transportation facilities as could be Wished. The terms of tin- 
sale are: one half cash, balance in one and two years, with interest at 
seven per cent. An abstract will be furnished to the day of sale, and 
the California Title Insurance and Trust Company stands ready bo 
insure the title which is guaranteed to be perfect. The streets sur- 
rounding the property are all graded, and the lots are ready for build- 
ing. The property is one which is sure to appreciate largely in value in 
the immediate future. It is a well-verified fact that in Eastern cities 
the most radical advance in real property values takes place in the 
neighborhood of the public parks, and San Francisco will not bean 
exception. 

It turns out that the jubilation over the supposed triumph of the 
law in the matter of the Chinese female slaves was altogether pre- 
mature. The majority of them were not, as reported, sent back, but 
are here yet, and have been since the 3d of October last. Thirty- 
seven of them are awaiting a decision of the Circuit Court on a tech- 
nical point, and are meanwhile plying their calling in the dens of 
Chinatown. Is it not about time that somebody realized that pa- 
tience has ceased to be a virtue in regard to the "proceedings of the 
United States Courts? 



There is bad news from Mexico for the Ensenada boomers and 
for the many mining and grazing companies located in Mexican 
border States. Public opinion in Mexico insists that the Government 
shall enforce the law forbidding foreigners to aojuire real property 
in that country within twenty leagues of the boundry. There are not 
a few wealthy Californians who will feel like kicking against that 
law. But then our own Congress has declared that non-resident 
foreigners shall not own landed estate anywhere in this country. 

For artistic Japanese Goods go to G. T. Marsh & Co., under the Palace. 



'JZ/^WV??^' 




'^sheets' 






if- 



Pi^ 0^- ^ $4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21. 1888. 



HOW COUNSELOR CLARKE "WAS HONORED. 
Counselor Clarke, the hero of the Police Department, is down and 
out, but ere he departed he received a farewell worthy of a man and 
a patriot. No such ovation has been tendered a citizen of this muni- 
cipality for many a long year. Judges, ex-Judges, Police Commis- 
sioners, ex-Police Commissioners, State Senators, ex-State Senators, 
Chief of Police, ex-Chief of Police, prosecuting officers, ex-prosecut- 
ing officers, policemen and ex-policemen, were out in force on the 
cold afternoon of Sunday last to honor the retiring officer. Speeches 
were in order and were worthy of the occasion. Judge Toohy, of 
course, was in all his glory. He frankly avowed that the Counselor 
had Kept him from making more fatal mistakes than, he was pained 
to know, stood to his debit, and had enabled him to bring the Jimmy 
Hope case at last to a decision. He was, however, more largely in- 
debted to the Counselor during the first three months of his term 
than he had ever been since. Chief Crowley acknowledged that 
Clarke would take all the brains of the Police Department with him 
to his private office across the street; and Commissioner Hammond 
waxed eloquent, and during a final eulogy of the Counselor was so 
overcome by his feelings that he fell back, into the arms of the Chief, 
exhausted. Ex-Prosecuting Attorney Graves bore testimony to the 
fact that the Counselor drafted the city's ordinances, controlled the 

golice in the matter of their enforcement, and guided the Police 
ourts as to the penalties that should be exacted under them. In 
point of fact, he (Graves) had nothing to do but ask Clarke what 
would happen and it did happen. It was a state of things " just too 
lovely for anything." Ex-Judge Kerral said it was all bosh to kick 
against shaving warrants when they all needed assistance in that 
way. Toohy and Murphy were growing rich enough to be above 
want. But when he was in office he did not do things that way, and 
he remembered that on one occasion he had hypothecated his salary 
warrants to the worthy Counselor three months in advance. Mr. 
Clarke came to the relief of poor but honest officials and helped them 
through, when otherwise their needs might have forced them to 
yield to temptation. He saluted his retiring friend as a benefactor. 
Senator Clunie was there to admit that he would not have pulled 
through at the last election but for the Counselor's skillful handling 
of things. He (Clunie) had, in the gratitude of his heart, passed a 
pension bill that would have given Clarke, Crowley and Lees $2,000 
tor life, but poor old Bartlett had knocked it out with an expiring 
kick, but it snould become law at the next session, or Waterman and 
Boruck were not the men he took them to be. We have not space for 
even a brief synopsis of the speeches that followed. It was the proud- 
est day of Counselor Clarke's long and useful life. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The statement is being made that there are ten thousand child- 
ren of schoolable age in San Francisco who are wandering at large 
about the streets as idle dissolute vagrants, and all because there is 
not enough school accommodation to provide for their wants. The 
statement is not true, however. The figures are made to indicate 
that the statement is nearer true than it ought to be, but then noth- 
ing is so deceptive as figures except facts. In the first place, there 
are not nearly the number of young people within the schoolable 
age that the census collectors represent. There is money in misrep- 
resenting things. The city's proportion of the State appropriation 
is increased by rolling up large figures. The system by which those 
figures are collected is manifestly imperfect. There is no thorough 
collection of the facts from house to house. The results reached are 
simply mere guess work. Each succeeding year the census officer 
feels compelled to add to the figures of his predecessor, and, as a 
consequence, fictitious returns are supplied which are palpably ex- 
cessive. Then there are more children attending other than public 
schools than is admitted. The number of parents able and anxious 
to control the nature and character of their children's education in 
private schools of their own selecting, is yearly increasing and will 
continue to increase. There are also a considerable number of 
young people under the maximum school age being educated in the 
evening schools. Again, there are boys in manufactories, offices, etc., 
throughout the city, who have not completed their school term, but 
who are fairly well educated. When allowance is made for all these, 
we think the ten thousand vagrants will have dwindled down to less 
than one-fifth of that number. No good purpose can be served by 
the gross exaggeration that is being indulged in. It is no doubt true 
that more and better school accommodation is needed, but it should 
be obtained by a just appreciation of what is really wanted, and not 
by false representations. 



SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL DIRECTORS. 
The papers are reviving the talk about our picturesque dollar-limit 
school houses. Doubtless the school-houses need renewal, hut the 
first essential preliminary to any extensive public liberality on the 
subject is a reform in the manner of spending the money. If all 
control over the building funds were taken out of the hands of the 
Board of Education there might be more generosity on the part of 
the taxpayers, and more buildings to show for it. This country made 
no very desperate struggles to get a navy when Robesons and Chand- 
lers stood at the toll-gate. The " Tough Old Board," with its " solid 
eight "and its carpenter-shop, wilted the enthusiasm of San Fran- 
cisco for lavish school expenditures. And have we any reason to 
suppose that any board can be trusted with an extraordinary appro- 
priation? Even when there was no surplus, when the teachers had 
to go without their pay, when classes were consolidated and salaries 
cut down to save expense, a high-salaried sinecure was created for 
Mr. J. G. Kennedy, an educational politician, who had been kicked 
out of San Jose for reducing the debauchery of female teachers to a 
system. If we wish to have a supply of modern school houses we 
should put their construction under the control of a salaried comis- 
sion, appointed by the Mayor, and not subject to confirmation by 
the Supervisors. 

Women hair-dressers are taking the place of the men. It's natur- 
al for a woman to want to get her hands into a man's hair. 



IS IT ANOTHER DASHAWAY STEAL? 
There is considerable stir in certain active circles in regard to the 
action of the few charter members of the Irish-American Benevolent 
Society in applying to Judge Wallace for permission to sell the so- 
ciety's property and divide the proceeds among its members. There 
is said to be in contemplation something very like the notorious 
Dashaway steal. A correspondent calls our attention to the subject 
and says " that the society was organized in W>2, and under its aus- 
pices the sick were cared for, the dead were buried, the widow and 
orphan were assisted, and the membership increased from the origin- 
al twenty-five to about six hundred, when it became the principal 
local representative of the Celtic race. In 1869 it purchased the valu- 
able lot on Howard street near Fourth, and thereon erected the pres- 
ent structure, known as Irish-American Hall, the corner-stone of 
which was laid with religious ceremonials by the late Father Hugh 
Gallagher, who appeared on the ground in full vestments. He then 
and there, in the name of God and of the Irish- American Society, 
dedicated the hall to the cause of benevolence forever. The society 
then flourished amazingly. Its balls and parties were well attended, 
and men who are now millionaires did not disdain to be present. Its 
annual picnics were honored, respected and well attended, there often 
being delegations present from Oregon and the neighboring Terri- 
tories. In 1875 it was estimated there were as many as 15,000 persons 
of Irish birth or parentage present. The society had its own physi- 
cian, supplied its members with medicine, and paid each member in 
good standing $8 per week during sickness. From the time of the 
society's highest progress, the rise of Irish-American influence in San 
Francisco is to be dated. At last that bane of most local organiza- 
tions made its appearance in the shape of politics. A cute butcher 
from the First Ward, whom I will call Thomas Shanigan, got himself 
elected to the Legislature; a shoemaker from Tar Flat succeeded in 
being elected to the same body. A third, who was known about town 
as 'the affidavit man/ became a ring Supervisor; and one or two 
others became dust agitators and spittoon renovaters around the 
old City Hall. Finally the political disease became epidemic. The 
favor of the society was the surest road to political preferment. 
When there were no more places to go round, bickerings and heart- 
burnings entered into the society, and its meetings were a very pan- 
demonium. Sham sickness and infirmities were now in order. One 
member on sick pay was a hod-carrier who had ' barked ' his shin on 
his way up a ladder; another was a tailor who had dislocated his 
thumb at a picnic, and a third could not follow his occupation be- 
cause of a boil behind; and so it went all along the line. Every 
mother's son of them who was not in office wanted his $8 a week for 
being left out in the cold. Some sturdy fellows who could not plead 
sick were actually caught forging picnic tickets as a means of making 
'a raise.' Other societies, such as the Caledonians, St. Andrew's, 
Italians, Scandinavians, have flourished. Now comes the fitting 
finale. The hall, dedicated as aforesaid, is to be sold, and a few bar- 
nacles who have held on are to get away with the ' unearned incre- 
ment' of that valuable property." We give our correspondent his 
say in the hope that true benevolence — that charity which begins at 
home— will yet save that hall property to the money-giving sons of 
Erin. 



The question has not yet been answered as to how certain men 
turn up on juries in the United States Courts in this city. It ought 
to be somebody's duty to find out. With no controlling "or supervis- 
ing authority at hand, Federal affairs have a strong tendency to go 
wrong on this coast. We are glad to observe that ex-Surveyor-Gen- 
eral Houghton has taken the hint we threw out last week and has 
been relieved from serving as the foreman of the Grand Jury whilst 
the land fraud cases are under consideration. The wonder is as to 
how he became foreman of that Jury at all. 

Grand Auction Sale 



S. &c O- . GUMP'S 
French and German Importation and Collection of 

OIL PAINTINGS, 

FRENCH BRONZES AND ITALIAN MARBLE BUSTS, 

On Tuesday, January 31st, and Wednesday, February 1st, 

AT 7:30 O'CLOCK EACH EVENING, 
At the S. F. Art Association Parlors, 430 Pine, below Kearny St. 

This Collection is beyond a doubt the best ever offered at public compe- 
tition in this city. We desire all lovers and connoisseurs of flue art to visit, 
this Choice Collection. Iu the Collection will be found 

" Entering the Convent/' by J. Rougier. 

This Celebrated Painting received the Medal at the Paris Salon in 1887. 
Value, $6,000. 

"The Duke's Visit to the Village Tavern," by 

Cesare Detti ; "The Gallant Friar," by A. Hum- 

borg; "The Life Boat," by George Haquette. 

Free Exhibition of the above Gems of Art will commence ou Wednesday, 
January 25th, at 9 o'clock A. M., and continue day and evening, at the Art 
Association Parlors, until aud during the Auction Sales. 



Jan. 21.J 



Easton, Eldridge & Co., 

Auctioneers. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



SAN KKANUsro NKWS LETTER. 



WINTER SONG. 
Why lU-t thoa *iiil tnd pale now ( 
Wnupptd i ii tliy snow whit.- v. til now, 

! »i-.ir mother ■ irtfa • •! oura .' 
When we Bprin iy m»wT 

Where Booimer'a plan i'<w? 

And thy bright FesUu r. .!><"• «.r tlowcrs? 
Thou sleep's! <-i it bereft now, 
Nor lamb nor sheep i-^ left now, 

In field or upland l>.ir.-. 
The bird*' '■wiri --<n^s are dumb now, 
Boshed i- tin- bee's sofl hum now, 

Yi-t even In Winter ;irt thou [air. 
< ta twigs and branches dancing, 
A thousand gleams are glancing. 

When- fir the eye may light. 

Who hath prepared thy bed 

The coverlid who bath spread nowf 

Ami decked thee with frost jewels bright? 
The bottDteous Lord of Heaven 

To thee thy vail hath given, 

Who sleeps not day or night. 
Be thy >leep Fearless taken, 
He doth the weary waken 

In good time to new strength ami light. 
Soon to Spring's breezes pleasant 
Thou'lt rise rejuvenescent, 

With new iiti' wondrous fair; 
When down their breath Hosts duly, 
Thou earth wilt prank thee newly * 

With wreaths of flower* upon thine hair. 

— From the Herman of Krummaclicr. 

THE STRIKE FOR STARVATION. 

If we are not remarkably mistaken in the character of San Fran- 
Ciscans, they will show the hakurs, tin- white cooks and waiters, and 
the rest <>t the impudent ablators engaged in the present strike, that 
there is a limit to their patience. The hare history of the disturb- 
ance, without note or comment, reads like a satire. According to 
the story, a certain Oerman baker exacted Sunday work from his 
men. They struck, as they had a right to do. To coerce the em- 
ployer more effectively, all the other union bakers in the city struck 
loo. There was no pretense that %he*t men were aggrieved in any 
way. Their employers were not asking them to work on Sunday. 
Their wages were satisfactory. They deserted their places without 
warning, because there happened to be a dispute in a single estab- 
lishment in the same line of business. Having achieved this triumph 
of reason, the oppressed workingman looked about for new worlds to 
conquer. The White Cooks and Waiters Benevolent and Protective 
Association decided that a good way to bring the refractory German 
baker to terms would be to close every restaurant in the" city, and 
make the dignity of labor a matter of personal experience to every 
member of the starving public. So the cooks and waiters all struck, 
and ordered the restaurant keepers to keep their places closed under 
penalty of $200 tine apiece. Not a single artist in grease or devasta- 
tor ol crockery complained of any personal grievance. The restau- 
rant keepers had no connection with the obnoxious baker, and noth- 
ing that they could do could influence his conduct. They were 
ordered to suspend their business and submit to a loss which, for the 
first three days, was estimated at $20,000, on the same principle upon 
which Mexican revolutionists levy forced loans upon neutral mer- 
chants. But even this was not enough. Having attempted to ruin 
business men against whom they had no complaint, having done all 
in their power to starve the San Francisco public, the strikers pro- 
ceeded to invest a city in which nobody had any grievance. There 
was one objectionable baker in San Francisco — there was none in 
Oakland. The wild insanity of involving Oakland in the row com- 
mended the scheme to the laboring mind, and every suburban res- 
taurant was ordered to close its doors— to what end, or for whose 
benefit, nobody but an inspired trance-medium would make an at- 
tempt to say. 

We have* tried conscientiously to find out what the strikers are 
driving at. They have held the usual mass meeting and passed the 
usual scathing resolutions, to all of which we have given faithful and 
laborious study. The first preamble informs us that " by the action 
of an employer of members of Union No. 24, after doing a lucrative 
business since the 17th of May last, when he agreed to certain condi- 
tions, who has come to the conclusion to compel our brother mem- 
bers of Union No. 24 to forfeit their day of rest. ' We have examined 
this statement right side up, upside down, and through blue glass. 
We have applied a Baconian cipher to it, and read it by the rules of 
Biblical exegesis, but still it towers proudly, defying the tooth of 
analysis as tne pyramids defy the tooth of time. A subsequent reso- 
lution, however, yields more light. It states, on behalf of the iour- 
neyrnan bakers, confectioners, white cooks, waiters and butchers, 
that " we will handle no meat, flour, crackers, milk, wood or coal, or 
anything that comes in the line of our different work that has been 
bought and delivered from any man or firm, who delivers the same 
goods to any boss or house-consumer in the connection of business 
with any one of those trades represented in the above unions, who 
does not comply with the demands of the same.*' Not only do our 
dish-smashing rulers propose to declare the community in a state of 
civil war, but they propose to carry on the war upon the principles of 
savages. Among civilized belligerents a neutral flag covers the 
enemy's goods. By the code of our sanguinary hash-mixers, the 
enemy's goods convert the neutral carrier into an enemy. There are 
to be no neutrals; we are all to be dragged into the fight by the ears. 
Very well; at best we can choose our side, as the strikers will realize 
when they recover. 

Messrs. George W. Meade & Co., having arranged their affairs 
with their creditors, have resumed business in this city and at their 
branches in Los Angeles, Fresno and Santa Clara. 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 



THE NEVADA BANK 

OF 8AN FRANOISOO. 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities January 1, 1888. 

ASSISTS. 

!5 C S' 5" ta !° •■•■ I SM.RW99 

I . 8. H.mds. i.'i.nOOOO 

UlsoeUaQei ins Bonds and Stocks.. .. 3,880 

Loan* "ii koul Estate - m 47 

Loans on Stocks. Bonds and Warrant L046.480 88 

Loans on othei Grain, etc 881 

Loams on Persona) Security LM7.722W 

Money 00 band ww/n.1 it 

Due from Banks and Bankers 8,004,647 49 

Other Assets 892,212 23 

Total Assets ... 812,146,08 5 21 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid Tp 13,000,000 00 

Reserve Fund 1,000,000 00 

Due Depositors . .... 8,648,148 "1 

Form Deposits ti'mjoo 00 

Due Uauks and Bankers... 3,008,055 52 

Profit and Loss Account 189,880 C8 

Total 812,146,08 i a 



State of California, I 

City and County ol San Francisco,! 8fl * 

We do solemnly swear that we have (and each of us has) a personal 
knowledge of the matters contained in the foregoing report, and that 
every allegation, statement, matter and thing therein contained is true, 
to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

JOHN F. 1IIGELOW, Vice-President, 
D. 11. DAVIDSON, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 11th day of January, 1SSS. 

.1. II. BLOOD, Notary Public. 



LIST OF STOCKHOLDERS. 

Warns. No. Shan ■ Bi \a\ 

James G. Fair 10,000 

James C. Flood y.500 

John W. Mackay 10,000 

R. H. Follis 260 

J. F. Bigelow 250 



'ALEXANDRE" KID GLOVES! 



Having been appointed SOLE AGENTS in San Francisco for the sale of 
the Celebrated " Alexandre " Kid Gloves, we take pleasure in announcing 
to the general public that we have in stock complete lines of these Gloves, 
of all lengths, shades and sizes, with plain and embroidered backs. 

That these GLOVES rank as the very fiuest among all competitors for 
public favor, is fully conceded, they being well and favorably known 
throughout the country for years, as the 

HIGHEST-CLASS KID GLOVE 

sold by the late A. T. Stewart & Co., of New York. 

We cordially invite close inspection of these Excellent Gloves by the 
ladies of this Coast, confident that the Glove will win favor here, as it 
always has, wherever known. 



Orders by Mail or Telephone Promptly Executed, 
tioods delivered free of carriage charges in Berkeley, Oakland, Ala- 
medaand Fruitvale. 




MURPHY BUILDING, 
MARKET STREE1T, CORNER JONES, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



A SLIGHT MISTAKE. 
Scene i. 

(Enter Hector's friend, speaking to servant outside): Take my card to 
the lady, if you please. I am in a hurry. (Alone): Last night, at 
the club, my friend, Hector Duval, took me off in a corner: "Wynne, 
my dear fellow," said he, " will you grant me a great favor?" To 
which I answered without hesitation, " Sorry, my boy, but I have 
had empty pockets for eight days ! Latour owes me a hundred dol- 
lars; it is'three weeks now since he borrowed, and he does not seem 
to remember it. You know I can't go to him and say, 'You owe me.' " 

" It is nothing about money." 

"Ah, no ! Then tell your story." 

He was charmed with a gay widow, but his straight-laced family 
disapproved. They had made him agree to marry his cousin, a lady 
of blue blood and lots of money. It was now necessary for him to 
break with the widow, and I was charged with the sad commission of 
carrying the news to her. That was the favor he wished. Hector 
said": " Go, my dear fellow; here are her letters; be eloquent, touch- 
ing, persuasive, and God bless you." 

At first I was full of confidence, but afterwards, I don't know how, 
I became all at once rather shaky. It would have been better to have 
seen her immediately. Slap! Bang! I might have fired off my gun 
right away, but now, now, I don't know — I 

(Lady is heard singing. Hector's Friend, joining in the chorus): I have 
a good voice too. 

Scene ii. 

(The Lady enters, and then exclaims): A stranger! 

The Friend; I beg your pardon, rnadani, if I introduce myself. 
I— 1 

Lady: Excuse me, sir, who are you? "What do you wish? 

Friend: Madam, I am the Count Oscar Wynne. 

Lady: Wynne! Is it possible that you are related to Angelina 
Wynne? 

Friend (ast07iished) : She is my sister, madam ; do you know her? 

Lndy: Certainly. We were at school together. What has become 
of her? 

Friend: She married General Valleau. 

Lady: I married, and I was a widow in one year after. (She wipes 
away a tear). 

Friend: I am sorry to have revived melancholy recollections. 

Lady: There is a pleasure in melancholy. But as I look at you— 

gray tell me if you do not go to the Tuesday receptions of the 
ouutess Bellerive? 

Friend: Certainly I do. I said to myself, the moment you came 
in, "There she is!" 

Lady: Good ! Since we are old friends, tell me quick what brought 
you here. 

Friend, (aside): The situation gets complicated. I would have pre- 
ferred not to be known. 

Lady: Tell me quick. I am very curious. 

Friend (sighs): Good Lord, madam, it is very hard to speak. 

Lady: I could not divine 

Friend: Certainly not. 

Lady: Then speak. 

Friend (with an effort): 1 came to — talk to you — about — htm. 

Lady: Ah! Great Heavens! Is he ill? 

Friend: Worse than that. 

Lady (shrieks): Ah, he is dead. 

Friend: No, madam, no; calm yourself. 

Lady: Speak, sir, I am strong. I have courage; I have suffered so 
much already. Don't try to spare me; he is dead; is it not so? He 
is dead ! He* has fought a duel ! Ah, speak, you are killing me ! 

Friend: I swear to you, on my honor as a gentleman, he is as well 
as you or I. 

Lady: 1 do not understand. 

Friend: Wait a moment, madam. I am coming to it. You are 
brave, and I am a bad diplomat. Our friend is going to be married. 
That is it. 

Lady (after weeping in silence): I would rather see him dead. 

Friend (aside): Dear little woman! 

Lady: I loved him with all my soul, and one fine morning he sends 
a friend to announce the news— all is ended. (She weeps). 

Friend: For mercy's sake, madam 

Lady: Ah, don't try to console me. The world is ignoble. A widow 
is not supposed to need the sympathy a girl can expect in a case of 
desertion. " It was a widow ; it does not matter." That is the way 
they talk. 

Friend: No, madam, they do not say so. People with any heart 
pity a woman who has been jilted. 

Lady: There it is! One sacrifices one's self , for years perhaps, to 
receive that smiling pity which is the worst affront for a woman. 

Friend: Allow me to say that you exaggerate in a singular manner. 

Lady (rising): I swear to you that I wul prevent that marriage; it 
shall not take place. I swear it. 

Friend (aside): That is just what I was afraid of. (Aloud): Ah, 
madam, what is that you say? 

Lady: The truth, sir. By every possible means I will put a stop to 
that marriage. 

Friend: Unfortunately, dear madam, there is noway by which a 
woman can hinder her lover from marrying. 

Lady: I will rind one; I will go to "the length of a scandal; we 
shall see. 

Friend: You might cast a chill over the scene; but the ceremony 
would take place all the same. You might throw a bottle of vitriol 
in his face ; but it is only washerwomen who do that now. Believe 
me, madam, it is better to accept this sad event, as it is necessary to 
take all the troubles God sends us. You are not so unfortunate as 
many others; there will always be plenty of people who will seek to 
console you." 

Lady: You are impertinent, sir. 

Friend: X am truthful. If I had not known that vou were very 
handsome I should never have come on this melancholy mission. 



Lady: For Heaven's sake, sir, no flattery, I beg of you, if you know 
how my heart is broken. 

Friend: I understand. 

Lady: No, you cannot know all I have put in that affection. 

Friend: I can imagine. 

Lady: I never went anywhere, sir. Excepting the Park, the races, 
first nights of new plays, three or four balls in the Winter, some din- 
ner parties, a month at the sea-side and a month at the springs, I 
lived like a hermit. I received few people. My life was devoted to 
him. What am I now? 

Friend: You are the most amiable, the most charming of women. 

Lady: Who is the lady who is going to marry him ? 

Friend: His cousin. 

Lady: Is she pretty? 

Friend: Alas! 

Lady: Rich? 

Friend: Zounds! Without that 

Lady: Then he does not love her? 

Friend: Not a bit. 

Lady: Very well, sir. Your friend is more contemptible than I 
thought. So it is for money that he leaves me. It is monstrous. 
You know that. 

Friend: Good Lord 

Lndy; Don't try to excuse him. He is a miserable wretch ! To 
forsake affection for some miserable coin. 

Friend: Half a million and a fine mansion. 

Lady: Eh ! What does it matter about the price? 

Friend; He had debts; he was hard pressed by his family 

Lady: Yes, I know; his family hate me, but I will be avenged. 
Just now, while you talked to me, I felt the shadow of a good senti- 
ment in my heart. I said to myself : "If he abandons me it is be- 
cause he no longer loves me, perhaps has never loved me. He loves 
another ; let me sacrifice myself. The poor young girl he loves is in- 
nocent of the pain I suffer. Why should *I punish her? Why de- 
stroy her illusions and make her life forever wretched? Yes, this is 
what I was stupidly saying to m3'self when you avowed that it was 
not a question of love, but of money. 

Friend: Ah, but excuse me, I don't know 

Lady (in an outburst): Ah, you see that he loves her, ( Weeps with 
her head turned away). 

Friend: I am a great fool. Truly it is too stupid, Madam. She is 
going into hysterics; the devil take me! (Pulls the bell). Nobody 
comes! Poor woman! She interests me. She is charming. Madam"! 
She does not stir. (He takes her hand). Adorable hand! Madam! 
(He kisses her hand). If anybody conies in I shall have to say we are 
to be married. Well, I am foolish. I have seldom seen a more beau- 
tiful hand. (Fusses it, embraces it). 

Lady coming to herself): You are very good, you are. 

Friend: Yes, it is my specialty. You are so beautiful in your de- 
spair; then you have such a charming hand. 

Lady: Let it go, or else (Feigns boxing his ear). 

Friend: Good! I see that you are better. You know the proverb: 
' There are no lasting griefs, there are no lasting loves.' 

Lady: Perhaps it is true. 

Friend: Pardon me if I have not accomplished, with all the tact 
desirable, the delicate mission which was confided to me, and I beg, 
if you keep any remembrance of me, that it will not be an unpleasant 
one. Here are your letters. 

Lady (taking the package): How much hope, how much lost happi- 
ness are there! (She weeps). 

Friend: Ah, I beg of you, you will make yourself ill. 

Lady: I shall die! 

Friend; Come, come ! Be courageous! 

Lady: It is too much for me; I am choking! 

(She is about to fall. Hrctor's friend puts his arm, around her. She 
weeps upon his shoulder, antl gradually grows calm). 

Friend: Your letters are all scattered. 

Lady: Ah, you can read them. They contain the foolishness of a 
poor woman who believed that she was loved. 

Friend: And who deserved to be loved. 

Lady: We shall see. 

Friend: Then I can announce to him a treaty of peace. 

Lady: No, a treaty of forge tfulu ess. 

Friend: The Duva'ls will overwhelm me with gratitude. 

Lady: The Duvals! Who are they? 

Friend: What! "Who are they? 'Hector's family. 

Lady: Who is Hector? 

Friend: What joking! Hector Duval, of course. 

Lady: I don't know him. 

Friend: Ah, this is worthy of the poet: ' To forget one foresworn 
to the point of ignoring him. It is the best vengeance; he will be 
enraged. 

Lady: I don't understand you, or rather, I tremble to understand. 
(Picks up one of the letter.'! which strew the carpet). These letters are 
not mine. 

Friend (astounded): What! Notvours? Then you are not Madam 
Falerne ? 

Lady (stupefied): No, sir; she lives upstairs ! 

Translated from />,, /->, nch for the S. F. Nt ms Letter, by E. F. Dawson. 

Since we commenced the publication of the series of artotvpes 
known as "Artistic Homes of California," there has been a continu- 
ous inquiry for back numbers. Having reprinted those of which the 
edition was exhausted, we are now in a position to supply all 
who wish to have a complete file of these pictures. Neat and attract- 
ive portfolios, made expressly for preserving the artotypes, are for 
sale at the business office, Fourth and Market-streets Building, for 
fifty cents each. 

Mahogany Rockers ! 
Burnished gold trimmings— our original designs. Chadbourne's, 
741, 743 and 745 Market street. 

A man with an elastic conscience does not necessarily have a cork soul, 
but if his wife wants to preserve her complexion she must use Madame 
Rachel's Bloom of Youth. 



Jan. 21. 1SSS. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



EACH DAY. 
Be on TOUT tfuanl ! The WOfM is fair— 

Don't Keep too long, a hanl, Don'i Let the weigh) of car* 

Relentless i Becloud the sight; 

Yon*re chasing wealth For what Is life, 

Don't andermine your health, it through Incessant 

And lose the raoel Thara'a naught that's bright? 

Lira well each day, 
Not look too fai away 
Fur joy and rest : 
Who mingles these 
With work the day decrees, 
i - truly blast. 
Oakland, January 21. 1«88. Dk LaN< 

THE RING REVIVAL. 
It seems probable that a new edition ol Piarce Bgan's " Boxiana " 
should sell in these days. The ring has become an institution pa- 
tronized by the good and great once more. "Say, mister, Rive us a 
quarter t<- go to the the-oy-ter? " " What theatre do you want to go 
to, sonny? "1 want to go to the Bowery, w'ere 1 kin see Tom 
Beyer 'n the b'hoys a fightfc' in ther pit." The ring was in its de- 
cadence then, when the redoubtable Tom Heyer and Yankee Sulli- 
van and Bill Poole and John Morrissev were names familiar in men's 
mouths. Yet when Bill Poole died, New York ^ave him the biggest 
funeral she ever gave to anybody till thatol Lincoln. And did not 

Mr. Thackeray himself, the great lay preacher and mighty moralist, 
moralize heartily over the mill between Tom Savers and the Benicia 
Boy, and confess bis satisfaction that his own countryman was not 

defeated? in truth, human interest in the ring und its battles has 
not nagged from the earlier days of Ben Caunt and Dan Donnelly, of 
BendigO, and the Tipton Slasher, patronized by great nobles, and'em- 
balmeo in literature down to these present. "What really happened 
was this: A verv young woman came to the throne of England. 
Shortly afterwards she married a foreigner, who never had a hearty 
feeling for English sports; court manners changed, and with them 
the manners of society changed ; the ring became rather disreputa- 
ble, and patronized principalis' by raffs and legs. Now the pendu- 
lum is swinging back again. That young woman s son is an influence 
in giving the tone to society. A part of the girlishness and Podsnap- 
pery that came in with the girl Victoria is" going out with the later 
years of great-grandma Victoria; and if the change is not all good, 
| it is perhaps not altogether bad. The relish with which men of let- 
ter* wrote up the old mills attests the attraction they had for others 
thati ■' bloods " and " the fancy." Now listen how one bewailed the 
untimely death of Donnelly, whose mortal remains were followed by 
" LOO carriages, 400 horsemen and over 50,000 a foot:" 

* * * 'Tis done. (Ireen-mantled Erin 
May weep her hopes of milling sway past by, 
And Cribb, sublime, no lowlier rival fearing. 
Repose, sole Amnion of the fistic sky. 
Conceited, quailing his blue ruin high, 
Till comes the Swell, that come to all men must, 
By whose fowl blows Sir Daniel low doth lie, 
Summons the Champion to resign his trust. 
And mingles his with Kings', Slaves', Chieftains', Beggars' dust. 

FASHIONABLE NOTES. 

Miss Birdie McGmnis, of 700093 Minna street, tendered a vacci- 
nation social to her young friends last Saturday evening. An enjoy- 
able feature of the occasion was a test of some native California 
virus furnished by the genteel and accommodating caterers of San 
Rafael. After the'operations Terpsichorean festivities were indulged 
in until a late hour. 

The O'Hoolahan mansion on Clemantina street will not be the scene 
of the expected soiree da-wante next week. Social duties having over- 
taxed the health of the family, they have taken apartments in the 
pest-house. 

The ingenious society leader. Miss Belle Fahey, of 4860000 Tehama 
street, has devised a new form of fashionable entertainment, it is a 
development of the once popular " mum social." The fun will con- 
sist in seeing how long the guests can refrain from scratching their 
arms. The one who scratches first will be required to pay a forfeit. 

The highest social circles, on the very nob of Telegraph Hill, are 
in a flutter over the latest achievement of Mr. Reginald O* Bleary, the 
talented and stylish young water-color artist. Mr. O'Bleary, whose 
efforts hitherto have been principally directed to rehabilitating the 
discolored eyes of the fistic champions of the Hill, has advanced to 
the conquest of a new realm of art which he has made all his own. 
He has succeeded in so cunningly disguising the pustular autograph 
of the fashionable malady that persons in the most conspicuous stage 
of the disease can accost a Health Inspector without exciting sus- 
picion. 

The guests at the Mariners' haven, 980000 Washington street, will 
give a fumigation party next Wednesday evening. The exercises will 
be conducted upon a novel and interesting plan. The guests will 
remain in the house as long as possible. A handsome prize has been 
provided for the one displaying the greatest endurance, and an amus- 
ing booby prize will be given to the one who first seeks relief in the 
outer air. Should all the usual disinfectants prove ineffective, the 
house will be finally cleared by burning indigenous cigars. 

Silver Furniture ! 
Never before shown in this market. Chadbourne's, 741, 743 and 745 
Market street. 

The boy who pursues the natural bent of his mind naturally crooks a 
good many pius, but when he grows up he will be sure to go to J. W. Car- 
many, No. 25 Kearny street, to get his clothes made. 

A well-nourished body is impervious to the cold. Bear this fact iu 
mind, and drop into Moraghan's Parlors, Nos. 68 and 69 California Market, 
and try a dozen or two of those luscious East River Oysters. 



NEW ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION (LIMITED). 

CAPITAL ..£2.000.000 I Subscribed and Paid Up £600.000 

HEAD OFFICE-40 THREADNEEDLE STREET. LONDON. 

Haskkkm.- I'iiIiiii Bunk ..( I I., i, [Limited] nil. I II, mk ,.( SOOtUUd. 

Edinburgh Agcucj .: I 3L Andreu - , 

Branches— Bombay, Calcutta, i ..I., ml,,,. lUdru. Murittus, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Singapore, Yokohama, In viistrallant Uolbi 

I hi liiuik Buysand 
Issue, Lettei ol Credit and circular Notes avails 

forwards Bills for Collect! undertakes the Purchase and 

rules, holds them for safe custody, and realists Interests and dividends 
Collects I'.iy mi, I Pen Ion Ps . ■ i ■ u ranee Premiums and Club Su 
,1 Transacts Banking and A , rally. 

Fixed Deposits reoetved f,,r upwards of 12 months <u B per cent and ni 
correspondingly rfrrorablo rates for shorter perl oi 

Tin- fullest Information can I btaJnea i>y application atauyofthe 

branches un,| agencies, <>r at the head office. 

8epl. 24. J GEORGE WILLIAM THOMS ON, Secretary. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

322 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

amccroRS .- 

ill AS. CROCKER, | K. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH PUBIDBMT. 

W.E.BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER CaSBTBB, 

i oct. ay 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited, 

Capital $2,100,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. June 9. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

206 Sansome Street 

Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $150,000. 

Head Office 9 and 10, Tokeuhouse Yard, Lothbury, Loudon 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the Loudon, Paris aud American Bauk 
(Ltd.), 46 Exchange Place. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres ACfe, 17 Bou levari, 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, ) m , 10 „ qi . u 

EUliENE MEYER, 1 Wau agers. 
C. Altschul, Cashier. [March 26. 

THE AN6L0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT-J. W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, 16,000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy aud sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW. I „.„-„.., 

IGN. STEINHART,! Managers. 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. [March 26. 

BANK OMJRmsTccWBIAT" 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $1,875,000 

RESERVE FUND 450,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanalmo and 

Kamloops, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bauk of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bauk; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America: CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
India Australia aud China: AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Bank o 
Australasia, Commercial Baukiug Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bauk aud National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West IndiesJ—Colomal Bank. [March 26. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

DEUTSCHE SPAR I Mi LEIHIIAIK. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco. 

OFFICERS— President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors— L. Gottig, Fred 

Roeding, F. Tillman. Edw. Krusc, George U. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Igu. 

Steinhart, A. E. Hecht, O. Schoemfluu. Secretary, Geo. Lette. Attorneys, 

Jaeboe & H abbisok. May 14. 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300000 

OFFICERS: 

President .JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President . . W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. Aug. 22. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." Tom Moore. 

It appears that Mr. Hayman need not have been so strenuous in 
his desire that the Carleton engagement should begin with a new 
opera, for the three old favorites of this week have drawn crowded 
houses in spite of snow, rain and cold. The performances of The Merry 
War, Nanon and Erminie have given'.rene wed evidence of the strength of 
Mr. Carleton's company, and of his admirable discipline and manage- 
ment. Nanon and Erminie were heard at the Bush St. last Winter, and 
the only important changes in their casts arise from the substitution 
of Lily Post for Alice Vincent, and J. K. Murray for J. S. Greensfelder. 
It is longer since The Merry War was done here, and Carleton, 
Rose Beaudet and Clara Wisdom are the only survivals from the 
cast of 1884. There is, if anything, an improvement in voice and 
style among the principals since they were last beard here. Mr. 
Carleton is at his best, and Jay C. Taylor is surpassing himself, 
while Drew is as delightfully funny as ever. Fanny Rice is singing 
better than before (although" the huskiness of her voice and the tight- 
laced shortness of her breath have not disappeared), and acts with 
the same fascinating piquancy ; the stately Clara Wisdom and Rose 
Beaudet are again a pleasure to eye and ear, and Ehrendt's rather me- 
chanical fun and Robert Broderick's voice are as acceptable as before. 
Mr. Murray, whom Carleton secured from the moribund Thompson 
company at the California a year ago, is a welcome addition, and if 
not quite so long-winded as Oreensfelder in the last act of Nanon, is 
on the whole more agreeable. Miss Lily Post seems hardly at her 
best, as she has been suffering from a severe cold, but she sings the 
music with care, and generally with gcod effect. By particular 
request, a performance of The Mikado will be given to-morrow 
evening. Cellier's Dorothy, the novelty of the season, will be produced 
on Monday with that elegance and completeness of stage setting for 
which the "Baldwin is noted, and which were displayed in the original 
productions of Nanon and The Mikado. 

***** 

The attraction at the Bush-street this week is the Redmond-Barry 
company in Rene, a version by Mr. Redmond of the romantic drama 
by Watts Phillips called The Huguenot Captain, which had a consider- 
able run in London, and was given at Maguire's Opera House twenty 
years ago. Mr. Redmond is an accomplished actor, with a tine face 
and figure and a musical voice, and acts the part of Rene, the Hu- 
guenot captain, with great spirit. The role of the Duchess d'Armon- 
ville is carried with force by Mrs. Thomas Barry, and the minor 
characters are in competent hands, A duel with sword and poinard 
between Rene and the young Duke d'Armonville is perhaps the most 
realistic contest ever given liere; and among the incidental attrac- 
tions of the play are a corps of gipsy dancers and acrobats, whose 
feats are much applauded. On Monday the company will appear in 
Mr. Redmond's new French domestic drama, called Ucrminie, or The 
Gross of Gold, in a prologue and three acts, dealing with the existing 
eventsin France during the reign of the first Napoleon. 

***** 

The remarkable drawing qualities of Uncle Tom's Cabin have often 
been discussed. It is therefore not astonishing that the Alcazar re- 
vival this week was largely attended. The play was acted with the 
characteristic vim and spirit of the Alcazar company. Stockwell, 
who first became known to theatrical fame by his Lawyer Marks, 
reveled in his old part. 

■k * * * * 

At the California Theatre the audiences have increased in size, 
since it was known that in the two ballets introduced in Around the 
World Kiralfy bad done some of his best work. 

***** 

In A Dark Secret, which is the melodramatic attraction at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre next week, there is a great realistic effect — a regatta 
scene — which has created everywhere, with the assistance of a local 
rowing celebrity, a big sensation. Peterson, the champion of the 
hay, is engaged for the production here. 

* " * * * 

When it was announced that the Redmund-Barry Company, a 
complete organization by itself, traveling in its own car, included a 
chorus, it was feared by the public that one of the cherished tradi- 
tions of the San Francisco stage would be shattered. But the first 
representation re-assured every one— Mr. Charles Morel was in the 
chorus. 

***** 

Henry Heyman's next chamber-music condert is announced for the 
27th of this month. The quartette will be assisted by Miss Celia Ad- 
ler. vocalist, and Miss Gregg, pianiste. 

* * * * * 

Madame Louisa Pyk, who is beyond doubt one of the most artistic 
concert singers ever heard in SanFrancisco, will soon be afforded an 
opportunity of thoroughly introducing herself to the music-loving 
public. So far, her appearances on the concert stage have been limit- 
ed to occasions which appealed to but a limited few. The leading so- 
ciety ladies have united in asking Madame Pyk to select a date tor a 
testimonial concert, and she has selected Monday evening, January 
30th, at B'naiB'rith Hall. 

***** 

There is in store for San Francisco, for the very near future, a 
musical treat, such as it would be difficult to parallel. Josef Hoff- 
mann, the wonderful pianist — a mere boy in years — will soon be here, 
accompanied by a strong company, which "includes Mme. Helene 
Hastreiter, a great contralto, Signof De Ana, a baritone who estab- 
lished himself as a favorite when here with Mapleson, and Nellie 
Carpenter, the young girl violinist, referred to a few weeks ago in 
this department. Of Josef Hoifmanri nothing can be said in advance 
which, while doing him justice, would be accepted by readers without 
some degree of skepticism. It is therefore better to say nothing. 
***** 

The amateur performance on Thursday evening at the Grand 
Opera House occurred too late in the week for comment in this issue. 

Beauclerc. 



BALDWIN THEATRE. 



(THE LEADING THEATRE.) 
Al. Hayman Lessee and Manager 

Every Evening (including Sunday) and Saturday Matiuee. For a limited 
engagement. The justly popular CAKLETON OPERA COMPANY, Includ- 
ing Lily Post, Fauuy Rice, Clara Wisdom, Rose Beaudet, Margaret Baxter, 
Emily "Sevmour, Charles H. Drew, Jay Taylor, Herroau Ehrendt, J. K. 
Murray, Robert Broderick and Mr. W. T. Carletou. Saturday Matinee (last 
time)— MERRY WAR. Saturday Night (last time)— ERMINIE. Sunday 
Night (only time) by request— MIKADO. 

Next Monday— Magnificent Production of 

DOEOTHYI 

Seats now on Sale. Regular Prices.! I Jan. 21. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE — 25, 35, 50 and 75c. 

Under the Management of Al. Hayman and Lewis Morrison. 
Monday Evening, January 23,1888, Every Evening and Saturday Matinee- 
Elaborate Production of the Latest and Greatest English Melodramatic 
Success, 

-a. x>_a»:e&ic seceet. 

THE GREAT HENLEY REGATTA SCENE, 
For which 2,250 square feet of the Stage will be flooded with over five 
thousand cubic feet of Real Water, varying in depth from two to seven 
feet. rjan. 21. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE. 



Wallenrod, Osbourne & Stockwell, Managers— Geo. Wallenrod, Lessee 

This Evening at 8 o'clock, and during the week. Matinee Saturday at 2- 
Special Revival of 

TTItsrCXilE TOM'S C^ZBTZDsT. • 

Characters by OSBOURNE and STOCKWELL and their Company of 
Comedians. 

£j^- Popular Prices— 25c, 50c and 75c. 

Next Monday, January 23d— BAIRD'S MAMMOTH MINSTREL COM- 
PANY. [Jan. 21. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt Proprietor | Chas. P. Hall 

This Evening, WM. REDMOND and MRS. THOS. BARRY. 

" E. IE 2sT IE . " 
Unanimous indorsement by the Press. 
Monday, January 23d— 



..Manager 



IIIEIRJVIIIinsri: OE.THB CROSS O^G-OXjJD. 
' [Jau. 21. J 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Keeling Bros Sole Proprietors and Managers 

Saturday and Sunday Evenings, Last Chance to take 

.A. TBIP TO THE IMZOOZTSF I 
The Greatest Spectacle ever produced in San Francisco. 
Monday Evening, January 23d — First Time on this Coast, 

TIHIIE ATIXjID^a-E COQTJETTE. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES-25 and 50 Cents. [Jan. 21. 

MISS SARAH 0. HAMLIN, A. M-, 

Will give TWO Lectures, illustrated with the Oxy-Hydrogen Light, at 
URTVTrera- HAL!,. 

I. Villi, USD OF MIAKtSPtARE. 
II.— SWITZERLAND, through Savoy aud the Oberl»ii<l. 

Mouday Matiuee January 23, at 3:30 

Wednesday Evening Jan. 25, at 8 | Friday Evening Jan. 27, at 8 

Tickets for the TWO Lectures, jl. 00; Single Ticket, 75c. Reserved seats 
can now be procured, without extra charge, at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Music 
Store. [Jan. 14. J MARCUS M. HENRY, Business Manager. 

THE MONSTER PANORAMA 

Of the Famous Laud aud Naval 

BATTLES OF "VICISISBTJ'^G- ! 
Open daily from 9 A. M. to 11 P. M., corner Ma^on and Eddy streets. 

Balloons for the Children Every Saturday. [Jan. 21. 



GRAND PANORAMA! 

Superb Battle Pictures Amidst Magnificent Scenery. Storming of 
Missionary Ridge. Loohont Mountain. Chal tanoog'a. 

Opeu 9 A. M. to 11 p. m., daily (including Sundays), cor. Market and Tenth 
Admission, 50c. Children half price. [Jan. 21. 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE BASEBALL GROUNDS, 

End of Haight-street Cable Road. 

SATURDAY, Jan. 21st, at 2:30 o'clock P. M ST. LOUIS BROWNS vs. 

UREENHOOD & MORANS. 

SUNDAY, Jan. 22d, 11 o'clock a. m WILL & FINCKS vs. REPORTS 

At2o'clock P.M NEW YORK GIANTS vs. ST. LOUIS BROWNS. 

Admission, 25 and 10 cents. Ladies free on Saturday. Reserved seats on 
Sundays, 26 cents extra. 

Seats can be secured atG-unst's Cigar Store, junction Market and O'Farrell 
streets, until 10 o'clock on day of game. [Jan. 21. 

MADAME INEZ FABBRI-MULLER 

Respectfully informs the musical public of San Francisco that her new 
Vocal Classes commenced at her Studio, 1008 Post Street, above Larkin, 
on Wednesday, January 3d, 18S8. Pupils received daily from 2 to 4 o'clock 
p. m., for trying of the voice. [Jan. 21. 



Eclipse Extra Dry I 



Finer than the class of Champagnes 
sent from Fiance to this country, but 
without Brandy. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



san FRANCISCO NEWS LET] 1:1:. 



'.' 



SPORTING. 



Tin* Pacific Coast Honiara seem tu imvt- fullm Into Insignificance 
tinea Iba Amateur Association asttumed charge ot Ihelasl . 
out-door meeting. I think tint no jfreater set-back could be pveu i<> 
sar oat-door eporta than to have this organisation, now mori- 
bund, pan out "i existence. There are in the ranks nearly :ill <>i the 
prominent sprinters, Jumpers end all around athletes "n thi 
The Directors were al one time enthusiastic and earnest in their 

efforts to stimulate competition a in- the amateurs, the meets were 

wall attended, excellenl records were ntadtt,and the best men in aU 
the clubs entered toe Tariom contests , yet Ihhi association Is dying. 
it i- the duty ol some ol the once m tire members i" come to the 
front once mora and arrange :i Saturday afternoon programme, a 
cross-country run, or anything almost totnaognratea revival. The 
bicyclers would only be too willing to lend their assistance il neces- 
sary, and altogether it should not i><- a very difficult matter to a*-t up 
some kind ol attraction. As it is, the cfaba have the promotion ol 
out-door Karnes in their bands, and the club-men usually devote their 
attentions Bolely to In-door exercise. Hut one athletic club, the 
Olympic, makes any pretensions to fostering out-door sports. The 
Directors have selected Washington's birthday as the date for the 
annual meeting, and it is safe to predict that good records will be 
made in running and walking. The Directors are endeavoring to 

close an agreement With Harry Bethune, the professional sprinter, to 

attempt to equal or excel Harry III. Johnson's famous record for 100 
yards, Johnson la officially credited with having covered the distance 
in :< l-fi seconds, while Bob Haley Could never gel his marvelous per- 
formance, equally a- p>od, accepted as correct. Besides Johnson, 
Bethune, KiUleman and Harry tout are probably the only men alive 
who can run under ten seconds, l'.ethune will also be asked to at- 
tempt to break the 125 yard record of l2*,i seconds. It would, of 
be better if a bona fide match between Bethune and some pro- 
nal could be arranged. This seems an impossibility, for bona 
A"-/? sprinting contests among professionals are a rarity. 

» " * » * * 

The duck hunters certainly cannot complain of a poor season this 
year. Large flocks of canvasback have been seen at the principal 
hunting resorts, and the sportsmen have turned out to give them a 
tilting reception. I hear uf marvelous hags being taken. This is no 
new story to any hunter, and the yarns this year have a wonderfully 
familiar sound. I have heard one story over five times in as many 
years from one of my friends, and I am told he has the identical lie— 
or. at least, the material facts— salted away for my edification next 
year. These experiences are common, however, to all who have any 
interest whatever in gunning. 

• «•«** 

The fishermen have not done well this week. They have had such 
a fine carnival of sport on the Marin County shore, that it was too 

e 1 to last. Despite the cold weather, they have been out with their 

lines and boats nearly all the week, but the fish seem to have given 
over biting, or have become discouraged by the cold weather and 
quit. Some small strings have been captured, but they are the ex- 
ceptions. Usually the fishermen have caught nothing. Salmon-trout 
Hailing is not good, and altogether the disciples of the hook, bait and 
line must soon turn to some other mode of passing Sunday. 
***** 

The Olympics gave a fine programme last night to their lady 
friends. 'The ladies' night exhibitions do not come frequently, and 
it might be a desirable plan for the directors to have such entertain- 
ments at least once a month. The ladies invariably turn out well, to 
encourage with smiles and that dainty feminine applause which is 
calculated to fire the athlete's heart. ' Only the best exhibitions of 
skill and strength are ever seen at these entertainments, and now 
that slogging at any time is barred, the Club has reason to expect 
more approbation of its exhibitions than ever. I have made a careful 
canvass of the Club, selecting the representative members and per- 
formers, and I find that it is the almost unanimous desire that the 
ladies be invited oftener. The directors will be asked to comply with 
the wishes of the Club, and will no doubt do so. 

The votaries of the fascinating game of billiards have several treats 
in store for them. McCleary is surprising the knowing ones with his 
exhibitions, and a tournament is announced shortly. Such affairs 
have always drawn well with a certain set, and the coming event will 
certainly not prove an exception. The love for the game once ac- 
quired, it never relaxes. 

***** 

Football will be seen in all its gory glory after February 18th. On 
that day the California League will begin the Spring series, under the 
inter-collegiate rules. While no more public contests will be seen be- 
fore that day, the teams will be constantly in practice. The Uni- 
versity Club is by all means the favorite one, but it must be confessed 
that the San Franciscos and Volunteers have done good, telling work 
in the matches thus far played. 

* * * » * 

That the game of baseball has obtained a permanent footing here 
has been fully demonstrated by the attendance at the two last games 
played by the Browns and New Yorks at the Haight-street grounds. 
Although the weather was bitterly cold last Sunday, and chilled one 
to the marrow, upwards of six thousand people withstood our newly- 
arrived Arctic visitor for two hours, and saw the Giants handsomely 
Uefeat the Browns. The game was brilliantly played, and Van 
Haltren covered himself with that glory a baseball pitcher so much 
covets.— - - The champion Pioneers played the Browns a very inter- 
esting game last Saturday. The Browns have the advantage over 

the Giants, as the former play the local clubs every Saturday, and 

are kept in better practice. When Spaulding, of the Chicagos, 

read that Van Haltren had retired the Browns, last Sunday, without 
a safe hit being made off of his delivery, he must have congratulated 
himself that he had Van's signature already attached to a contract. 
It is not often that a pitcher can point to the record Van Haltren 



made laal Sunilut , partii-uhii | u h of the calibre ol the 
Browns. The Brow in plu> the Greenfa I & M or ana this after- 
it the Halght-strecl grounds, Van Haltren will occupy the 

" the home club The combination playing under the 

ol the Los Angeles Club wa« advertised to play Saturdaj and Sun 
Central I'ark. ugniuM • California players, but as 

the c biuation failed to mat. i mies were nol played, but 

instead the Emerson* and Alcazars, o! the Callfoi i 
so-called- played. The former nearly wiped the latter o 

I a score of twenty-two to nothing. The dally paper 

mistaken in asserting thai Lou Bardie played first base for the 
Golden Rules at the Ilaiglu-streel Grounds last Sunday. I 

not yet joined the amateurs. Keefeand Back Ewlngwill be the 

battery tor the Giants m the panic against the Browns at the Haight- 
Btreet Grounds to-morrow. With Swing behind the bat it Is doubt- 
ful if even Latham will be able to steal a base tO-moiTOW. Buck's 
reputation is greatly due to bis ability to throw rapidly and accu- 
rately to bases. Through Ward's superior knowledge ol the rules 

he deceived Fonts last Sunday, and obtained Aral base when he 

might easily have been put out. it Is probable that the Giants and 

Browns will play two more Sunday games alter to-morrow, to 
those an opportunity who. ;! s v . t, have been unable to attend bi 
of the weather. It is also among the possibilities that thev will play 
a Saturday afternoon game for the pleasure of those who cannot at- 
tend the Monday games. It is probable thai Bardie and Borchera 

will be one of the batteries for the Greenhood A Morana next season. 
Five of the Los Angeles Club are below and fourare here sight- 
seeing. Crane will probably pitch in a game for the New Yorks be- 
fore he returns home. The New York Club signed him at the end "i 

last season, and he has not a* yet played in a game with t hem. 

The Emcrsons would like to get into the Amateur California League. 

The Operatic Concert Benefit tendered to Miss Alice Canning, pu- 
pil of Mine. Inez Fabbri Miiller, which took place-at Saratoga Ball, 
Friday evening. Jan. i:sth. was decidedly interesting, Miss t 'anning 
possesses three qualities which will insure her future success: A line 
stage presence, a powerful, well-trained voice, and a remarkable 
amount of self-possession. She was very ably assisted by the follow- 
ing artists; Professor and Mrs. Edward Heifn burger, pianists; Miss 
Mary Hagan, soprano ; Herr Professor Charles (iofirie, violinist, and 
the old favorite, Jacob Miiller. Professor and Mrs. Heimburger de- 
lighted everybody with their extremely artistic playing. Jacob 
Miiller created great enthusiasm with his magnificent voice. Pro- 
fessor Charles GofFrie made a most decided impression with Musin's 
Valae de ( 'oncert. Great disappointment was felt because Mme. Pab- 
bri did not appear. 

Oakland Riding Academy.— Mr. E. S. Shattuck has opened an 
elegant riding school on the corner of Eighth and Harrison streets, 
which he intends making, in every respect, a school where ladles can 

fo, with perfect safety, without an escort, to learn the beautiful art — 
Itjuestrianism. Oakland has long felt the need of such an Academy, 
and no doubt the ladies and gentlemen will grasp this splendid op- 

fortunity. Mr. Shattuck has engaged as instructor Prof. 1\ II, De 
'ue, who enjoys a renowned reputation in that line. The opening 
night, which took place Tuesday evening, January 17th, was a social 
as well as an artistic success, proving that the school will be attended 
by the "creme de la creme" of Oakland. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FOR BOYS 

1 ST. "MATTHEW'S HALL, J 

£ sjL.nr :m:a.t:eo, cal. » 

gCLASSICAL SCHOOL,| 

S! Under Military Discipline. 

S Special Attention aud Advantages for Pitting Boys for a Scien- ^ 
tiflc or Classical Course. S 

= REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, Principal. 

6- r 3 

TWENTY-TWO YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL WORK ! 

EASTER TERM WILL OPEN JANUARY 8th. 

"PBOGEEIIIEKTTJE" 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR BOTH SEXES, 

1707 Powell Street, Between Union and Filbert. 

SPECIAL FRENCH CLASS daily, from 3:30 to 5 p. m. Courses of French 
aud English 011 Monday. Wednesday and Friday, from ft to 9:30 p. M. 

Circulars giving a full history of the Institute, its objects aud terms, will 
be sent to any address upon application. 

[Dec. 10. XAVIKR MEFRET, Director. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

922 POST STREET. 
French German and English Day aud Boarding School for Young Ladies 
and Children. KINDERGARTEN. 

MME. B. ZISKA, A. M.,j Prl ncinals 
Sept. 10.] MISS MARY LAKE, ( " lncl P a ' s - 



MME. WALDO-COHEN, 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 
1215 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



MRS. ADA CLARK'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

211 Sutter Street * ho, ° Kearn» 

PRIVATE LESSONS AND PRIVATE GLASSES A SPECIALTY. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



MAG'S LETTER. 

Dear N. L.: "Is it cold enough for you?" has been takin' the 
place o' " Happy New Year " as the salutation o' the day, 'n really 'n 
truly I reckon the person don't live 't 'd say " no." My! ain't my 
fingers been just like small icebergs. A gentleman from the Eastwas 
up to dinner with us the other eveniu', 'n you just oughter a heard 
him kind o' pokin 1 fun at us 'Frisco girls, savin' 't we didn't under- 
stand high science or we'd be the sweetest things out on a cold day; 
but instead o' bein' all snugly wrapped up, 'n a pretty, cosey face 
peepin' out o' f ur *n so forth, the girls (to him) was a real pitiful 
sight, with their slender riggers 'n tailor-made costooras, shiverin', 
with only a tippet 'n muff at the most as protection against the cold. 
I chipped in 'n said 't we warn't accustomed to considerin' ourselves 
in Siberia in the glorious climate o' California. 

But my gracious, talk about fun! If this ain't been the jolliest sea- 
son 't ever was you can pass in your checks. Only think o' there 
bein' four real big balls ahead, 'n Nettie's weddin', 'n that Art Asso- 
ciation masquerade, 'n oh! no end o' little affairs. (For goodness 
sake, don't go 'n say 't Mag meant social flirtations by that phrase. 
What I mean is small fandangoes, theatre parties 'n such). Every 
one is rushin' things to get all the dancin' in before Lent, but if 
things go on 's they're beginnin', folks is goin' to have penance sure 
enough in listenin* to the music o' the offertory to the Cath'lic church, 
from what Can't-I-bellow calls ambitious amatoors. I wonder if the 
music minister's dark-tressed affinity is musical too. -What a chance 
for him in gettiu' up another oratorio racket like long ago. I forget 
if I sort o' hinted to you 't the departure Washin'tonwards about 
holiday time of a distinguished gentleman had a suspicious look. 
Well, it appears 't his Frisco weakness fared elegantly in consequence 
o' the trip. She's East herself, you know, 'n op'ra boxes was again 
placed at her disposal ('n relations goin' too), 'n folks in Gotham 
seem to size it up 's likely to be for keeps 't the gentleman is playin'. 
He'd be goin' to the opposite extreme in his taste o' second choice, 
wouldn't he? But la me, p'raps you don't know who I'm talkin 
about, 'cause I ain't mentioned no names, but I reckon you 'n soci- 
ety generally are cute enough to guess. Eh? Warn't that a awful 
pity, the burnin' up o' the Mau house? Every one 's wonderin' what 
on top o' this earth the newly-married pair 's a goin' to do for a nest. 
Go to the other parents. I guess. " The loss o' one 's the gain o' the 
other," says the proverb, 'n you know they turn out real true some- 
times. There's one, though" 't slipped up, you bet, ; n that is, "Catch 
a Weasel asleep." Now, if all 'ts said is true, a real old Weasel be- 
longin' to the old boys' club was caught nappin' in good earnest o' 
late, 'n his fair friend got away with a pretty large-sized check while 
he was " under the influence." My! my! Why will the old fellahs 
never learn wisdom, 'n profit by the sad fate V several prom'nent 
citizens *t have gone before, 's the sayin' is. Speakin' o' foolish, real 
silly old boys, you should a seen one to the daisy party last week. If 
he didn't make a show o' hisself there I ain't got nothin' to say. The 
party aforesaid warn't a daisy one in slang terms, but was given by a 
young Marguerite, don't you see? The family spread 'emselves to have 
everythin' elegant, and one o' the rooms looked at one time for all 
the world like the swell booth to the late Cath'lic .Bazar— exactly the 
same folks to be seen, the high-toned Roman el'ment. (You fcnow 
ever since the old lady's pa found the path for 'em, the family's been 
toein' it right smart. 

But to return to the old boy with what us girls calls the sillies. He 
had caught on to a real sweet young girl, 'n was payin' her the most 
ridiculous old-fashioned style o' compliments right out loud. Every 
one near was a snickerin', 'n the poor girl looked most scared to 
death, till one o' the chaps with brass buttons came along 'n claimed 
his dance. Ned says 't the old man ,'s goin' to be the school-marms 
candidate for next President. Why ? 

Every one in society 's so awful glad 't that charmin' couple, the 
Colliers, 's got back from the East. She's just the nicest matron 't 
ever was, so real sweet and kind to the girls, wantin' 'em to have a 

food tim 5, 'n then whoever she takes under her wing like is sure to 
ave a good share o' Ed. Sheldon, 'cause he's always round in that 
set. Speakin' of Ed. always reminds me o' Al. It's to be hoped 't 
he (Al.) will give up weigh'in' the ducats against the merits o' his lady 
friends, now 't he's quit that line o' bizness (weighin', not ducats). 
Have you heard the last? A certain set o' the elite have determined 
upon havin' afternoon teas durin' Lent, but instead o' dancin' 'n sing- 
in' 'n so forth, they're to meetfor " moral and mental development." 
Now, did you ever! It appears 't a gentleman '11 be chosen from the 
comp'ny to read essays on the subject written by the ladies present, 
'n whichever gets the most applause is to win a prize. The old Judge 
says 't he'd like to hear what a well-known, fly dame has to say on 
the subject of development, 'cause she's a case of expansion if ever 
there was one (what on top o' this earth do you s'pose the old fellah's 
drivin' at?) I tell you, though, what was an eveuin' o' jov this week, 

n that was the first night o' the Carleton op'ra. Ned 'n me was ask- 
ed to join a party, 'n such a splitt'v supper as we had afterwards! It 
was a real pretty house 'n lots o* old boys to ogle the actresses. Cant- 
I-bellow 'n the Fat Dentist was buzzhV away together like fits. 
Nellie suggested 't they was gettin' up a scheme for transplantin' 
larynxes. The idea ! 1 reckon they'd find a slight difference between 
molars 'n vocal chords. Don't you? 

The Judge is awful disgusted 'cause Clara Belle 's got free. He 
says she'll be shootin' the old man certain now 't she's got the in- 
sanity dodge 's a sure thing, but I told him 't I reckon he's scared o' 
gettin' made a target for some feminine fingers his own self— (my 1 
warn't be mad though)— 'n that's what's the matter. But gracious 
me! here I've been goin' on like anythin' 'n I ain't said a word about 
the fun t Nellie 'n I had with Ed. Greenaway to the high tea, nor 
nothin about the fancy ball german. Oh, what a ball that was ! But 
sakes alive ! I'll have to tell you about it next time, 'cause I couldn't 
begin to say all 't it merits in one whole letter, let alone a piece o' 
one. One thing, though, you can bet, 'n that is 't Mag's costoom was 
the prettiest one m the room— now, I don't care if I do say it Every- 
one said so, 'n the old Judge actually told me 't I took the cake! 
think o the old Judge usin' slang in his admiration! George gave a 
real elegant dinner durin' the week to the folks 'twas a goin' to dance 
oneo the quadrilles. I warn't there, 's I belonged to another set 



but one o' the party told us next day up to lunch 't it was a sight to 
behold to see that slim , pale blonde bossin' things. (Ned says 't them 
fragile appearin' folks is awful full o' will power sometimes). One o' 
the sights o' the german itself was a couple 't got into what they 
thought was a snug corner, 'n the rapid manner in which they 
emerged from it. But I'll tell you the whole thing next week, 'n my ! 
such elegant favors 's we got. Ned said he wondered some girls 
hadn't chosen to go 's Cleopatra, 'cause Langtry 'n Potter is makin' 
her the talk o' the day; but the old Judge said 't he guessed shape 'd 
be the stumbling block there. Ain't he hateful? 

Speakin' about favors, they say 't the last assembly party o' the 
season is goin' to give the ladies cute little bottles o' Camelline. 
There's a notion for you, combinin' the useful 'n the ornamental. 
It's quite wonderful how lovely it makes one look, 'n the Tinklers' 
Club uses it exclusively for their hands to make 'em look white when 
they pick the mandolins 'n guitars. On dit, the same Club has offered 
to play a benefit for Fred Innes. I wonder if it's really true? Ain't 
it queer the way 't things go with a rush in this big village o' ours, 'n 
then all of a sudden they rush out o' sight 'n no one hears or sees 'em 
any more. Look, for instance, at the Fat Boy 'n his balloon adven- 
tures, 'n the lightnin' train, 'n Althea's alimony, 'n Henry Reding- 
ton's projected ladies' tailorin' establishment. Where are they all 
now? n echo answers "where?" From all accounts, the engage- 
ment 't I told you was likely to come off is to be announced before 
Easter, 'n the young couple go East to reside. 'Tain't so awful easy, 
though, to get to the top o' the swim "back East " (if what NeV 
Yorkers say is true) as it is in 'Frisco. Even Oddy Mills' aristocratic 
wife 'n his pa's coin could do no more 'n make his house-warmin' " a 
pleasant little affair." There's one thing, though, 't I call a real 
shame, 'n that is the fashion 't prevails in New York for real old men 
to lead the german ; 'n that brings me back to fancy dress once again, 
'n it's too bad 't I can't say more about it now, but " lack o' space," 
'n so forth 'n so on. 

But before I close let me tell you the old Judge's last riddle, which 
he asked us the other evenin'. Says he: " Which one o' the fairy 
tales o' our childhood does the walk of a certain military gentleman 
resemble? " I guessed " Puss in Boots " directly, but that warn't it. 
'Twas "Jack and the Beanstalk." La me! 

Well, till next time, ta-ta. Mag. 



" Ma," said Bobby, running into the house, " you said that if I did 
a real act of kindness this afternoon I could have a piece of pie, and 
I've just done it." " What was the act of kindness, Bobby ? " inquired 
his mother while he ate the pie. And Bobby replied between bites: 
"A cat came into our back yard and I didn't stone it; but instead I 
told it that Taber, of No. 8 Montgomery street, takes beautiful 
pictures." 

Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 

GRAND VIN d'AY 




GOLD LACK SEC! 

In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke &. Co., 



Jan. 21.] 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 



HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 
FEOM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



1'urter Grand Hotel. 



[Dec. 17. 



RAHTJEN'S COMPOSITION 



IRON AND WOODEN SHIP BOTTOMS, 

Which protects them against Rust and Fouling, keeping their surface 
smooth and slippery for one year. 

E. W. TRAVERS, Agent, 

De <=- 8-1 No. TO Market Street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 21, : 



-AN FRANCISCO m:\vs LETTER 



11 



GOTHAM QOE 

NYw York City. January 10. 1888 Tin- •■ Town," u the Man 

. maiden, who has been Aright i • ,. now Indicated New York 

i her » nv 1 | e addieaaetp, i- i ■ all outward ap] earai oes in the 

magnao! state which follows upon the excitement ol the holiday*, 

The rush l- orer- though all tin- shop* are advertising the after* the- 

holiday .' titu cents on the dollar. Boone ol these bargains 

inderluJ enough. 1 saw some pretty little fancy velvets, tine 

stripes) and larger checks on a satin eround, forth* modest earn ol 

twent) -five oenta a fard, and though there ia not an unsalted newness 

about fanev vrivri.it Is, like the Ban Kranciaco Tfvoli, for example, 

quite good enough. Perhaps, Indeed it is, a little better than one has 

any right to expert for twanty-flve Dents. 

There has not been a change of programme at any of the theatres 
for an incalculable period— or to -peak less elaborately and with mure 
truih --not since the year 1887. I will except the Academy of Music, 
where KJralfj '- New Ballet has followed in hoi and somewhat Inde- 
cent baste upon the severer strength of the Booth -Barret t-Bacon - 
Shaks pea re- Donnelly drama. The Bullet is giddy, light, leggy and 
diverting, hi* called " Masulm.ortbe NigW owl,*' ami Nym Orinkle 
aa} - it owes all its charm to color and rhythmic action, and to decor- 
ate.! human beings without personality. Agile and clever trickster- 
also lend an interest to it. This is a broad and comprehensive de- 
scription of Kiraliy on all occasion-. " Ma/.ulm " OUght to have 
ated holiday week proper. It is ;i Diagnifloent blaze of color, a 
bouquet Of pretty women who dance w. II and dress better. It is 
almost as splendid a BCenJO effort a- Irvine's Faust — though in a 

widely different spirit. At the Fifth Avenue Theatre Mansfield still 
terrifies and entrances hi- shuddering audiences with his fiendishly 

realistic dual character of " Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," and if his 
play hear- only a sketchy resemblance to Stevenson's story, at least, 
nobody can deny that it photograph^ its most hideous features. 

At the Lyceum that play of The Wife, which ought certainly to 
have been called The aiubarul, ambles comfortably into its third 
month. Pretty little Lyceum Theatre ! Quite the daintiest nook in 
which Dame Pleasure has ever installed herself! A soft blending of 
all the tender wood tints, with a warm ground tone in its deep acajou 
carpeting, lighter plush coverings, hangings which lead, through 
yellowish tones, to oak, and deepen again into cedar-red, and the 
-oil, dull. WOOd-tOned walls, with the chastfl frieze, which is as un- 
mistakably a creation of the talented Tiffany, OB if his name were 
scribbled between the scrolls. The same unerring taste dictated the 
indefinite and restful curtain, which is «.i some soft wood-brown stuff, 
which yet has here a thread of pink, ami there uf blue, and yet again 
of gold and of gray, and falling much after the fashion of the satin 
draperies of the Baldwin stage, gradually and delicately covering the 
stage pictures, tor every Lyceum stage setting constitutes a picture, 
and does not inflict a sudden slap upon the imagination, such as one 
i- conscious of suffering, par example on the sudden descent of the 
■ Spanish Mail " at the Fifth Avenue, and of which there is a suffi- 
ciently-spirited reproduction in San Francisco. The boxes at the 
Lyceum are the most admirably placed of any in New York, as they, 
a- far as possible, face the stage, and the stage is plainly to be seen 
from anyone of the five chairs which each DQX holds,' so the occu- 
pant- an- not forced to brave the battery of the eyes of the entire 
audience in order to view a scant portion of the performance. The 
wood-paneling and screens of the boxes are as beautiful as the rest of 
the theatre, but the crowning triumph of the bouse is the exquisitely 
pretty arrangement of the electric lights, which are great pearl- 
shaped, opal drops of mellow light, held each in a network of metal, 
and grouped all together, like the cluster brooch of some Titaness, 
in the middle of the dome. One is suspended by chains of coins, on 
either side of the stage, above the boxes, and the light thrown on the 
body of the house by electric burners, entirely concealed behind con- 
vex medallions of stained glass, which are set, also jewel-like, at reg- 
ular intervals along the upper dress-circle guard. 

Mrs. Xstor's death has, of course, cast a gloom over society, but 
the shadow can scarce be said to appear upon its face. The Charity 
Ball was more brilliant, if anything, than that of last year, and the 
ranks of belledom are largely "augmented by the pretty debutantes of 
'Stf-BS. Of course such an introduction to society as was accorded 
little Miss Morris— who is not a beauty— has been retailed and detail- 
ed all over the country, and yet scarce two accounts of this ultra- 
gorgeous affair agreed as to what Morris jx're had to pay for the en- 
tire Delmonico establishment, so the lively public imagination is left 
to run up and down the scale between $10,000 and $20,000. But that 
all the fashionable world was at Delmonico'a to welcome the new re- 
cruit on the eventful night that Miss Morris wore an imported cos- 
tume of white tulle and carried (?) sixty bouquets is unanimously 
conceded by the ten thousand and ten truthful chroniclers. 

A New York paper, in speaking of another debutante— Miss Elsie 
Mitchell— attributes her really wonderful grace of carriage and the 
symmetry of her slender, but" exquisitely rounded figure, to her de- 
votion J;o the art of fencing, in which she has become an expert, and 
hints darkly at some charming, but utterly indescribable, costume in 
which she wields the fashionaole weapon. "Miss Mitchell," drones 
the Daper in question, " is never seen without flowers. Sometimes it 
is a fragrant cluster of Parma violets at the throat of her favorite 
tailor-mad-^ costume; sometimes a spray of the drooping, graceful 
Lily of the Valley; sometimes a single deep-hearted Jacqueminot; 
sometimes a cluster of velvety pansies." 

The most beautiful Bud of the dozen, Miss Carrie Webb, a niece of 
Dr. lie ward Webb who married Miss Vanderbilt, and who modestly 
greeted society, not at Delmonico's, but at the tea given her by her 
mamma, began her social career with a crushing disappoint- 
ment, and has retired temporarily from the brilliant scene on crutch- 
es. The first mishap was maddening — that bitterest of trials, a 
heartless, conscienceless dressmaker, who failed to keep to the letter 
of her bond and forced Miss Webb into the great world in one of last 
year's gowns. Who can paint the scene! Who can truthfully 
describe the wailing and gnashing of teeth on this occasion, which 
promised to be the brightest girlhood can offer — girlhood, at least, 
which is a joyous part of gay and charming Gotham's upper tendom. 
And now a more serious accident. A severe injury to the knee has 



imprisoned all the bright drew i. o to Speak, in plaster of Parte, 
and the tair dream, r rep re Li [he daticea which -he expected to 

and remains at homo with the cuu iouioeai thai tor one brlel - 

mcnt.an.l in her old clothes (though old ta only used as an ad 
ot cimipariM.il). she was pronounced the prettiest Bod of the 

A. n. 

The W, ak.r Sex 

strengthened by tin- u r i» r . k. v Plaree'i " Favorite Pre 

script loo, winch onres .ill gemeoti, and rives toue t<> ' 

tea. Sold bj duigglits. 

Do Not Think for a Moment 
tlnit catarrh will in time wear out, Dn theory li false, Uentrytotx 

II because it would be pleasant if true, t.ut It Is n..i. as all know n I 

acute attack of cold In the head remain unsubdued, it It Mi 
develop Into catarrh. Vim .' elf ot the cold and avoid all chances 

urn by using Dr. Sage's Catarrh Remedy. If already afflicted rid 

ill of this troublesome disease si lily i.v the same moans. At all 

druggists. 

Advice to Consumptives. 
On the appearance of the Bret symptoms, u general debility, loss of appe- 
lit.-, pallor, chilly sensations, followed by night-sweats and cough, prompt 
measures of relief should be taken. Consumption i- Bcrofoloui di i 
the lunge; therefore use the greal antl-acrofula <>r blood-parlfler ami 
strength-restorer, Dr. Pierce's H Golden Medical Discovery." Bupei 
cod-liver oil as a nutritive, and unsurpassed as ■ pectoral, Tor weal 
Bptttlog of blood ami kindred affections, It has no equal, Bold by drug- 
gists. For it. Pierce's treatise on cnusu motion, send in cents in stamps. 
world's Dispensary Medical association, titiS Main street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



"Young man," said the minister, impressively, " 1 can see you as 
you sat at the gaming-table, with a deep red Hush on yourface." 
" Excuse me, but you're wrong about that deep red flush. Hill Jen 
kins had it in his mind." — Washington Oritio. 

b.a.:i_t:k:s. 



WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,000,000 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentino, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldrldge, Wm. Norrls, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [Aug. 6. 

. HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated . November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER ... .President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW MTES. IDec. 81. 

""NEVADA WAREHOUSFAND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS..., PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for 8an Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest ou the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Mouey advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses. 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 FINE ST., San FranciBco, Cal. [Nov. 19 

~ BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCOT" ~ 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr . . . Assistant Cashier 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; 8T. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
In Loudon— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sous. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, aud Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Fraukfort-on-the-Mam, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yo kohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE 1,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virgima, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR. JAS. C. FLOOD, JNO. W. MAOKAY, 

R. H. FOLLIS, JOHN BIGELOW. 

" ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
•WH OLESALE D E ALERS LN FURS. 

p- • . r- j- r% ( Conceded by best judges far supe- 

f. r»lirvCO r VTr3 I IPX/ -rior to any imported, but without ad- 
L.bll|JOC l_AL! O. U I J < ditlon of Brandy. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



THE SMALL -POX EPIDEMIC. 

Though appearances may prove deceitful, and there may be 
more trouble ahead, the indications at this present time of writing 
are that the small-pox epidemic is subsiding. Precautions, however, 
must not be relaxed on that account. There is enough of the disease 
spread over a widely extended area of the cit3 r to cause a great deal 
of solicitude yet. Whilst all possible diligence is used to stamp out the 
disease already here, the important fact ought not to be lost sight of 
that there is" almost certainly more of it on the way from China. 
The last three steamers have brought importations of it, and there 
is every reason to believe that those which follow for some time to 
come may be equally unfortunate. It is evident from what has 
already happened that the disease is particularly virulent at the ports 
of departure. It is at the Golden Gate and not on the crowded streets 
of this great city that the small-pox ought to be fought. The fight 
there should be rigid, thorough and effective. It is easier and 
cheaper to keep it out than it is to stamp it out. Itcosts a great deal, 
in more ways than one, to deal with an actual outbreak. The city is 
learning that just now. The checks upon expenditure which are 
proper in ordinary times, have necessarily had to be abandoned in 
the presence of the epidemic, and the drains upon the treasury 
are consequently considerable at this time. The vastly increased 
cost of running the Health Department is the most obvious and 
most direct expense of the epidemic, but it is not the greatest or 
most important loss. First and last there will be not a few lives sacri- 
ficed that ought to be deemed beyond price. The Pesthouse is crowd- 
ed with patients who, at best, will havesuffered loss of time and busi- 
ness. Then we have yet to learn the effect of small-pox being declared 
epidemic in San Francisco upon our commercial relations with other 
countries. Such a declaration usually involves serious consequences. 
It is generally accepted abroad as a "notice to quarantine all vessels 
coming from the infected port. Travelers may be relied upon to 
select some other route than that via San Francisco. The stream of 
travel from the Australian Colonies that comes this way will be 
pretty sure to be interrupted, and the interruption will be likely to 
be continued beyond the period of actual danger. For every reason, 
then, we cannot too strenuously fight to keep epidemic disease out. 
The trouble is that there is no quarantine worthy of the name at this 
port. There ought to be, as there is at New York and at every other 
great seaport with which we are acquainted, a properly equipped 
quarantine station at which passengers might be landed and treated 
with a minimum of inconvenience until all danger be surely passed 
away. Until such a station is supplied San Francisco will always be 
exceptionally liable to loss and danger by reason of the incoming of 
contagious diseases. If Cholera ever obtains an entrance into this 
country, the chances are as nine to one that it will get in by way of 
San Francisco. Our close contiguity to the Asiatic breeding grounds 
is an ever-present source of anxiety. Meanwhile, and as a purely 
temporary measure, a large hulk or vessel ought to be obtained and 
maintained in a high state of cleanliness for the reception of passen- 
gers on ships inflicted with small-pox. We are pleased to notice that 
the Occidental and Oriental Company has obtained the old ferry- 
boat Capital for quarantine purposes, and that the Gaelic's passen- 
gers will be transferred to her. This is the most effective step yet 
taken to fight the epidemic. 



THE DOLLAR LIMIT EPIDEMIC. 
A good, -wholesome attack of smallpox in epidemic form is not a 
matter to be deprecated. In some aspects it is a distinctly good 
thing. If it result in closing the public schools, for example, the 
teachers could be docked of their pay, and thus the municipal expend- 
iture kept comfortably within the dollar limit. Then, the folks who 
die are mostly of the poorer sort, who pay little in taxes, and are, 
therefore, tax-eaters, brigands and sciolists. Many of them had in- 
civism already, and their room rather than their company will facili- 
tate our living up to the dollar limit. Most of them are buried at the 
cost of relatives, so that this expense makes no serious inroad on the 
dollar limit. Most of those who die, anyhow, are murdered by the 
insufficient and parsimonious arrangements imposed by the dollar 
limit, and which, therefore, serves them right. It certainly does 
serve them right, for it is likely that most of them on some occasion 
voted for a dollar limit ; and those who voted against it ought to have 
gone to Los Angeles or San Diego. They have no one to blame but 
themselves for running the chances of smallpox and a dollar limit. 
Moreover, they had all escaped the dollar limit diphtheria, which was 
epidemic just before the smallpox, so theV cannot pretend to St. Peter 
that they had no warning in time to cleanse their souls and put on it 
a wedding garment. We have no doubt now that could Brother 
Fitch's immortal part be beheld, it would be found clothed in a shin- 
ing night-shirt of dazzling whiteness, all spun, sewn, buttoned and 
laundried strictly within a dollar limit. We should be pained to see 
a gentlemanly ghost of Mr. Pickering's years in that scant array, but 
cannot doubt he would redeem the dear old song, 

"I wore my bridal robe, and I rivaled its whiteness." 
Either that robe would come within the dollar limit, or Mr. Picker- 
ing would wear none, regardless of exposure or the police. And he 
would be right. Police at a dollar limit can be disregarded with im- 
punity. Meantime, the dollar limit smallpox is making it merry for 
the living, and populous for the dead, and funny for the undertaker, 
who is the only man that really laughs. 



Judge Toohy having knocked the bottom out of the existing enact- 
ment tor the suppression of gambling, Chief Crowley has had a new 
ordinance drafted and submitted for approval to the Board of Super- 
visors. Before its final passage it should receive an addition provid- 
ing that the police official who fails to raid a gambling den upon his 
attention being called to its existence, shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor. Unless the police can be made to do their duty, laws 
against gambling are but instruments for the -extortion of largess. 
The pool sellers, faro dealers and tan gamesters all play because they 
pay— the police. 



THE FUTURE OF CHINATOWN. 

The question as to what is to be done with Chinatown will have to 
be taken up and determined sooner or later, and the sooner the bet- 
ter. The longer it is tolerated, the wider will its area become and the 
denser and more objectionable its population. When the Board of 
Health, during Mayor Kalloch's time, officially declared it a public 
nuisance that must be abated, the Board was undoubtedly on the 
right track, but unfortunately the administration of that period was 
so profoundly distrusted by the property-owning class of our citizens 
that no proposals emanating from it, however wise or salutary, stood 
the slightest chance of adoption. That Chinatown is, in every sense 
of the word, a nuisance is admitted by Eastern visitors, who marvel 
that it is tolerated for one unnecessary hour. That it is within the 
legal competency of the city, in the exercise of its health and police 
powers, to order its abatement does not admit of a doubt. If the 
sanitary officials, in view of the known and probable facts, were to 
declare it "a nuisance" in the sense contemplated by law, they would 
only be acting in the strict line of their duty, and that declaration 
once made, they would be justified in suppressing the nuisance, at 
whatever cost. They could order the tenements vacated, and pre- 
vent their being re-occupied until the Chinese chose to locate them- 
selves at the Protrero or some out-of-the-way portion of the city. It 
may be said that such action would be harsh towards the owners of 
Chinatown property, and perhaps it would, but have not those own- 
ers done much to justify, if not demand, such apparent harshness? 
They have found profit in permitting a condition of things that no 
great city should tolerate. If San Francisco had been under the 
operations of a building act, as it ought to have been years ago, the 
shanties of Chinatown would have long since been replaced by credit- 
able and respectable erections. The owners of property, for "the past 
two decades or more, have drawn a maximum of rent for a minimum 
of house accommodation, and the dwellings in that locality have paid 
for themselves several times over. There cannot, therefore, now be 
any great hardship in compelling the property owners to conform to 
the wants and progress of the city. Their property stands a blight 
and a curse to the city. It is particularly injurious to that fair por- 
tion of San Francisco which lies north and west. There is no more 
desirable residence sites than those which look out towards North 
Beach and the Golden Gate, but the necessity of passing through 
Chinatown to reach them acts as a blight to their progress. If no 
other way out of the difficulty can be found, Chinatown should be 
condemned, its value assessed and paid, and a new, more healthful 
and more sightly condition of things substituted for what is now a 
scandal and a shame. Chinatown must go. 



COLONEL FINNECxASS. 
The astute and gallant Colonel Finnegass is at last having the 
even tenor of his quiet life ruthlessly disturbed. The dispatches 
from Washington are coming along freighted down with allegations 
that must be very disquieting to his placid and innocent soul. It is 
not everybody who knows the ever bright and smiling Colonel, but 
he is a man worth knowing for all that. Not many men of his im- 

Eortance would be content to be so humble and retiring. Modest as 
e always seems to be, he is vet a very Atlas with a world of respon- 
sibility upon his shoulders. He is charged with the obligation of see- 
ing that the hundred millions or more of revenue which Uncle Sam 
derives from the Pacific Coast is all faithfully and honestly collected. 
He also keeps a keen eye on the people's money, and pounces upon 
any of it that is counterfeit. These are important functions to be 
vested in one man who is without a superior officer to dictate to him, 
or an inferior to watch him. The Colonel plays a lone hand, with no- 
body nearer than Washington to report to. He dresses in "home 
spun," never takes warm or exciting drinks, and so bent is he upon 
" keeping cool " that he takes a salt-water plunge at North Beach 
every day of his life. If he has any of the weaknesses or 
vices of the period the fact has escaped the argus eyes of the 
envious. His salary is but $1,800 a year, yet it is said that he is 
as rich as if he had all these years been drawing that amount every 
month. The telegrams from Washington say that he has long been 
in with the opium ring, and if he has he has certainly been in with a 
better thing than a gold mine. It is said that one of his confederates 
has given him away, which, if true, is very unkind on the part of the 
confederate. Ex-detective officer Metzler tells a very circumstantial 
story of how the Colonel once got $2,500 for releasing a distillery he 
had seized, but then Metzler may be jealous and may not be truthful. 
We know a man who says he paid the Colonel a large sum to in- 
fluence a juryman to stand out for an acquittal in a certain case, but 
then the reputation of the man who says so for truth and veracity 
is not good, and he may belying; yet it is certain that one man did 
hang the jury, and that he had no motive or cause for doing so ex- 
cept coin. It is said that the Colonel's position around the Federal 
Courts is an anomalous one, and that what he does not know about 
how juries are fixed is nothing to nobody. He has always been a 
kind of half brother to Captain Lees and a second cousin to Counselor 
Clarke, and partakes somewhat of the nature of both. He is now un- 
der fire, but if his wit has not forsaken him, we predict for him a safe 
deliverance out of all his troubles. 



Congressman Morrow has asked that the appropriation for a post- 
office site in San Francisco be increased from $350,000 to $850,000. It 
is a big jump all at once, but there is no profit in being over-modest 
in these matters; besides.it is a splendid national advertisement of 
real estate values in San Francisco. When Congressmen reach that 
bill they will realize, if they never did before, that climate as well as 
land sells hereabouts. San Francisco ought to have been given a new 
postoffice years ago. 



Additional life-saving stations are at last to be provided on this 
coast. Lieutenant McLellan is now in San Francisco with authority 
to establish four new stations. One of these will be located at Point 
Reyes, another just outside of Fort Point, another near the Mile 
Rocks off Point Lobos, and the fourth at a location five miles south 
of the present life-saving station near the Cliff House Rocks. To 
Congressman Morrow great credit is due for pushing this matter. 



Jan. 21, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



18 



TOWN CRIER. 

•Hear Ihe Crier!" "What the devil art thouT" 
*Ouo that will play the devil, >ir. with you." 



Monsieur Jules Tn vernier and Mr Joe Strong, after packing up 
their affects at Honolulu and making even preparation for it voyage 
to Ban Pram isco, the borne ol their affections, vera rudely informed 
by an officer ol Kalakua's Government thai they would not beper- 
iiiitted i" depart until they squared up h few trilling debts which were 
-till outstanding. The Qui very properh remarks that this is an 
outrage on the boasted liberty of the person of the American citizen, 
and persists that it should be made an international affair. 1 consider 
it a piece of ingratitude on King David's part to detain those two 
estimable gentlemen and excellent artists, who have done so much 
towards advertising his old volcano, and banana groves, and palms, 
and other things, merely because of a few vulgar obligations to 
butchers, bakers, and the like I sincerely hope that we will Bend a 
war vessel down to those haughty islanders and rescue Joe and Jules. 
It would be a truly grand spectacle to watch the artists step on board 
the gang-plank, waving their unreceipted hills in proud defiance in 
the teeth o( those tyrannical missionary tradesmen, scornfully shriek- 
ing to the milkman that he was a patron of the pump, taunting the 
baker with being an alum fiend, and yelling over the bristling cannon 
tn the saloon-keeper that his Bourbon was kerosene in disguise. It 
would be the making of Jules and Joe. They would be the Mason 
and Slidell of this period, and a panorama painted by the oppressed 
artists, showing them speeding down to the wharves, wrapped in the 
American Hag, with the missionaries in hot pursuit, would bring in 
shekels enough to make them independent for life. 

A little dingy restaurant, a Lounge, some creaking chairs. 

A faded painting on the wall of " Love in Early Spring," 
Yet in this musty, ancient den I've oft entombed my cares, 

And now its grins interior some pleasant musings bring. 
This carved initial on the door was sculptured years ago, 

I'.y one who long has worn the matron'-- wedding ring; 
1 close my eyes, her features on my musing fancy grow, 

Again I hear her liquid laugh , again I hear her sing. 
Though grandly sentimental, and prone to passion's rhymes, 

To sighs, and* lofty pledges forever to be true, 
That lovely sculptor ne'er forgot, in those dear vanished times, 

Her appetite — she doted most on mutton-kidney stew. 
I meet her walking with her brood, tall sons and daughters fair, 

A plump and portly matron (she always loved to dine), 
And when I raise my hat she hows with quite a friendly air— 

I can't believe those haughty lips were ever pressed to mine. 
And yet T cannot help but think, when falls the noisy rain, 

(Our prowlings and our ("castings were done in wintry weather), 
This staid and wealthy lady's mind may travel back again 

To that dingy little restaurant where we've been blest together. 
Alas for love platonic, for such a love was ours, 

Its motto is inconstancy, tla ever on the wing, 
And the only compensation in pondering on those hours. 

Is, though* its life was Jitful, it left behind no sting. 

I admire the almost paternal care with which the dailies note the 
disappearance of the wayward youth, and the maiden who, discount- 
ing the Spring, goes off for a quiet racket. Especially the maiden. 
She is worth from a half to a column, all the time, and is invariably 
described as •' pretty and interesting." Indeed, some reporters take 
a still higher Bight and call her " ingenue." but few city editors per- 
mit this license. Witness the case of the blonde little Oakland type- 
writer, who did the disappearing act this week, but bobbed up serene- 
ly, not from the bay, nor from the gilded barem of the perjured vil- 
lain . but from a quiet lodging, where she had been recuperating from 
the fatigues of type-writing. Now, this was the Chronicle's missing 
girl, and the Examiner, of course, pooh-poohed it. and decried this 
habit of keeping a tag, as it were, on all the belles of the suburban 
towns and the reigning beauties of that district lying south of Market 
street. But wait until it is the Examiner's innings, and the " Mon- 
arch" scores a missing boy or girl. The Chronicle will treat the waif 
with scorn, and would not return him or her to the mourning parent, 
even though they should wander into the basement to count the 
pulsations of the lightning press. 

The young blood of the period considers a knowledge of wines in- 
dispensable to his reputation. Never willing to admit that he does 
not know everything that is to be learned about those important 
adjuncts to human comfort, he blunders along in a calvish way, 
painting his nose with infantile energy, and prattling of the great 
vintages of the European cellars. When young Tom Verdant drank 
for the first time, the other day, a glass of champagne frappe, his 
palate was tickled with a new sensation, but he sipped his glass with 
an ease that betokened familiarity with that cooling beverage. He 
caught the name, and before he went home that evening, sauntered 
into the importer who furnishes his wealthy papa, and with a grand 
air ordered a basket of champagne frappet sent to those bachelor 
apartments where he entertains his male and sometimes his female 
friends. The sagacious salesman never smiled, but quietly entered 
the order and permitted the customer's acquisitions of further knowl- 
edge to rest with Providence. 

The brass band has become as essential to an out-door real estate 
sale as the auctioneer, and no mass meeting is complete without its 
cheering influence. So at Biggs, whose enterprising citizens want 
the Methodists to establish a college there, the other day a band 
played profane airs, and a covey of parsons made religious speeches. 
This was an adroit concession* to the materialistic tendencies of the 
times, a warrant that when the collegians found the droning of the 
good missionaries too oppressive, they might drink an antidote in 
the ungodliness of the cornet and the amorous wheezings of the 
trombone. 



I h.ive discovers 
Inthesenseof relationship to a duffer, bul a buffer it, 

sens,.. M,e buffer's ,,ual-lie.,!i,. n-are , in the lir-t place, th< 

the gab, backed up with BU nre tad a man Invites ati Inliuentlol 

o dinner, or one of his wife 1 relations, or any Individual who 
Lsto him personally objectionable. He mini have the buffer to do 
: hi::, to come between and heai the shock ol mutual aversions 
ti h ■■!! the conversation i m whi n the danger signals art 
out on the track, in return ror the i 

dined and well wined, and as in a certaii ta are he is the n 

ton "i family seen ts, he ha* an acknowledged claim up. 
bans account. I know a mat. who would as soon Btand I 
the muzzle of the sunset gun at the Presidio, with the cannoneer 
apoul io pull the lanyard i tfite-a tete dinner with 

his wife without the presence ol a trusty and well-tried buffer. 

At early morn, with anxious mien, 

Regardless -a the quarai 

Outside the County Joil is -cm 

Fair Zeising with her glycerine. 
Thi- ts her dail;. ■ 

And paring up and pacing down. 

With now a smile, and now a frown, 
DOC. Bowers lakes the air. 

Then Zeising climbs the stairs and taps, 

And Jaibr lingers hear- her raps. 
And drops the wire s< 

She grasps the Doctor'a clammy hand, 

And passes him his favorite brand 
Of unctious glycerine. 
Clara Belle, the fair pistoleuse, got off easily. Her pearl-handled 
dagger and her silver-mounted pistol have been returned to her, and 
she is once more, in the eyes of the law, a free woman. Nut s,, with 
Seneca Swalm. I have an idea that it will go hard with that fascinat- 
ing dude. The sins of Clara and the rest of them will be visited on 
his pompadour head. I imagine Mr. Swalm's chief mortification 
must lie in the reflection that be was s (l near getting away with the 
boodle and yet did not succeed. He had a nice, comfortable stake 
about his clothes to start him in business if that intrusive officer had 
not pinned him so unceremoniously. The world is full of Clara 
Belles, and the experienced Seneca, with his snug capital, might have 
profitably established himself in any Eastern city in the confiding 
friend business. He is a beautiful warning to young men who think 
that plowing up the credulity of wutueii for a golden harvest is the 
smoothest road to a pleasant livelihood. 

A great deal of unmerited censure has been wasted on the driver 
of the Pesthouse wagon who took a patient for a little trip to (he 
Cliff House before consigning him to that melancholy plague spot. 
The intentions of that man were excellent, ami but for his too liberal 
patronage of the wayside places, he and the infected one might have 
made a night of it, sipping the foaming wine of Eastern France and 
listening to the sonorous music of the seals. By the pricking pustule, 
I should like to have seen that lover of roysterers drop in upon one 
of those nice wine parties, when Mr. Churohpillar was clinking 
glasses with Miss Sarah Sealskin, and swearing she should have a 
new piano next morning. Veuve Vaccine would be the favorite 
brand for the next day. 

The cold snap is over, 
The maid hugs her lover, 
Nor shrinks when his nose meets her ear hung with gold ; 
There linger no longer 
Excuses for stronger 
And hotter potations to keep out the cold. 
Now every glib wizard 
Declares that this blizzard. 
Which scared all our tourists, has vanished for aye; 
A tramp wind from Wyoming, 
Which started off roaming, 
And forgetting its guide-book got lost on the way. 

It looks as if we were never to bear the end of the opiu m-smug 
gling scandal. From the mysterious hints thrown out by the dailies 
it seems to me that every prominent man in the city is an accom- 
plice of jolly old Ilarkins in working the fascinating dope among our 
Chinese friends, and the sallow hoodlum, and the short-haired chip- 
pie. It would not astonish one if Collector Ilager were discovered 
with a chunk of opium in his vest pocket, and a box of the stuff 
were seized among the mails, addressed to Mr. Cleveland, with the 
compliments of Mr. James Tucker. 

I observe that the Bulletin, with a nice sense of the fitness of 
things, classes in an advertising column Dr. C. C. O'Donnell and 
Dr. Li-Po-Tai cheek by jowl. Li-Po-Tai is on the odd and O'Don- 
nell on the even side of the street, and the afflicted can take their 
choice, though I question if the Chinaman's dessicated roaches and 

Sickled lizzards are not more effective specifics for disease than the 
'Donnell nostrums, saturated with that interminable tongue sauce. 

The Smith-Kilrain hippodrome has brought forth good fruits. 
Mr. Fox has quarreled with his editors and artists, and incontinently 
fired them out. The next lot may be less_ indecent, but that leading 
limner whose ingenuity in making all his female figures present a 
lavish display of leg, will find it difficult to get another place where 
his amiable talents will have such a field for coquetting with the nude 
in distorted art. 

Mr. Howells has been writing facetiously about the proposed 
method of dispatching criminals by electricity. By the ghost of Cat- 
craft! many a discriminating criminal would court the brutality of 
the gallows in preference to the slow, lingering death the majority of 
that same author's novels invites. 

The fashion reporters have neglected to state that one of the neat- 
est things now in vogue is an embroidered satin badge for the arm of 
husband, brother or'sweetheart, bearing the legend in yellow letters, 
" Beware of the scab." 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



THE REAL PROPERTY MARKET. 

pjal estate operators report an encouraging prospect, but they 
a i.o complain that free dealings are considerably interfered with by 
ne difficulties which buyers experience in arranging for money. The 
latter commodity is still reported as scarce, although rates have not 
been raised. The commercial banks are specially mentioned as being 
heavily drawn upon, and so accommodations cannot he had as easily 
as heretofore. Of course, with those who buy for cash, this state of 
things makes no difference, but with the speculative branch of the 
market it does. Matters are now so shaping themselves that con- 
siderable speculation in real estate is likely to ensue, if the specu- 
lators could count upon financial assistance in their ventures. Here- 
tofore only choice property has been accepted as collateral, and out- 
side lands were only taken in large parcels. The banks,_of course, 
still adhere to this rule. Private lenders, however, no longer shut 
their eyes to the fact that the latter class of property has a certain 
settled value, and that no risks are assumed in advancing money up- 
on within this limit. 

The condition of the market is improving from day to day, and had 
not the cold weather interfered somewhat, the week would, no doubt, 
have shown a fair list of sales. An unfortunate event was the failure 
* of the company having the contract to fill up Kentucky street to 
i South San Francisco. Great expectations were harbored concerning 
the effects of the completion of this enterprise upon the real estate of 
the Protrero and South San Francisco, for it is an open secret that a 
. cable road would at once have been built to these* points upon the 
; completion of the street. Kow the whole enterprise stands seemingly 
postponed indefinitely, and under the legal complications which are 
certain to arise, judging by past experiences, there is good reason to 
doubt if the work will ever be finished. The difficulty lies in the fact 
that inasmuch as the work is being done under the old Vrooman act, 
making the collection of the assessment precede the awarding of the 
contract, the money to do the work has been collected from the 
property liable therefor. This turns out to be insufficient to remuner- 
ate the contracting company. There being no provision of law by 
which anv additional money can be raised, it follows that the only 
recourse to compel the completion of the work is against the bonds- 
men of the contracting company if the latter abandons the work. 
That, of course, is a slow and very uncertain process. Meanwhile 
the sum of nearly $200,000. collected from the property owners for 
the purpose of paying for the work, will remain idle in the vaults of 
the city' treasury. South San Francisco and Protrero property was 
just beginning to move, and it is much feared that this untoward 
event will check the growing activity. 

The announcements in last weeks issue of the contemplated re- 
moval of two banks to Market street has revived speculation on the 
question whether or not California street is likely to lose the distinc- 
tion of being the financial headquarters. It would seem to look that 
way just at present. Sansomeand Montgomery streets, on the other 
hand, are held to be benefitted by the changes. 

Last week's business has been of the customary order. The only 
feature it presents is a continuation of the inquiry after lots south of 
the Park by the speculative element. Lots with frontages as small 
as 25 feet find purchasers. What the prices paid are may be gath- 
ered from the following sales made last week : 82 :lixl00 on the south 
side of J street, 82:0 feet east of Twelfth avenue, $1,100: 125x120 on 
the east side of Twelfth avenue, 100 feet south of J street, $1,150; 
25xliiO on the south side of J street, 82:0 east of Twelfth street, $300; 
57:0x100 on the southeast corner of Thirteenth avenue and M street, 
$775; 110x25 on the south side of R street, 78:4 west of Nineteenth 
avenue, $250; and 125x240 on the northwest corner of L street and 
Ninth avenue, $4,000. These are sales ot land south of the Park. 
Values north of that resort are supposed to be higher. Here are a 
few samples: 25x120 on the west side of Eleventh avenue, 275 feet 
south of California street, $900; 26:8x100 on the south side of Point 
Lobos avenue, 80 feet west of Seventh avenue, $900; 108:3x120 on 
the northwest corner of C street and Tenth avenue $2,500. Quite a 
fair trade has been done in both classes of property. 

In the Western Addition the demand is light. This is not the time 
of the year when this section of the city receives the attention of buy- 
ers looking for homes, and as for the speculative element it is on the 
lookout fur large unimproved parcels only, which are getting quite 
scarce in this locality. The only class of property for which there is 
a demand is improved lots, but* in such case the improvement must 
be the latest. New houses, built after the most modern style, if lo- 
cated in fairly eligible neighborhoods, do not have to wait long for 
b lyers. Among the sales were: 25x137:0 on the north side of Hayes 
street, 102:0 feet west from Devisadero street, $7,800: 50x137:6 on the 
south side of Fell street, 106:3 west of Devisadero, $3,050; 08:4x127:8 
on the south side of Clay street, 200:3 feet east of Walnut; 82:0x60 on 
the southwest corner of Buchanan and Oak streets; 25x137:6 on the 
south side of McAllister street, 212:6 feet west of Gough, $5,000; 25x 
L06:3 on the west side of Baker street, 125 feet south of California, 
$5,750; and 25:10x120 on the north side of Post, 128:9 feet west of 
Octa via, $4,000. 

There is not much life in Mission real estate ;just now, a thaw is 
evidently wanted here also. Late notable sales include 30x85 on the 
southwest corner of Twenty-third and Howard streets; 50x08:9 on 
the west side of Prosper street, 132:6 feet north of Seventeenth street; 
50x115 on the north side of Henry street, 130 feet west of Sanchez, 
$4,510; 80x114 on tbe north side of Twenty-sixth street, 240 feet east 
of Diamond, and 50x114 on the north side of Twenty-fourth street, 
west of Diamond. In the central portion of the city, north of 
Market street, there have been several transactions of some magni- 
tude. These are: 75x137:0 on the northeast corner of Clay and 
Leavenworth streets. $0,050; 20x89:6 on the south side of Ellis street. 
75 feet west of Powell, $!t,400, and 50x137:0 on the north side of Sut- 
ter street, 87:0 feet east of Tavlor, $19,000. In the business centre 
there was sold 47:10x137:0 on the west side of Davis street, 43:10 feet 
north of Clay, for $20,000. 

South of Market the following sales may be mentioned: 35x137:0 
on the north side of Folsom street, 101 fee't east of Eleventh street; 
25x90 on the north side of Mission street, 125 feet east of Fifth street; 



20x57:6 on the east side of Fourth street, 20 feet south of Folsom, 
$5,000. 

The leading transaction in North Beach property was the pur- 
chase of lots 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 of block 2, bounded by Jefferson. Hyde, 
Beach and Leavenworth streets, for $30,000, by a syndicate repre- 
senting a new gas company. The projectors are now " wrestling " 
with fhe Supervisors, an amusement which is expensive. 

1,000 Different Kinds 
Of useful Christmas presents for $5 and upward. Come and see for 
yourself. Chadbourne's, 741, 743 and 745 Market street. 

BTTSIiETESS RESUMED. 



We take pleasure in stating that we have this 
day resumed business as usual, at San Fran- 
cisco, and at our branches at Los Angeles, 
Fresno and Santa Clara. 

GEO. W. MEADE & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 18, 1888. 



[Jan. 21. 



1ST O T_i O IE. 

San Francisco, January 1, 1888. 
Mr. Richard Delafield has this day retired from 
our house in San Francisco and New York, and 
will hereafter act for us and sign as our attorney 
in New York; and Messrs. Delafield, Morgan, 
Kissell & Co. will represent us in the Eastern 
portion of the United States and Canada. Mr. 
Thomas B. MeGovern will sign for us as attorney 
in Chicago. 
Jan. 7. WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 

FILLMORE TRACT. 



The FILLMORE TRACT, situated about THREE MILES easterly from 
San Jose, containing 

800 ACRES, 

Has been subdivided, as per map on file in our office, iu tracts of from 7 
to 40 Acres, and placed in our hands 

FOR SALE! 

Prices range from $100 per acre and upwards, according to location. 

TERMS— 25 per cent. Cash; 25 per cent, additional within 60 days, and 
the remainder on or before two years, at 8 percent, per annum. 

MONTGOMERY, REA & CO., 

(INCORPORATED) 

Real Estate Agents, 

Nov. 26.] No. 7 West Santa Clara Street, San Jose. 



SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal. 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 

PIANOS. [Oct. 8. 

DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 

J. COOPER, 

iMiiEiE^aiEai^isrT tailoe. 



24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building, 



[Dec. 17. 



HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 
Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 
Counterfeits and Imitations. 
41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. April 17. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



SAN FKANCI8C0 NKWs LETTER. 



17 



OBITUARY. 

Mr. F. Smith. -The death of this gentleman removed from the 
field of human activities one of the oldest and raoal popular hotel 
Iters on the Pacific Coast. The deceased \\;i- fifty-two yean o! 
id having, daring hi.- long career, managed a number of houses 
of entertainment- -among them Piedmont Springs and a prominent 
bole) In -he was necessarily brought into contact with a 

great number of people^ and the general regrei with which the tidings 
of bis death waa [earned is significant "i his personal amiability. The 
ed bad been ailing for some time and had moved to San Ber- 
nardino County, where he died. 

Mr. Samuel Ralston. It would be difficult to conceive of a more 
painful incident than the untimely death o( this young geutleman; 
a painfulneaa which la accentuated and emphasised by a recollection 
of the tragi"' clrcumstancea which Burronnded the death of his father. 
Th«- deceased waa born in California -even and twenty years ago, 
and, consequently, was little more than on the threshold ol matured 
life at the time of his death. Alining his associates, and friends he 
waa regarded as a quiet, amiable gentleman, whose ambitions in life 
were domestic and social, ami before whom lava long, prosperous 
and happy career. 

Dr. J. L. Meares.— This well-known member of the medical pro- 
m died al hifl home in this city on the 13th instant, after an ill- 
ness which, while subject to varying degrees of ucuteness, extended 
over a considerable period of time. The deceased was born in North 
Carolina sixty-four years ago, and came to this coast while still a 
young man. Formerly he enjoyed a large and lucrative practice, hut 
lor many vears (.;tst he confined his exertions to the discharge of the 
duties of Health Officer for this city. 

Mrs. F. M. Kreling.— This estimable ladv died at her residence in 
this city on Saturday last, after a short illness of only four days. 
The deceased was the mother of the hireling brothers, who are well 
known in this community as men of character and resources. In the 
domestic and social life which surrounded her the deceased possessed 
the respect and confidence of all with whom she came in contact. 
Her bereaved family has the sympathy of u large circle of friends. 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 



The Bankers' and Merchants' Mutual Life Association, one of 
California's moat prominent and popular institutions, held its An- 
nual Meeting last week, and re-elected the former Board of Directors. 
1'nder the old management, the association has had a most prosper- 
ous career, and having in the conduct of its affairs exercised the most 
Conservative principles they have kept the ratio of death losses far 
below the Experience Tables of Mortality. Under the present man- 
agement, the association is destined to be one of the largest in the 
I nited States. We understand, authoratively, that agencies are be- 
ing formed in nearly all the Eastern and Western States. The offi- 
cers and board of directors are composed of gentlemen prominent in 
business Circles. Alex. Badlam is President and Director; Gen. W. 
H. Brown. Vice-President and Director: Hichard K. Allen, General 
Manager and Director; Jos. D. Redding, Counsel; II. 8. Sanders, 
Secretary; Henrv F. Band, Actuary; Dr. Wm. P. Sprague, Medical 
Director; Tbos. K. Hayes, of Main & Winchester, Director, and H. 
S. Sanders, Director. 



Messrs. Easton, Eldridge & Co. announce that they have been 
instructed by Messrs. S. &G. Gump to offer for sale by public auc- 
tion, at the rooms of the Art Association on Tuesday evening, Janu- 
uary Mist, ami Wednesday evening, February 1st, a grand collection 
of French and German Oil Paintings, French Bronzes and Italian 
Marble Busts. The collection constitutes one of the most superb- 
groups of high art ever seen in San Francisco. It will be on exhibi- 
tion at the Art Association's rooms from next Wednesday up to the 
date of the sale. 

The Annual Statement of the State Investment and Insurance 
Company has just been made public, and it shows that under the 
energetic yet careful management of its present officers, the Com- 
pany has enjoyed a most successful year's business. Its gross earn- 
ings were $239,704.02, and its expenses and losses $2Wi,441.61, thus 
leaving a net surplus of $23,263.31. Among the '"expenses," however, 
there is included the dividends which were paid during the year and 
which amounted to $18,017. The Company makes a very healthy 
showing. 

The San Francisco Gaslight Company held its annual meeting 
this week. With the exception of James M. Donahue, who replaces 
P. J. Donahue, and D. T. Murphy, who replaces J. B. Randol, the 
old Directors were re-elected, and they in turn re-elected the old 
officers. The balance-sheet showed that the company's operations 
during the year had been very successful. Some improvements to 
the machinery at the company's Potrero works will largely improve 
its facilities for supplying the public during the coming season. 

The first yearly statement of the California National Bank of San 
Francisco has been issued, and constitutes a .showing of which the 
officers who have charge of the institution may well be proud. The 
deposits and cash assets of the bank are phenomenally large when 
compared with its capital, a fact which speaks volumes for the confi- 
dence which is reposed in its management. The fact that $10,000 was 
passed to the surplus fund shows that the year was a profitable one. 

The Annual Meeting of the California Insurance Company, which 
took place on Monday last, resulted in the re-election of the old offi- 
cers and directors. The balance sheet submitted showed that the 
underwriting operations of the company for the past year had been 
exceedingly profitable. The usual quarterly dividend of three per 
cent, was declared. 

The American Sugar Refining Company held its annual meet- 
ing on Monday last. The balance-sheet presented was a most en- 
couraging one, as, notwithstanding the low prices which have pre- 
vailed throughout the year, a dividend of six per cent, (amounting 
to $60,000j was declared, and a surplus of $250, 000 carried forward. 



Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Ii hereby given that * special mei Hog ol toe Mookbolder* of the 
Commonwealth Consolidate | M trporallon organised 

under and by \ in ( the lawn of tin.* si«u- ol cuiiforiiin, na» been called 

end will be held al tti poratton, 809 Ifontaomerj 

room ■<-, In the < mty of San Francinc te, ou 

Saturday, the 28lh day ol January. 1888, at the hour ol 2 o'clock P. M., 

For tin.- purpose ol considering au ■ tber or aol the action 

ol the hour. I of Directors ■ ill >u lu purchasing for said cor 

on that certain mining claim situated in Tuacarora Mining Dbtrlct 

Count) ol Elko, Btate oi Nevada, known as the Nina mining claim, shall be 

: aud approved by Bald stockholders, nud for tin- purpose «>f . 
eiing and determining « nether the action ol the Board "f Director! ,.f tin- 
corporation la selling to North Commonwealth M 

i aJIforula, nil thai certain 

ground situated in Kik«. Cmuhiv, state ..( Nevada, doner! I 
follow*, Eo 

All those portions of the lands embraced within the limits of Nina and 
Ail Alone mining claims, lu i uscarora Mlulug District, Klko County, Btate 
of Nevada, bounded aud described as follows, to wlti Beginning al posl 
number three B) as laid down and det>l ■■■■■!■ I States Survey 

of lot number forty-six [46] lu towuidilp number forts [40) north, reuse 
nfty-ouf (51] east, dSount Diablo base and meridlau, said Burvey belug the 
BUrvey of the ground of the Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Con 
thence running according to the trn.- meridian, magnetic variation 
seventeen and one-half (IT 1 ..) degrees east, north thirty-one (81) degrees 
fifteen (16) minutes, easl eight hundred and twenty-Hi thence 

Booth thirty-tbr e S3) degrees thirty (3U) minutes, east five hundred and 
thirty (680) feet; thence south thirty one (3D degrees fifteen (15) mli 
west mx hundred tCOO) feet; thence north fifty. orty-flve 

<i"m minutes, west four hundred and fifty-eight (468) feet; thence south 
fifty-seven (57) degrees forty five {4$) minutes, weal thence 

north thirty-one (811 degrees fifteen (15) minutes, <-ast forty-four (44) feet to 
the place of beginning, 

And in selling to Del Mont.; Mining Company, a corporation organised 
under the laws of the State of California, the following described I 
ground, to wit: All that certain mining ground situate, lying and being lu 
the Tuacarora Mlulug District, lu the County of Elko. State ol Nevada, and 
described as follows, to wit: All that portion of the laud embraced within 
the limits of the two mining claims in said district known as the Nina Htnl 
Tip-Top claims aud locations, lying north and west of the tine drawn 
through post number two (2) and posl number three (8), as laid down aud 
designated upon United States survey of lot number forty-six (46) in town- 
ship forty (40) north, range fifty-one (51) eaut, Mount Diablo base aud meri- 
dian, said survey being the survey ol the ground of the Commonwealth 



Cm i.-nli dated Mining Company, shall be ratified aud confirmed by the mi id 
stockholders. 

Dated Sau Francisco, January 10, 1888. 

Bv order of the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Consolidated 
Mining Company. [Jau. 14.| liKNKY DEAS, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The Regular Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held ut the office of the Company, room No. 8, 
327 Pine street, San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 31 st day of January. 1 888. at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M„ 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday. January 28th, 1888, at 12 
O'clock M. JOHN CROCKETT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 3'27 Pine street, Sau Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 21. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consolidated 
Mining Company, for the election of a Board of Trustees or Directors to 
serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction oi such other business 
as may come before the meeting, will be held on 

Wednesday, January 25. 1888, at half-past one o'clock in (he afternoon, 
At the office of the Company, room No, 23, Nevada Block, No. 30a Montgom- 
ery street, San Francisco, Cal. Transfer books will close on Saturday, 
January H, 1888, at 12 o'clock M. 

Jan. 14. J A. H. FISH, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Manhattan Silver Mining Company. 
The Regular Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the Manhattan 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 8, 
No. 327 Pine street, Sau Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 1 st day of February, 1 888, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meetiui: Transfer Books will close ou Monday, January 30th, at 3 o'clock 
meeting .iiuus w jQnN rKOCK ,, :TT| 8ecretapy# 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine Street, Sau Francisco, California. [Jan. 21. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby giveu, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 16th day of December. 18S7, an assessment (No. 3) of Fifty (501 Oeuta 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the Ollice of the 
Company, room 52, Nevada Block, No. SOU Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. . ,■ 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-fourth Day of January, 1888, will be Delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction ; aud unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on THURSDAY, the sixteenth day of February, 1888, to 
pay 'the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of D.reciom ^ ^^ 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. fDec. 17. 



w~ , • p , rv i Of moat delicate ilavor, aud the 

tchpse Lxtra Dry i ■^uMJBsr" prodvlced * 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



I 



"BIZ." 



The weather of late seems to have frozen out the energy of all 
classes of the community, not only upon the Pacific Coast, but 
throughout the entire length and breadth of this continent. 

Our stocks of staple goods, wares and merchandise have of late 
been greatly depleted by the increased requirements of the people 
flocking to this coast for settlement, coupled by the detention of a 
vast number of freight-ladened cars destined to this State, there 
being, it is stated, more than 3,000 cars switched off along the various 
trunk lines, loaded with all kinds of merchandise consigned to this 
city, which serves to still further reduce stocks. These cars were 
switched off in order to accommodate the rush of passengers, and 
before the lines could be cleared, snows upon the mountains required 
all the available locomotives to run their snow plows; and since then 
other extraordinary events have transpired to prevent their being 
transferred back to" the regular mail and passenger service. Thus it 
is that the freight trains have been forced out and off the trunk lines, 
to the serious detriment of our merchants. 

The present stock of Coffee is very light, pending arrivals of the 
new crop of Central American, which is our main reliance. The 
market, however, lacks animation. Dealers are not inclined to stock 
up freely at current prices. 

The market for Hawaiian Rice is strong, while the demand for 
Chinese descriptions is less urgent than customary. Salmon stocks 
are light and holders are firm in their demands. Codfish, on the 
contrary, is very plentiful, but with a good inquiry for that which is 
suited to supply the Australian market. Better prices may be looked 
for ere long, as all other kinds of cured fish are scarce and high. 

The Raisin market is firm, with small stocks yet remaining in the 
State. A syndicate purchase in New York of 30,000 boxes Lyon three 
crown brand California Raisins is announced, thus giving additional 
strength to the local market. The local market for other kinds of 
dried fruits is dull, although the stock of choice varieties is quite 
moderate for the season. Canned Vegetables are more in demand, 
by reason of the cold weather, which has nipped our garden supplies 
of fresh Vegetables. It is said, that the new crop is killed and that 
there will be little or no fresh Vegetables for about four months. 
Salted Meats and Lard are held higher by reason of enhanced freights 
from our sources of supply Eastward. 

The stock of both raw and refined Sugars has been suffered to run 
very low. On the 15th inst. they were said to be nearly exhausted, 
and the two large refineries fearful of being obliged to shut down for 
want of stock. There are ample supplies of Manila Sugar en route 
that ought to be here. The story has gone out that the long existing 
warfare between our local refineries is likely to be terminated and that 
in future they will work more in harmony. 

Coal dealers have taken advantage of the cold snap and have put 
up prices amazingly, although there is in reality no scarcity. The 
favorite Coal here for family use is the Wellington, the cost price of 
which in British Columbia is $i per ton, duty 75c, freigbt and charges 
not exceeding $5 per ton, and yet the price to dealers is $12, and to 
consumers $20 per ton. Seattle is quoted at $10; Australian, $9.50; 
West Hartley, $10; Scotch Splint, $10 per ton. 

Lumber is in active demand, and so also are Bricks, Cement, Lime, 
etc. The Building demand is very urgent all over the State. 

Kerosene and all other Oils are the turn dearer. The market for 
Paints is very strong and the demand quite urgent. 

Brooms and Wooden ware are. in active demand, and the shortage 
in the Broom Corn crop at the East has its effect here. 

The Hardware trade is active at full rates. Straw Paper is higher. 
Metals are in good request, prices strong and the demand quite active. 

Salt is in good request, with an increasing demand. 

Tobacco, both leaf and manufactured, is firm. 

The Treasure shipment hence to Hongkong per Oceanic, on 11th 
inst., was $162,097; to Penang, $64,000; to Bombay, $123,000; and to 
Hiogo, $95,000. 

The Treasure shipment to Honolulu per Mariposa, hence January 
15th, was $50,200. 

The market for Wheat and Flour is quiet. The former we quote at 
$1 37J£@$1 40 per ctl., and the latter at $4@$4 50 for Extras and $3@ 
$3 50 for Superfine. 

We note the following Freight Engagements : Ger. iron ship Rich- 
ard Wagner, 2,020 tons, Wheat to Liverpool direct, 21s., joint ac- 
count; Br. iron ship Panmure, 1,505 tons, Wheat to Cork, 25s., direct 
port 22s. (id. ; Br. iron ship Craigburn, 1,997 tons, Wheat to Cork, 24s. 
Gd., direct port 22s. ; ship Bohemia, 1,5*3 tons, Wheat to Cork, Havre 
or Antwerp, 24s.; Br. iron ship Angerona, 1,227 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
26s. Gd.; Br. iron bk. Charles Cotesworth, 1,031 tons, Wheat or Flour 
to Cork, 27s. 6d. ; Br. iron bk. Golden Gate, 899 tons, Flour to Cork, 
27s. 6d. ; Br. iron ship Carnarvonshire, 1,227 tons, Wheat to Cork, 25s. 
Od., Liverpool direct 23s. (a re-charter); Br. iron bk. Dunnerdale, 
Wheat to Cork, 25s. Od., Liverpool direct 23s. (re-charter); Br. iron 
bk. Thos. S. Stowe, 080 tons, loads Flour at Astoria for Cork, £2 
(chartered prior to arrival): Br. iron ship Drumcraig, 1,919 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, private; Nor. bktne. Eidsvoid, 273 tons, Flour to 
Hongkong, private; Br. iron ship Siren, 1,482 tons, Lumber from 
Burrard Inlet to Sydney, £2 Is. 3d.; Br. iron bk. Brussels, 953 tons, 
Merchandise to Havre, private; bk. Gen. Fairchild, 1,350 tons, Coal 
from Departure Bay to this port; ship Highland Light, 1,205 tons, 
Coal from Seattle to this port; ship Wm. H. Smith, 1,908 tons, now 
at this port, proceeds to Sydney to load a return cargo of Coal; Br. 
iron ship Great Victoria,' 2,208 tons, Coal from Nanaimo to San 
Pedro; rfor, bk. Europa, 1,111 tons, Coal from Nanaimo to this 
port. 

Eastbound overland freight for the month of December aggregated 
24,748,590 lbs. Of this San Francisco contributed 14,989,520 lbs. ; Los 
Angeles, 2,394,870 lbs. ; Colton, 2,550,440 lbs. ; San Jose, 2,133,380 lbs. ; 
Sacramento, 1,018,590 lbs.; Oakland, 082,160 lbs.; Stockton, 343.200 
lbs.; Marysville, 50,430 lbs. Raisins and Canned Goods, Vegetables, 
Wheat and Barley were the leading items. 

The latest improved gold eye-glasses $4 to ?5, and superior lenses. 
Muller's Optical Depot. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 377 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Agents for Growers and Manufacturers, 

Charterers of Vessels for All Trades, 

Agents for the Mexican Phosphate and Sulphur Co.'s 
Products, 

And General Insurance Agents, 

Have correspondents in the chief Cities of the United States, Eu- 
rope, Australia, India, China and principal Islands of the Pacific, 
and attend to the Purchase of Goods and the Sale of California 
Products in those Countries. [jaa. 22. 



Wm. T, 
SHIPPING UNO 



Coleman & Co., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NEW YORK. 

— AGENCIES- 

Chicago: London: Astoria: 

91 niCHIClff AVE5UE, 4 Bishopsgate St. Within, Plavel's Whurf & Warehonse, 

T. B. McGovern, Eugene E. Jones, Jno. F. McGovern, 

Agent. Agent. Agent. 

New York City, Liverpool, Los Anqeles, 



71 Hudson Street. 



54 Drury Buildings. 



75 North Spring St. 



We have our Brokers in every commercial city of importance in the West- 
ern, Middle and Eastern States, and employ a large staff of traveling sales- 
men. We have the best facilities for the distribution of California Products 
East, aud give especial attention to 

Canned Goods, Raisins, Wines and Brandies, 
Borax, Barley, Canned Salmon, 

Salmon in Barrels, Mustard Seed, 

Dried Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, 
Lima and Small White Beans and Other Products. 
' [Feb. 26.1 



H. B Williams. 



A. CHESEBRO0GH. 



W. H. DlMOND 



WILLIAMS, DlMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, The Cuiiard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of 
Clippers," from New Y ork and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 

[Feb. 19,] 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 67, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet First and Serond, Sao Francisco. One Block from Palace Hotel, 

|B^- Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Kept at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

f!W Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

The " Standard " Machine-Loaded Shotaun Cartridges, under the 

Chamberlih Patents. 

C. WOOLRICH, 

Commission and Forwarding Agent, Mazatlan, Mexico. 

Agent for Pacific Mail S. S. Co., RoyalMail S. P. Co., The Marine Insurance 
Co. and Lloyds of Loudon. 

A residence of 34 years on the west coast of Mexico enables me to offer 
useful services and large experience to intending investors and owners of 
properties for the purchase and sales of mines, lauds, etc., in Sinaloa and 
adjoining States. 

Merchandise and machinery forwarded to the interior and all commission 
business transacted with care and punctuality. [Oct. 15. 



8. L. JONES. 



E. D. Jones. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 



207 and 209 California Street. 



| January 9. 



21, 188S. 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LETTER. 



I'.t 



NOTABILIA. 



Dullard: My frivml. Jinen, is ftboUl t>< !•*• m:irru*l; \vh;it would 
you suggest an a pr< ghUy: How high doyouwanl logo? 

Pullnrti Mooeyu do object, provided I cao Eire blm something 
nsafnl duablo. Brightly: Well, if youfMl Boreckli 

that* I would advise you to Bend him ■ ton of ooal and seventeen 
down bottles of Betoeada Mineral Water, it is the Queen ol all table 
..ml those who have used it are in doubts u i<> whelherils 
qualities a-* ■ beverage or aa ■ medicine are it> greataet recommenda- 
L. Caben & Son, No. 418 Sacramento street, are agents for it. 

Editor Morning Paper— " 1 seethe temperanoa bum Is exciting 
much interest. We are short ol editorial. Can*! you give as 
article upholding the movement and describing the vast benefits 
which would result to humanity from the removal ol the rum curse V " 
Bub-Editor— " I am afraid 1 rani <i.> the subject justice just now. 
it- past midnight and 1 have been writing solongtnat [*m complete- 
ly fagged out." Editor—* 1 WeU, let's go and get another nip. That'll 
brighten you up," —Omaha World. 

An exchange says: "There's no danger of the young man who 
striking for shorter hours." \\*hy should there 
\ voung man looking at " his girl striking Eor snorter hours " 
should be no more dangerous than the one who goes to see his girl 
painting ■ blue dog on a red plaque, while O. A. Hale<£ Co., Nos. 
Mo. 1 12 and 144 South First street, San .lose, are busy selling the best 
value in dry goods overseen in California. 

The Socialist who howN the loudest for a division of property is 
not the oiu- who gets the lowest wages. She vi ten refuses to go to 
Chicago to edit an Anarchist organ, because he is earning $75 a week 
in New York, whhh i- more than the conductors ol the Chicago sheet 
can afford to pay him. He should divide his (76 with his less fortu- 
nate brother .Socialist, who receives only (6 a week. 

—Norristown Herald. 

The man who plants a tree to raise wood for his own coffin has just 
died at Akron. Ohio, three years after the tree was cut down. It is 
Akronologica) fart, that this man has died somewhere annually dur- 
ing the past quarter of a century at least, and his widow has invaria- 
bly packed up her traps and coin*- to San Francisco, where delicious 
meals can always be obtained at the Original " Swain's Bakery," 
No. 218 >utter street. 

Broker (to seedy-looking fellow)— Great Heavens! is that you, 
Charlie? I thought yon were worth at least one hundred thousand 
dollars. Seedy Fellow (sorrowfully)— So I was: but a month ago I 
gave a banquet to some friends at the Extortion Hotel. B.— Well, 
what has that got to do with your looking so shabby? S. P.— Why, 
1 paid the bill. —Hotel Mail. 

An Indiana man jumped off a lightning express train as it flew past 
a way station, to meet a woman to whom he was engaged to be mar- 
ried. A few years hence he may be trying to catch a lightning ex- 
press train to get away from the same woman. But this alarming 
possibility does not deter White, No. 614 Commercial street, San 
Francisco, from continuing to sell beautiful Hats. 

Mrs. Hendricks (the landlady) — " You are not looking at all well 
this morning, Mr. Dumley. Have yon eaten anything, do you think, 
that distresses you?" Mr. Burnley (the boarder) — " No, "raa'am ; 1 
think it is something that I have not eaten that distresses me." 

— Harper's Bazar. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately 
after returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will 
be prevented. James G. Steele & Co.. 635 Market street. 

The man who bought a last year's almanac in preference to one 
for 1888 because he got it at less than half price, will be badly fooled 
when he goes fishing on several Saturdays during the year, thinking 
the day is Sunday. —Norristown Herald. 

It 'was the man who wrote his final testament on a piece of stove 
plate who had an iron will. And it was his wife who got her photo- 
graph taken at the Elite Gallery, 838 Market street, and so secured a 
beautiful picture. 

The man who makes your knuckles snap, 

And says " I'm glad to meet you," 
Is very frequently a chap 

Who'll readily forget you. — Oil City Derrick. 

Goto Swasey's Photograph Gallery, No. 26 Montgomery street, 
p. Lick House, S. F., for Instantaneous Photographs. Pacific Coast 
lews. Excellent Work. 

" Here," said the salesman, waving his hand, " is a full line of our 
celebrated spring beds." " Yes," replied Mrs. Malaprop; " they were 
very nice for the warm weather, but I want to see some of your Au- 
tumn beds." — Judge. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

There is hardly a day in the career of any business man which is 
not a read-letter day. — Whitehall Times. 

Fredericksburg Brewing Co. Gold Medal, 1887. First Prize 
Medal 1885 and 1886. 

The shoemaker must be a compromising character, for he's always 
ready to come to an understanding. — Whitehall Times. 

Wm. H. Keith & Co., West End Pharmacy, cor. McAllister and Fillmore. 

London has a hotel-keeper for Mayor. His hostelry might be call- 
ed a Mayor's Nest. N. B.— This ought to cause a horse laugh. 

H. W. Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, N. E. Cor. Taylor and Turk. 



op 

Vi 



AMERICAN BISCUIT CO., 

801-816 Battery Street, 
SAN FRANC /SCO. 



MAMKA.li i;k \N UNLIMITED VAKIKIVOP 

CRACKERS AND FANCY BISCUITS, 
Superior to auythint; ever offered f.>r iale In the Dolled statu. 



Sole Makers of the I CUbrated 

" s asr o "W f l j± iec e s ." 

Successors to the CALIFORNIA CRACKER CO. 



| Oct. 22. 



HOTEL WI1TDSOR, 

(late abmy and navy), 
Victoria Street, London, S. W. 



280 APARTMENTS. 

-E LZECTIR.X.C LIOH T:; 

T-u.rkisli a,n.d. S'wim.mini' Baths. 
Oct. 15.] J. R. CLEAVE, Manager. 



PARAISO SPRINGS! 

MONTEREY COUNTY, CAL.. 

THE C-A.K.XjSB^.ID OP AMEEICii.! 

NEW MANAGEMENT 1 NEW IMPROVEMENTS! 
The most Beautiful, most Invigorating, most Easy of Accessor all Min- 
eral Spring Resorts— 1,500 feet above the sea level. Take San Jose Cars, 
8:30 morning, and arrive at SpriDgs at dinner. 

J. G. FOSTER, Proprietor. 
ED. FOSTER. Asst. Manager. 



Telegraph, Express mid IYislMllU'es. 



[Feb. 10. 



ST. JA.MES HOTEL, 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 
TYLER BEACH, PROPRIETOR. 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all Modern Improvements. The 
rooms are large, airy, and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, 
next door to the Court House. No expense has been spared in making this 
a First-Class Hotel in every respect. 

AMERICAN PLAN. Rates, *2.00 to J2.50 per day. Special Prices by the 
Week or Mouth. Coach and Carriage at Depot on arrival of all Traius. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 
A Quiet House of Peculiar Excellence. 

ARMY AND NAVY HEADQUARTERS. 
Jan. 7.] WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

STEAM BOILERJNCRUSTATIONS. 

Old Scale Eemoved, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

Llewellyn Filter-Heater and Condenser! 

(Over 300 in Daily Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering tne Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 26 to 50 per cent. In the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 
330 Pine stre et, San Fran cisco, Cal. [Sept. 11. 

~ E. L. 6. STEELE & CO., 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO.), 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

—AGENTS— 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery. 



r* i' r" i r~i ( Sold at price of Imported Cham- 

Eclipse Extra Dry Ip^es, !«*,*. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

A Flash of Lightning.— During a hailstorm 
at Mors, in Denmark, a few days ago. a flash 
of forked lightning— the only one occurring— 
struck a farmhouse, and. having demolished 
the chimney-stack and made a wreck of the 
loft, descended into the living rooms on the 
ground floor below. Here its career appears 
to have been most extraordinary, all the plas- 
ter around doors and windows having been 
torn down, and the bed-curtains in the bed- 
rooms rent to pieces. An old Dutch clock was 
smashed into atoms, but a canary and cage 
hanging a few inches from it were quite unin- 
jured. The lightning also broke sixty win- 
dows and all the mirrors in the house. On 
leaving the rooms it passed clean through the 
door into the yard, where it killed a cat, two 
fowls and a pig, and then buried itself in the 
earth. In one of the rooms were two women, 
both of whom were struck to the ground, but 
neither was injured. — Public Opinion. 

Soaring Birds. — An interesting contribu- 
tion to the question of the soaring of birds was 
made recently by Professor W. P. Trowbridge 
to the American Academy of Sciences. It ap- 
pears that his son has discovered that birds 
of prey and some others have the power of 
locking together those parts of the wing hold- 
ing the extended feathers, so that the action 
of the air extends the elbow, and the wings 
can be kept in the position for an indefinite 
period without any expenditure of muscular 
exertion on the part of the bird. Professor 
Trowbridge expressed the opinion that it is pos- 
sible for a bird to sleep on the wing, and Pro- 
fessor J. S. Newberry safd that be once shot a 
bird which came slowly to the grou d with its 
wings extended, but quite dead. He believed 
the discovery of Mr. Trowbridge explained 
what he had "never previously been able to ac- 
count for. — English Mechanic. 

The Tubercle Baccillus. — In a communica- 
tion made to the Academie des Sciences by 
MM. Spillman and Hanshalter, and recorded 
in La Semaine MidicaU, the question of the 
spread of the tubercle bacillus by means of the 
common house fly is considered. The authors 
state that they have seen flies enter the spit- 
toons containing the sputum of phthiscal pa- 
tients; they were then caught and placed in a 
bell jar. On the following day several of these 
were dead. Examination of the abdominal 
contents and the excrement of these flies on 
the inside of the jar showed the presence of 
many tubercle bacilli. The authors point out 
wide dissemination of the disease which may 
take place in this way, and recommend as a 
preventive the employment of covers with a 
small opening. — Lancet. 

Sea-Sickness.— M. EmileOssian-Bonnet, in 
a note to the Paris Academy of Sciences, states 
that he has given antipyrin in sixty instances 
for the relief of sea-sickness, and with unfail- 
ing success. In most cases one gramme and 
a half is sufficient. 




ALLCOCKS POROUS PLASTERS 

have been in use for over thirty years. They 
have never failed to do all that is claimed for 
them, and can always be depended upon. 
Beware of imitations, and do not be de- 
ceived by misrepresentation. 

Ask for ALLCOCKS, and let no explana- 
tion or solicitation induce you to accept a 
substitute. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 
Trains Leave, and. are Due to Arrive at. 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



LEAVE 

(for) 


From January 1, 1888. 


[ ARRIVE 

i (from) 


8:00 a. 


- . Calistoga and Napa 


! 10:10a. 


4:00 p 




, 6:10 p. 


8:00 a. 


. Colfax via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


3:30 




11:10A. 


930 a. 




12:40 p. 


10:30 A. 




3:40 p. 


5:30 p. 


c. " " " c 


8:40 P. 


•6:00 A. 




•8:10 A. 


12:00 m. 




2:40 p. 


8:00 a. 


--lone via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


4:00 p. 


- . Knight's Landing . . 

-.Livermore aud Pleasanton. .. 


10:10 A. 


•4:30 p. 


•8:10 A. 


7:30a. 


L's Ausl's.Deraing.ElPasoAEast 


6:40 P. 


3:30 p. 


- . Los Angeles and ilojave 


11:10 A. 


t3:30p. 


. . Milton 


•5:40 p. 


7:00 a. 


Ogden and East, 


8:10 A. 


5:00 p. 




10:40 a. 


8:00 a. 


..Red Bluff via Marysville 


5:40 p. 


8:00 a. 




6:10 p. 
8:10 a. 


7:00 a. 


. -Sacramento via Beuicia 


8:O0a. 


via Benicia 


6:10 p. 


8:00 a. 


" via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


5:00 p. 


" via Benicia 


10:40 a. 


4:00 p. 


" via Benicia 


10:10 a. 


6:30 p. 


" via Benit ia ...... 


7:40 a. 


•1:00 p. 


. . Sacrameuto River Steamers 


♦6:00 a. 


8:00 a. 


.San Jose -- 


»3:40p. 


110:30 a. 


" 


J3:40 p. 


12:00 m. 




8:40 p. 
9:40 a. 


3:30 p. 




•4:30 p. 


" 




3:30 p. 


. . Santa Barbara 


11:10 a. 


8:00 a. 


..Stockton via Livermore 


5:40 p. 


3:30 p. 


" via Martinez 


11:10 a. 


6:30 p. 


.Siskiyou and Portland 


7:40 a. 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. rSaturdays excepted 
ISuudays only. 

c— Take ferry train and change cars at East Oak- 
land. 



Standard Time furnished by LICK OBSERVA 
TORY. 



A. N. TOWNE. 
Geu. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
From "SAM FBANCISCO," Daily. 

To EAST OAKLAND— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30. 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To 23d AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— Same as " To 
East Oakland " until 6:00 p. M-, inclusive, also 
at 7:00, 8:00 aud 10:00 p. M. 

To FRUIT VALE— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:3C 
3:80, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30. 6:00, 8:00, 10:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— "9:30, *2:00, 6:30, 
12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— *6:00, «6:30, 7:00. «7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00, 112:30, 
1:00, 11:30, 2:00, 12:30. 3:00, 3:30, 4:00.4:30,5:00,5" 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To BERKELEY— "6:00, *6:30. 7:00, "7:30. 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30,10:00, 110:30, 11:00, tll:30, 12:00,112:30, 
1:00, 11:30, 2:00, 12:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:80, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— Same as " To Berkeley.' 



To "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 

From FRUIT VALE— 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 8:50, 9:20, 
10:19, •2:49, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 8:50, 
10:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *5:21, 5:51, 
19:15, «2:38.*3:15. 

From 23d AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— 6:55, 7:25, 
7:55,8:25,8:55, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25,10:55, 11:25, 11:55, 
12:25, 12:55, 1:25, 1:55, 2:2o. 2:55. 3:25, 3:55, 4:25, 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, S:55, 10:53. 

From EAST OAKLAND— »5:30, 6:00,6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30. 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30. 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland— 7 minutes later 
than from East Oakland. 

From ALAMEDA— «5:25, 5:5.5, *6:25, 6:55, •7:25, 7:55 
•8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, }10:25, 10:55, 111:2.5, 1155, 
112:25,12:55, [1:25, 1:55, 12:25. 2:55,3:25, 3:55, 4:25 
4:5-5, 5:2.5, o:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 

FROM BERKELEY— '5:25, 5:55, '6:25, 6:55, *7:25, 
7:55, »S:25, 8:55. 9:25, 9:55, J10:25, 10:55, 111:25, 11:55, 
112:25, 12:55. 11:25, 1:55, 12:25, 2:55,3:25, 3r2>, 4:25, 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 



From WEST BERKELEY— Same as 

KELEY." 



From Ber- 



Creek Route. 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15,3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND 



-•6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 



•Sundays excepted. 



I Sundays only. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. 

South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 

Passenger Trains Leave Station Foot of Market 
Street, South Side, at: 

A'C\C\ a. M. (SUNDAYS ONLY) — Hunters' 

^.WW Traiu to SAN josE. stopping at all 
way stations— returning, arrive ia San Francisco 
at 7:20 p. m. 

Q-1R a.m. daily— For Alvarado. Newark. Cen- 
*-> ■ J-f treville, Alviso, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, 
Los Gatos, Wright's, Glenwood, Feltou, Boulder 
Creek, Big Trees, SANTA CRUZ and all wav sta- 
tions. 

Q'-fC"? p. m. (except Sundav), Express— Mt. 
£u . it» Eden, Alvarado, Newark, CeuterviUe, 
Alviso, Agnew's, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, New 
Almadeu, Los Gatos, aud all stations to SANTA 
CRUZ and Boulder Creek. 

A-IR P- m. daily— For SAN JOSE, Los Gatos 
~x . xzj an( j intermediate points. 
Cre EXCURSIONS to SANTA CRUZ and 
*+ ,<J BOULDER CREEK, on SATURDAYS aud 
SUNDAYS, to return ou MONDAY, inclusive. 

$1.75 to SANTA CLARA and SAN JOSE and re- 
turn. Sundays only. 

LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 

From San Francisco to Oakland and Alameda, 

Daily: 

.5:15— 56:45— $7:15— 7:45—8:15 — 8:45 — 9:15— 9:45— 

10:15—10:45—11:15—11:45 a. m.— 12:15— 12:45— 1 :15— 

1:45— 2:15— 2:45— 3:15— 3:45— 4:15— 4:45— 5:15— 5:45 — 

6:15—6:45—7:30—8:30—9:30—10:30—11:30 P. M. 

To San Francisco, Daily: 

From FOURTEENTH and FRANKLIN Streets, 
OAKLAND: $5:45— $6:15— $6:45— 7:15— 7:45— 8:15— . 
8:45-9:15— 9:45-10:15-10:45— 11:15-11:45 A.H. 12:15- ! 
12:45—1:15—1:45—2:15—2:45—3:15—3:45 — 1:15 — 1:45— 
5 :15-5 :45-6 :15— 6 :45-7 :30-8 :30-9 :30-10 :30-ll :30 P.M. 
To San Francisco. Daily: 

From HIGH STREET, ALAMEDA— $5:31— $6:01— 
$6 :31~7 :01-7 :31-8 :01-S :31— 9 :01— 9 :31— 10 :01— 10:31- 
11:01—11:31 a. m. 12:01—12:31 — 1:01—1:31—2:01— 
2 :31— 3 :01— 3 :31 — 4 :01— 4 :31— 5 :01— 5 :3l— 6 :01— 6 :31— 
7:16—8:16—9:16—10:16—11:16 p. M. 

{Sundays excepted. 



Ticket Offices, 613 MARKET STREET, under 
aud Hotel, aud Rotunda Baldwin Hotel, San 
ancisco. 

L. FILLMORE, W. T. FITZGERALD. 

Superintendent. G. F. and P. Agt. 

S. P. C. R'y Div. S. P. C- R'y Div. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 2 o'clock P. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. — 18SS.— From San Francisco, 

(Touching at Honolulu). 

Oceanic Wednesday. Jan. 11, 188S 

Gaelic Wednesday, Feb. 1, " 

Belgic Tuesday, Feb. 21, " 

San Pablo Tuesday, Mar. 13, ' ' 

Oceanic .To esday, April 3, " 

Gaelic Saturday. April 21, " 

Belgic Saturday May 12, " 

San Pablo Saturday, June 2, " 

Oceanic. Thursday, June 21, " 

Bound Trip Tickets at Reduced Bates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street, Union Block*, San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass- Agt 

G. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 7. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Folsom 
street. 

For Honolulu: 

S. S. Australia (3,000 tons) January 31, 18SS 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Without Change: 

The Spleudid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

ZealaNdia .. Thursday, February 9th, at 10 a. m 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails* 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKELSA BROS., 
Jan. 21.1 General Agents. 



Jim. 21, 1883. 



S \N FRANCISCO KEWS LETTER. 



WORLD. FLESH AND DEVIL 



A Wlitor ioNeW York Truth U 

sawn man mil into tin- lobby Of U 

RTenue hotel the other day, so drunk that he 
eoold nuoely keep his feet, end after looking 
roond tor ■ oonTenlent seat) espy an empty 
vblch hi- promptly seiied, and then be- 
gan totnake preparations for a night's rest 
He took ofl hu coat, his hat, and bla boots be- 
rare any one paid much attention to him, l»ut 
when in- bad taken off in- reel and nnbnttnn- 
ad Inn mspendera it began to .lawn on the gap- 
ing crowd that he wanted to undress bimaell 
and turn in for tin- night. It took two --tronK' 

m<!i !■• remove tin- new freak in the way of a 
tippler, who wa- subsequently senf in 
in- own hotel, iln' Buckingham, ami put tu 
bed. 1 found out afterwarda that his name 
■ r^v Caruths, anil that hi- occupation, 
when he i> at honie In the pleasant little city 
oj Columbus, <>hio, i- that ot teaching thegoa* 
1. in fait, 1 believe they look upon the 



1" 



everend Mr. Garntha a- ;t very exemplary 
man. but lie cert dnly doesn't beliave himseff 
when he come- t<> New York." 

It is rumored at Berlin and at Carl-rube 

that the approaching Visit of the Grand l»uke 
ami <iran<l Ducheas "i Baden to San Re mo is 
connected with a projected marriage between 
the Princess Victoria of Prussia, second daugh- 
ter of the Crown Prince of Germany, and her 
cousin. Prince Ludwjgof Baden, younger son 
of the Grand luik<-<.t Baden, and brother of 
the Crown Princes of Sweden. Prince Ludwig, 
who waa born in June 1865, is ten months old- 
er than the Princess. 

^^ A most important witness for the Crown 
at the Coolgreany trial at the last WickloW 
Assizes thus delivered himself to a counsel 
who had been cross-hackling him: "You've 
been badgering me for a full hour, sorr; but 
a cleverer man nor you was at me for two 
hours a short time ago. and he couUin't get the 
■ > of me, and what chance has the likes 
of you?" "Good God, man!" quoth the 
Judge, "do vou know that you are on your 
oath?" 

' It is officially announced that during 
last year German emigration showed a con- 
siderable falling off as compared with 1885, 
during which year 109,412 persons quitted the 
Fatherland. In 1H8U, however, there were 
only 79,875 emigrants. The only province in 
which there was an increase was Silesia, and 
the diminution was largest in Hanover and 
Pomerania. 

Washington people are beginning to 

doubt the stability of the Washington monu- 
ment. The edges of the big marble blocks 
at the base are splitting and crumbling, and 
the blocks themselves are seamed and cracked 
by the pressure of the shaft. Never before in 
the world's history, it is said, has a foundation 
of any kind had to support so great a pressure. 

— Russia is preparing, once more, to raise 
her import duties, especially on medicines, 
Mowers and plants. The duty on toys, too, is 
to be raised from forty-five to fifty"-five gold 
copeksper pound. The AVeuz Zeitang remarks 
that this is purely and simply intended to in- 
jure the export trade of Germany and Italy to 
Russia. 

The German translation of Zola's "La 

Terre," has been seized by the police at Ber- 
lin, Munich, Viennaand Dresden, and its sale 
is forbidden; but, oddly enough, the original 
French publication is still allowed to be offer- 
ed for sale. 

Twenty-two electric lights are completed 

and now running with great success on the 
Chicago River. They give great satisfaction 
and vessels can come into the city and pass 
through the bridges in safety on the darkest 
night. 

Over $67,000,000 was invested in new 

buildings in New York city last year — an in- 
crease ot near $9,000,000 over 1880 and $20,000,- 
000 over 1885. Building in Boston was quite 
as large as ever before. 

Even lilies droop and fade away. Just 

now Mrs. Langtry is confined to her liouse on 
Twenty-third street, suffering from a rather 
acute attack of rheumatism. 

— An Amati violin, which originally be- 
longed to Louis XIV., has recently been sold 
at Buda-Pesth for $3,500. 




TIME SCHEDULE. 
FftMciicer Truiin leave ami arrive at Passenger 
Depot (Town-einl Bt, bet : -<l HinI Ufa >tr- 

Franeta 



LBAVK 

t>. r. 



IN BFFBCT JAN. 1, 1888. 



I U'.kivi: 
I ft. P. 



Cemetery end San Mateo . . >| 2:30 p. 



f: i"i 


i I 


.. I" i. 


8:30a. 




•8:00 a. 


10:Ma. 




9:03 a. 


•3:30 T. 


.Hun Mate* Redwood 


•10:02 a. 


4:30 r. 


..and Meulo Park 


+3:30 p. 






1:36 p. 


.: 80 p. 




6:40 p. 


.'11 16 p. 




(7:60 p. 




9:03 a. 


10:30 A 


. Santa Clara, Sau Jose aud . . 1 i*I0*!a. 


v; BO p. 


....Principal Way Stations .. [ 4:36p. 




1 ) 


I 6:40 p. 



; Al maden and Way Stations, H 
8:30 A. 
•3:30 p. 



i\ 



Gilroy, Pajaro. I'tt-troville 
Salfnas and Monterey 



•10:02 a. 
6:40 p. 



8:30 A. I 
•3:30 p. | 



.Holllster aud Tres Pinos. 



•10:02 A. 
+6:40 p. 



8:30a.| I Watsonville, Aptos, Soquel | |'10:02A. 
*3:30p.| j.(C apitola ) and Santa Cruz | I 6:40p . 

j c Soledad, Paso Robles, -i I 
8:30 a. JTempleton (San Luis Oblspojj 6:40 p. 

I I and Way Station* ) I 

A.— Morning, p. — Afteruoon. 
•Sundays excepted. + Sundays only. J Theatre 
Train Saturdays only. 
Traius rim on Pacific Standard Time. 

STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 8:30 
A. m. Train. 



Nearly all rail line to SAN LUIS OBISPO. Only 
24 miles staging between Templetou and Sau Luis 
Obispo. Time from Sau Francisco, 12 hours. 

Through rate, $8.50. 



SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.— At Reduced 

Kates— In Gilroy Spring- and I'araixi Sjirinu., 



Excursion Tickets. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— Round Trip Tickets to the 

famous Lick Observatory (Mt. Hamilton), can be 

obtained at any of the Company's Ticket Offices 

in Sau Francisco. Rate — $5.50. 

For Inndavs onlv l So,d SUNDAY MORNING; good 

tor Sundays only, ( {or Ketum same da .. 

ForS«tnrd»v f S ° ld SATURDAY and SUNDAY 
SundRv and I onl >" Sood tor Ret,,rn uu,il fo1 - 
S M U „" d r. and 1 loAf, Hobday, inclusive, at 
l.the following rates: 



Monday. 



Round Trip Snn 

from San j 8 
Francisco to 



Tkt. 



Sat to Round Trip i,„„;Satto 



JlOU 

Tkt. 



Sau Bruno . - $ If 50 

Millbrae I. ... 65 

Oak Grove .. I I 90 

San Mateo... 75[ 1 10 

Belmont I 1 00, 1 25 

Redwood....! 1 00! 1 40 
Fair Oaks. . | 1 251 1 50 
Menlo Park., 1 25 1 60 
Mayfleld. . | 1 25 1 75 
Mouut'n V'w *1 50l*2 00 



from San 
Francisco to 



I Lawrences .. 
i Santa Clara.. 
'San Jose.. .. 

Gilroy 

'Hnllister ... 
I Aptos.. 

Loma Priela. 
Isoquel .. 
ISanta Cruz. . 

Monterey .. 



Mou 



1 50 2 25 
1 75 

1 75 

2 75 4 00 

4 50 

5 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES.— Passenger Depot, Townsend 
Street: Valencia-street Station, No. 613 Market St., 
Grand Hotel and Rotunda, Baldwin Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt Ag't 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: THE STEAM- 
ERS UMATILLA AND MEXICO— 

FOR VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND 
Ports — 9 a. m. every Friday. 

The steamer MEXICO, sailing every other Fri- 
day connects at Port Townsend with Steamers 
IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO.: Every five days. 

FOR SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hue- 
neme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, a. m. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay: CITY OF CHESTER, Every Tuesday 
at 9 o'clock a. M. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, ETC.: Ev- 
ery Monday, at 3 p. M. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents 

Sept. 17.] No. 10 Market street. 



-m --nfTc- 



^(tdMMmi 



Itfnni/IOBm SSl> A WKEK and 
W I ) K t\ expenses paid. Outfit worth 85 and 
I \J I 1 1 \ particulars free, r 



. o. 



Augusta, Me. 



Vickery, 

[Oct. 15. 



THE DONAHUE BROAD GAUGE R0UIE. 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, DICKMBI I: I l-.iT.au.l 

until further uotleo, Boats ami rralui win 

leave from and arrive al Snn Krnii. >Uco 1'n- 
scugor Dei ' '' IRKE'I 81 KJSK1 WU . 
follows: 



Leavk S. F. 



Arrivi: i 




7:4. r )A.M. ! SOUA M.I Gueruevllle, I, lor y .. i- m 

Stages connect at Santa lli.su f..r White Sulphur 
Springs, -,l,„.i,,|„,l „,,,! M„ r |; West Springs; al 
Clairville for skaggs Springs and at Cloverdale 
for Highland Springs, KeUeyvllle, s r „i H fj»y, 
Lakeport, Baratogs Springs, Blue Lakes. Hanlett 
Springs, rk-inli, Vlnhj Bprlngs, .Savarn. Itldge, 
Mendocino City aud the Gey 

EXCUKSION TICKETS from Satnrdavs to Mou- 
days— To Petaluma. SI 75; to Santa Rosa, ?3; to 
Healdsburg, 14; to Cloverdale, 15. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, *1 50; to Sauta Kosa, »2; to Healds- 
burg, »3; to Cloverdale. *4 50; to Guerucvllle,»3. 



Prom San Francisco to Point Tlburou and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:45 a. M.,y:15 a. If., 11 :;u v m. 

3:30 p.m., 5:00 r. H.,60S I'. M. ; S lays: 8:00 A. M. 

9:30 a. m., 11:00 a.m. 1:30 p. m.,5:00 p. m. 

To Sau Fraucisco from San Kafael, Week Days— 
0:20 a. M., 8:00 a. m., 0:30 a. m., 12 45 p. M., 8:40 p. v., 
5:05 p. M. : Sundays: 8:10a. m., 9:40 a. m., l'J:ir> p. m., 
3:30 P.M., 5:00 p. If. 

To San Fraucisco from Point Tlburou, Week 
Days— 0:50 a. m., 8:25 A. m., 9:55 a. m., 1:10 p. M., 
4:05 p. M., 5:88 P. M.; Sundays: 8:40 a. m., 10.05 a. m., 
12:40 p. M., 3:55 p. M., 6:30 p. M. 



H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Superintendent. Gen. Pass, aud Tkt. Agt. 



_ TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry. 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 

SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves Sau Fran- 
cisco aud Connects with Trains at SONOMA 
LANDING as follows: 

4-00 ''■ M " Daily (Sunday excepted), from 
.KJKJ WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF for 
the Town of Souoma, Glen Ellen aud Way Points. 
Returning, arrives in Sau Francisco at 9:00 a. m. 

Sunday Excursions. 

8.-IR a. M. (Sundays only), from WASHING- 
.J.CJ TON-Sl'KKET WHARF, for the Town 
of Souoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Return- 
ing, arrives in San Francisco at .1:00 p. m. Round- 
Trip Tickets to Souoma, U; Glen Elleu. »1 50. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Superintendent. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, aud Tkt. Agt. 



_ TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 

For New York via Panama, 

9. 8. Couma.. . . Wednesday, Jan 25th, at 10 a. M. 

For Ports of Call See Guide. 

Passengers booked through to and from Europe 
by any Hue. 

Fop Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City of Rio df. Janeiro Saturday, Jan. 21, 2 p. m. 
City of New York Saturday, Feb. 11, 2 p. m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Braunan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H. Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 21. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



Light-resisting Power of "Water.— Profee- 
boi torel is still continuing his researches as 
to the light-resisting power of water, his trials 
being made in the beautifully limpid contents 
of the Lake of Geneva. His method of pro- 
ceedure is to submerge chloride of silver 
papers at intervals of every 10 metres, after 
sunset, and then to take them up at night af- 
ter a day's exposure. Each piece of sensitive 
paper is'attached at intervals of 10 meters, and 
under suitable precautions, to a long rope. It 
was found that the depths where absolute 
darkness, or stoppage of actinic rays, was ob- 
served varied according to the month. Strange 
to say, March allowed the light to penetrate 
the greatest distance— 100 metres— while May 
and July respectively arrested it at the depths 
of 75 and 45 respectively. It is evident, there- 
fore, upon correlating* this experiment with 
others on record, that the results obtained 
must be a measure, not of the intensity of the 
light in the months named, but of the tur- 
bidity of the water. However, Professor Forel 
intends to continue these experiments every 
two months for the space of a year. 

— British Journal of Photography. 



A writer in the New York Truth says; I 
saw Clara Louise Kellogg on Broadway a few 
days since, in company with her husband, 
Mr. Carl Strakosch." At first sight the con- 
trast between them is funny, for Mr. Strakosch 
is very thin and small, while his wife is even 
larger than ever before. This size, however, 
does not seem to detract from the sweetness 
of her face, which is still very pretty. Mr. 
Strakosch has all the facial characteristics of 
his extensive and very well-known family. 
They are living in a charming dove-cot at 
Seventeenth street and Fourth avenue, and 
are very happy together, from all appearances. 
There is no danger of poverty ever knocking 
at their door, for Mrs. Strakosch is worth 
quite a quarter of a million, as she has been 
saving and frugal all her life long, and has, in 
her time, earned very large sums of money. 
Nor will she, as yet, give up a publiccareer. 



So Soon After the Bridal Day, Too. —Gen- 
tle Bridegroom — " I think its awfully bad form 
on your part, Angelina, to paint your cheeks 
and wear false hair; and I must — er — request 
you to abstain from doing so in future." Gen- 
tle Bride — "Bah! Don't be an idiot, Edwin. 
I shall do as I like— so there. Besides, you 
needn't talk. You paint your nose, stick pads 
on your shoulders, and wear some poor, dear 
monkey's false teeth in your great, ugly tuouth. 
And you're a nasty, "captious, ill-tempered 
thing. I wish I'd never married you! " 

Turkeys.— Turkeys are being shipped to 
England in greater numbers than ever before. 
One steamship on the 3rd ult. took out 700 
cases of dressed Canadian turkeys, the largest 
shipment of the kind ever made!! They travel 
by a fast express from Liverpool to London, 
where they find a ready market. Turkeys in 
England command from ?-t to $5 apiece. The 
experiment was first given a thorough trial 
last year, and it was a great success. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The California Powder Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholder? of The 
California Powder Works will be held at the office 
of the company. No. 230 California street, on 
MONDAY, i>th Februarv, 18S8, at twelve (12) 
o'clock m. Transfer book will close on 1st Febru- 
arv, at noon. 

Jan. 21.) JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 



DR. J. D. ARNOLD, 

THROAT, NOSE AND EAR. 

Removed from 229 Gearv to 235 Post, corner 
Stockton. Hours, 11 to 12 and 1 to 4. IJan. 21. 



MOUNT VERNON CO., BALTIMORE. 



__ -The undersigned having been appointed 
AGENTS FOK THE PACIFIC COAST for the sale 
of the manufactures of above company, have now 
in store: 

Sail Duck— all Numbers; 

Hydraulic— all Numbers; 

Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete As- 
sortment of All Qualities 28J^-Iaeb. DUCK, from 
7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



PEPITA. 

Up in her balconv where 

Vines through the lattices run 
Spilling a scent on the air, 

Setting a screen to the sun, 
Fair as the morning is fair, 

Sweet as a blosso is sweet, 
Dwells in her rosy retreat 
Pepita. 
Often a glimpse of her face 

When the wind rustles the vine 
Parting the leaves for a space 

Gladdens this window of mine, — 
Pink in its leafy embrace, 

Pink as the morning is pink, 
Sweet as a blossom I think 
Pepita. 
I who dwell over the way 

Watch where Pepita is hid — 
Safe from the glare of the day 
Like an eye under its lid: 
Over'and over I say, — 

Name like the song of a bird, 
Melody shut in a word, — 

" Pepita." 
Look where the little leaves stir ! 

Look, the green curtains are drawn! 
There is a blossom y blur 

Breaks a diminutive dawn ; 
Dawn and the pink face of her, — 

Name like a lisp .of the south, 
Fit for a rose's small mouth, 
Pepita ! 
-Frank Dempster Sherman , in The Century. 



THE BRUISER KING. 

The Whole World Pays Homage to Sulli- 
van, Our Sullivan. 



John L. Sullivan, whose success has been 
greater than that of any visitor to England 
except " Buffalo Bill," is a typical American 
in that all of his successes have been won by 
" hard knocks." 

Boston may hug herself with positive unc- 
tion in the knowledge that three representa- 
tives of her peculiar culture have won unusual 
social recognition in England — Lowell, Holmes 
and Sullivan. 

According to the English idea, the "greatest" 
of these is Sullivan. 

The phlegmatic English populace is seldom 
"enthused" to the point of unhitching the 
horses from the carriage of a popular idol, 
while excited men wrangle for the honor of a 
chance at the rope which is to drag it through 
the streets. 

It well illustrates the power of mind over 
matter. 

Sullivan, dined and wined by the nobility, 
followed and cheered by surging masses of 
" we, the people," drawing crowded houses at 
his exhibitions, must be sated, if one of his 
stamp can be, with adulation and applause. 

It would be a sad " blow" to him if he should 
be " knocked out " in his coming contest with 
the English champion. 

The best of athletes reach, sometimes early, 
a point at which their powers begin to wane. 
Over-training often produces serious effects. 
John G. Heenan died in the prime of life, 
wasted away with what was called consump- 
tion. A post mortem examination in many 
ot these cases has revealed that it is the pri- 
mary organs, the kidneys, liver and heart, 
that are most affected by athletic over-train- 
ing. If they are taken care of, there is little 
danger. 

Henry Wyatt, the celebrated English train- 
er and athlete, says: "I consider Warner's 
safe cure invaluable to all who are training 
for out-door sports. I have given it to many 
whom I have trained for the athletic world 
with great benefit." 

Sullivan is beyond question the present 
"Athletic King," and if he follows Wyatt's 
advice, he will no doubt long remain at the 
head of the " profession." 



DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy None but the Genuine— A Specific for Ex- 
hausted Vitality, Physical Debility, Waited Forces, 
etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California 
and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 
Market street, (Palace Hotel), Sau Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. 
Box of 50 pills, ?1 25; of 100 pills. $2; of 200 pills, 
?3 50; of 400 pills, $6. Preparatory Pills, $2. 

Send for Circular. 







The latest improved and most rapid Type-Writing 
Machine. It stands at the head. Send for circu 
lars, price list, and book of testimonials to the Es 
tate of SAMUEL HILL, Pacific Coast Agent, 735 
Market street, Bancroft History Building, San 
Francisco, California. fSept. 10. 



\A/ ANTF p\— Reliable parties to introduce 
VVrnIN I LU the Hartsfeld Automatic con- 
tinuous and improved economical Coke and Char 
coal Ovens of any capacity. Also, latest improved 
portable reductiou works and prospecting hand- 
power diamond bit rock drill that will bring up a 
solid core 500 feet. 



New Water Jacketed Cupola Furnace, 



KEIM'S new 
Water Jack- 
eted Cupola 
produces supe- 
rior castings, 
with a saving 
if a laborer 
ind four per 
entof a saving 
. u metal and 
iiel. It is espe- 
cially adapted 
for the use of 
tove, brass 

and iron 
founders, also 
for the treatment of phosphor-bronze, copper and 
bell metal. It is so constructed that it requires 
little if any repairs, and the bottom need not be 
dropped for months. Estimates furnished for 
portable reduction works, for the smelting of gold, 
silver, lead and copper ores. Assaying and Au- 
alizing promptly attended to by the best of chem- 
ists. 
Your correspondence is solicited. Send stamp. 

THE HARTSFELD FURNACE CO. (Limited), 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

ROX 45 t INov. 12. 




WALL PAPER ! 
WINDOW SHADES! 

THE LATEST DESIGNS IN 

American, French and Japanese Wall Papers. 

Interior Decorating and Frescoing a Specialty. 

G. W. CLARK & CO,, 

645 Market Street. 



"IT IS ALMOST HUMAN." 




"The Norton" 

Door-Check and Spring, 



Closes Doors Without Slamming, 

For sale only by 
FRANK D. MOBREIX. 
June 4.] 224 Market street, near Front S.F 



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Jan. 21, 188S. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISKK 



23 






MY UMBARELX. 
Though now your stick la cracked ami weak. 

Tour covering -lit and torn; 
Although your aged riba .ill creak, 

AJthoogh your ferrule's worn,— 

Although your handle long since went. 

Your tassels years ago . 
Although your feeble wires are bent 

By all the winds that blow, 

Though shattered, baggy, shivered, gamp, 

Friends never borrow thee ; 
Though thieves will ne'er with thee decamp, 

when they your weakness 

Ye! ^tiil T love youv -for I muse 
01 when l bought you firstr— 

Then you was 8UCD as BWellS WOUld OhOOSQ 

Though now you're at v> >ur wurM. 

Wliat pretto faces- "mash" of mine. 

I've sheltered neath your shade 1 
VThat charming walks in "nuld lung syne" 

Beneath your ribs I've made I 

Hut not for this I you endure 
And keep you like a brother— 

I'll use you 'till a chance i- -ure 

To steal a -omul one from some other! 



•ARTISTIC HOMES OF CALIFORNIA." 
No. 54. 

BJKWBKCBOF Mil. II. E. BOTHIh', SaN Fh.vM i.-ro. 

Upon the northeast corner oi Jackson ami Van Ness Avenue has 
recently been erected a beautiful ami artistic house. Fronting on 
Jackson street, it preaenta ;i striking appearance, with its bright roil 
foundation of brick, the tirst story in slate color, with darker trim- 
mings of tin- satin-, the second story a dark cream color, trimmed 
with dark slate, and the tower on the corner. The windows, of the 
heaviest French plate, are of varying sizes, some of them being set 
with small square panes. About the windows appear some heavy 
carving in wood. Which adds greatly to the artistic effect. The front 
entrance is reached by a stone Might, a platform and oaken steps, 
which mount to the gabled porch, the rooi of which is supported on 
carved caryatides. The double entrance doors are of solid oak, and 
recess themselves into the sides of the vestibule, which is paved with 
colored tiles. The vestibule doors, also of paneled oak, the upper 
Bashes tilled with beveled squares of plate gjass. The entrance hall 
is nearly square, inlaid with maple, the ceiling and dado of oak, the 
latter heavily paneled in squares. The side walls are in terra cotta. 

On either side of the front door is a small window. At right angles 
to the one on the right of the entrance is an oaken bench, extending 
from the front wall to the hall fireplace, also on the south side of the 
building. This fireplace is set in colorless brick, with a red hearth. 
The front of the mantel is of white stone, with leaves in sculptured 
relief, the letter 11 standing out in the center. The mantel-shelf and 
chimney-piece are of dark rich wood, i hi the left of the hail, the first 
room is* formed by a wide, sweeping, round window; the side walls 
are of terra-COtta ; the tloor, like that of the hall, is inlaid. This room 
communicates with the reception-room beyond, also with inlaidlioor, 
large window on the west. The fireplace, with its mantel and broad 
chimney-piece of ebony, is in the center of the north side. On the 
north end of the hall a" door leads into the dining-room, which also 
communicates with the reception-room. 

The dining-room has an unusually large swell bow window, which 
embraces the further corner and the west side Of the room. With 
this apartment communicate the butler's pantry and china closets. 
On the further side of the hall fire-place, on the east, a door leads into 
another large apartment, the library or sitting room. Beyond this 
are the back hall, stairs and side entrance. The kitchen and base- 
ment stairs are also in this direction. In the basement are the store- 
rooms, laundry, servants' room and heating apparatus. 

At the northern end of the main hall, to the right of the dining- 
room door, rises the solid oak staircase with its landing, from which 
rises a window of rich art glass, whose beautiful light is diffused 
throughout upper and lower null. 

On the second floor are the sleeping apartments, bath room and 
linen closet. The principal chamber is directly under the tower. 
The one over the dining-room opens out upon a loggia commanding 
a fine view of the bay and the surrounding scenery. Over the kitchen 
there is a grand window in that apartment, and another in the room 
over the library. In the third story there are several gable-win- 
dowed apartments besides the tower-room. As might be expected, 
the view, particularly from those on the north, is very fine and com- 
prehensive. The wood-work in this residence is remarkably beauti- 
ful, having been brought to a high state of polish. The window 
curtains, both of lace and silk, are of the finest material, while the 
portieres are rich and elegant. The tall hall clock, in its carved and 
brass-bound oaken case, is a prominent feature of the first floor. 
The house is very solidly built, has every convenience and comfort, 
and is furnished throughout with elegance and taste. 

The semi-annual statement of the Nevada Bank has just been 
made public, and it forms another demonstration of the fact that 
this great financial institution stands on a foundation which is as 
secure as the rock of Gibraltar. Notwithstanding the ferocious way 
in which this bank's credit was assailed by slanderous tongues, some 
months ago, the business for the half year just closed has been both 
voluminous and profitable, and it is clear that public confidence in 
the bonanza bank is unimpaired. 

The yearly balance sheet of the Anglo-California Bank makes an 
excellent showing, and speaks volumes for the energy and sagacity 
which are displayed in the management of that institution. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
Location or principal placi llforola. lx>ca- 

tlonol works— Virginia tuty, Nevada. 

Notice li borebj given thai »u meeting o! the H«.ard ..f Director*, held on 
the 17th 'lay .<f Jauuary, 1888, an .. 

r share wai levied upon the eHpiui stock oftha i parable 

Immediately, Id Unib i coin, to the Secretary, ai the 

ipauy, room 7.*, Nevadu Jtloek, N,.. ;«w Montgomery street. Sau Fran- 
■ alifornia. 
Any stock upon n bleb tail asseasmenl -hull remain unpaid on the 
Twenty-first (21 si) day of February. 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment U made be- 
fore, will be sold -in TUESDAY, the Thirteenth (18th) day of March, I 
pay the delinquent assessment, together v and ex 

peases of sale. Jlv order <>( the Hminl of 1 

CH 18. k. BLLTOT, 3i cretary. 
Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery street, Ban Fran- 

OisCO, California. [Jan. Jl. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— 8ao Franoisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora Minim; District, Elko County Nevada, 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twenty-ninth ii"->) day of December, 1887, an assessment (No. 6) ol 
Fifty (SOc.) Cents jut share waa levied upon the capital stock of the coi 
poration, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the company, Boom 52, Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery 
street, Ban Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment .shall remain unpaid on 

Monday, the sixth (6) day of February, 1888, will be delinquent. 
Ami advertised for sale at public auction; ami unless payment is made bo- 
fore, will be Bold on TUESDAY, the twenty-eighth (28) day ol February* 
1888, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costa of advents 
iug and expenses of sale. By order of the Board ol Dlreotors. 

fiKNKV DEAd, Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
California. [Dec. 31. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Navajo Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Tenth day of January, 1888, an assessment (No. is) of Thirty 
Cents (80c.) per snare was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the company, 310 Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Fourteenth Day of February, 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 6th day of March, 1888, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Piue street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 14. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of princinal place of business— San Fraucisco, California, Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Fourth day of January, 1888, an assessment (No. 48) of Fifty Cents 
(50c.) per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office of the 
Company, Room 3, No. 329 Pine street, Sun Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 8th day of February, 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction: and unless payment is mado be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the Twenty-ninth day of February, 1888, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMBS NKWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Stock Exchange Building, No. 321) Pine street, San Fran- 
eisco, California. [Jan. 7. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best Belcher Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 39 

Amount per Share 50 Cents 

Levied January 4th, 1888 

Delinquent in Office February 9th, 1888 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 2d, 1888 

L. OSBORN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. IJau. 7. 

English Milkweed Face Powder, 

White, Flesh, Pink and Cream Tints. 

The only harmless beautlfier. Used exclusively in the Courts of Europe. 
EDWIN W. JOY, 
Nov. 12.] S52 Market Street, Sole Agent. 

DR. GEO. H. PALMER 

Has Removed His Office to 427 Sutter Street, near corner of Powell. 
Hours, 1 to 3 P. M. Residence, N. E. corner of Jackson and Fillmore Streets. 
Telephone 4,189. fJan. 21. 

I— ii r~ I r\ ( A natural product of the Finest 

Eclipse Extra uryfedy. oftheftrorld - N ° addi «° c °' 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 21, 1888. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
At the present moment several members of the British Parliament 
are confined in British jails. This fact is a deeply significant one. It 
indicates one of two things— either the British Parliament has de- 
generated to such a low level that it contains a considerable element 
of common criminals, or the administration of the law is being so 
administered that people who are not criminals are being punished 
as such. And in connection with the first alternative, it should be 
clearly borne in mind that the British Parliament of to-day is repre- 
sentative of the British people to an extent which, it never was before. 
Which, then, of these alternatives is the correct one? Have the peo- 
ple of the British Isles so deteriorated morally that men of criminal 
instincts and criminal habits form their representative men. or is the 
Government of the day so abusing its high trust that the even ad- 
ministration of criminal justice is being bent to the purpose of im- 
prisoning its political opponents? A calm and unprejudiced exam- 
ination of the facts must convince any person of ordinary intelligence 
that neither Sir Wilfred Blunt nor Mr. Cunningham Graham are 
"criminals," if language be used to express its ordinary meaning. 
If it be used in a specious way for the purpose of covering up absurd 
sophistries, perhaps some little element of criminality may be found 
in the conduct of Mr. Cunningham Graham. He led a gathering 
of people — a mob, if you like the term better— which 
attempted to push its way past a force of police in 
order to hold a public meeting on the steps of the monument 
in Trafalgar Square. He and those who were associated with him 
believed that they had the right to so meet, and that they were vindi- 
cating that nght'by subjecting themselves to the murderous violence 
of the police. The right to hold public meetings in Trafalgar Square 
had, up to the incident in question, been conceded, and even now it 
is claimed. Sir Charles Warren, the head of the London police force, 
had issued a " proclamation " declaring that he would prevent, with 
force, the holding of the meeting in question, and that, in advance, 
he branded it as an illegal gathering. It is now admitted upon all 
sides that Sir Charles Warren had as much right to issue that procla- 
mation as he bad to hang the Prince of Wales. To put the matter 
otherwise, Mr. Cunningham Graham and his associates had a legal 
right to meet in Trafalgar Square, and the police, in preventing him 
from carrying out his purpose, were guilty of a legal wrong. It is 
true that, in a recent case in which this issue was involved, an Eng- 
lish Judge held that Sir Charles Warren having (although without 
warrant of law) declared this meeting illegal, it was the duty of the 
people to submit — subject to their privilege to take subsequent legal 
proceedings to establish their legal rights. But this grotesque de- 
cision only serves to show that the British Bench has lost that sturdy 
independence of character which, in early days, sent the heir to the 
throne to jail because of his rowdy conduct; serves, in fact, to show 
that the second alternative mentioned in the beginning of this para- 
graph is the correct one, and that the fact that there are now a num- 
ber of members of the British Parliament confined in places which 
are maintained for the restraint of the criminal element of society is 
not an indication of the fact that the august hody in question is de- 
generating into a body of criminals, but rather is it suggestive of the 
existence of a government, whieh is " strong " and " resolute" in the 
same sense that the Czar of Russia and the Sultan of Turkey are 
" strong" and " resolute." The Judge's utterances would not have 
been more idiotic had he alleged that if Sir Charles Warren were to 
attempt, under cover of one of his own " proclamations," to violate 
another man's wife (or commit some equally infamous crime), the 
injured man was bound to submit to the outrage— subject to his sub- 
sequent right to legal redress. The illustration constitutes an ab- 
surdity, but it is not more absurd than the contention. 

But while there may be.some shadow of a dispute as to the case of 
Mr. Cunningham Graham there can be none as to that of Sir Wilfred 
Blunt. A more despotic and scandalous proceeding cannot be con- 
ceived of. It is in effect a denial of the right of free speech, and it, 
in common with most, if not all of the other imprisonments which 
have taken place under the Crimes Act, sets a precedent which may 
prove very unfortunate by and by. The spirit of the British Consti- 
tution is being broken when the Ministry can send its political op- 
ponents to jail for expressing their opinions. And this is. exactly 
what is happening in Ireland almost every week, and what has hap- 
pened in Sir Wilfred Blunt'scase. It is idle to say that this gentle- 
man has been sent to prison because he gave utterance to " seditious" 
language. The term " seditious " used in such a connection is simply 
an absurdity. Sir Wilfred Blunt is an English gentleman, somewhat 
noted for his humane and philanthropic views on almost all ques- 
tions. He has no desire to overturn the " authority " of the British 
Government, and consequently could not have been guilty of sedition 
within the true meaning of the term. It is true that he did in a pub- 
lic speech advise his hearers to persevere in the " plan of campaign," 
but the sweeping reductions which have just been made in judicial 
rents in Ireland (under an act passed by Salisbury's Government at 
the last session of Parliament) go to show that the so-called " plan of 
campaign " was justifiable. But whether that be so or not, it would 
be as reasonable to send a man to jail for denouncing vaccination as 
for indorsing the " plan of campaign."* Such questions are matters 
in regard to which there is legitimate room for a difference of opinion. 

The European " war scare " is maintained with even more than 
reasonable diligence. The press reporters keep their columns well 
filled with the movements, or alleged movements, of troops and mu- 
nitions of war, and other bellicose indications. At the same time 
there is a quiet hint thrown out occasionally to the effect that the 
folks who are taking off their coats to fight are equally ready to kiss 
and make up on easy terms. So long as this is the case there is small 
danger of any immediate outbreak of hostilities. The truth of the 
matter is that Russia is running a big game of bluff. The advent of 
Prince Ferdinand on the Bulgarian throne without the Czar's per- 
mission humiliated Russia and-struck a terrible blow at her prestige. 
It is that fact which is at the bottom of the present disturbance. 
When Prince Ferdinand went to Sofip the News Letter said that he 
was acting with the silent approval of those who were able to help 



him, and that when the time came he would receive all the assistance 
he needed ; and that is the position of things to day. Russia wishes 
to drive him out of Bulgaria, but she does not dare to attempt it. 
Russia played dog in the manger in regard to Bulgaria until the situ- 
ation became intolerable, and then the election of Prince Ferdinand 
was compassed and his assumption of the throne was accomplished. 
These doings constituted a very neat checkmate to the policy which 
Russia was pursuing and put her in a hole from which she is now 
trying to extricate herself by creating the present war scare. It 
seems to us, however, that this is a transparent bluff, because Russia 
is not in a position to face the combination which is against her at 
present, and is not mad enough to attempt it. It is possible that a 
compromise may be effected upon the basis of the withdrawal of 
Prince Ferdinand, but the probabilities are decidedly against such a 
course. 

There is more truth than poetry in the statement made by the 
Christian Leader to the effect that it is not the low-toned but the high- 
toned readers who are responsile for the low-toned press, and that 
any paper would sink were it not for the responsibility given to it by 
its contingent of respectable patrons. It declares that there will be 
no improvement in the papers which print copious reports of prize 
fights, divorce suits and scandals, until self-respecting readers with- 
draw their support from them. That's it exactly. The demand calls 
out the supply and the respectability of a few of the customers lends 
condonation to the iniquity of the business. 

Professor Hilgard considers that most valuable plant, ramie, to 
be one of the most promising cultures of California, and having for 
fifteen years followed the plant in Louisiana and California, he claims 
to know something about it. He says that the ramie plantation on 
the University grounds at Berkeley, made with roots in 1881, has 
yielded its fifth crop at the rate of five tons of dried stalks per acre. 
He thinks that with irrigation an average of seven tons per acre can 
be relied upon anywhere in the San Joaquin valley. 



Ladies' Chiffoniers, 
With bonnet box and jewel case, with Yale lock, at Chadbourne's, 
741, 743 and 745 Market street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Eureka Consolidated Mining Company, 

San Francisco, January 17, 1888. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held this day, at the office of the 
above Company, 306 Pine street, San Francisco, a dividend (No. 81) of 
twenty-five ceuts (25c.) per share was declared upon the capital stock of the 
above Company, payable on FRIDAY, February 3d, 1888. Transfer books 
will be closed Saturday, January 28, 1888, at 12 m. 

H. R. P. HUTTON, Secretary. 
Note.— Dividend ou stock issued in New York since May 1, 1884. payable 
at the office of C. E. Laidlaw, 14 Wall street, New York. [Jan. 21. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the North Belle Isle Mining Company, 

San F°ancisco, January 16 1888. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
held this day, dividend No. 3 of fifty (50) cents per share was declared, 
pavable THURSDAY, February 2, 1888. Transfer books will close on Thurs- 
day. January 26, 1SSS, at 3 o'clock p. M. J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 21. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1887, the Board of Directors of 
The German Savings and Loan Society has declared a Dividend at the 
rate of four aud one-half (4V£) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and 
three and three-fourth.- i??*) "per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, and 
pavable on and after TUESDAY, the 3d day of January, 1888. 

Dee. 31.J By order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Northwest Corner Powell aud Eddy Streets. 
For the half rear ending December 81, 1887, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and one-half (4U) per cent, per auuum on Term Deposits, 
and three and three-fourths (3%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, pavable on and after TUESDAY, January 3, 1888. 
Dec 31 1 VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

San Francisco, January 4, 1888. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 

day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 3% per cent, per annum on 

all deposits for the six mouths ending December 31, 18S7, free of all taxes, 

aud payable from aud after this date. 

Jan. 7. | ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Firemans Fund Insurance Company, 

San Francisco, January 9, 1888. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Company, held this 
dav a dividend was declared, pavable on and after January 10, 1888. 
Jan. 14.] WM. J. DUTTON, Secretary. 

Piano-Forte Card. 

MR. HENRY MARSH receives Pupils at his MUSIC STUDIO, 103 
O'Farrell Street, and at his private residence, 2307 Jones Street. 

Agent for Robert Fay's Unriuated Pianos, CASH OR INSTALLMENTS, 
[Jan. 14.1 



Vol. XXX ill I. 



' 



NE^'S pETJTER 

CTaltforniii JUbcrtiscr. 



Ocvcnro to the Lcachmo Is 



m aso T«t P*crnc Coast. 

l'.mnTT, 
Subscription, 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JAN UARY 28, IS88. 

THE BUSINESS OFFICES of the S. F. NEWS 
LETTER have been removed to Flood Building, corner 
Market "ml Fourth Sin., where ordi •> for advertisi 

ntbscriptiont will be received nnd communications 
should he addressed. Subscribi r& not receiving the NEWS 
LETTER regularly will confer a favor mi the publisher by 
notifying him. , 

FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



The Comstock market has been lively 'hiring the week, ami invest- 
on who took the N swfl LRTKBtip on Challengeand Confidence. given 
two weeks ego, bare realized a handsome profit on their purchases, 
the prices having doubled up in the mean time* A movement is now 

DOted in Alpha stock, on the strength of important work in crosscut- 
tiiiL', which will commence in the mine before very long. The North 
ends have been heavy, and the middle mines inactive during the 
week. Some signs of a revival oi activity are noted in Crown Point 
and Belcher, in the newer mines a marked advance is noted in 
Keyes. This is due to the ledge being cut at the bottom of the shaft, 
which is considered quite an important development by those who 
favor the east ledge theory. It was to test this question that induced 
Governor Perkins and other prominent citizens to invest in this 
property, and the results so far obtained will go far to establish a be- 
lief that perhaps the gentlemen who have maintained for years the 
existence oi this ledge may not have been so far wrong after all. Con. 
Virginia is extracting ore to the usual extent. C hollar and Potosiare 
milling on $20 rock! Savage and Korcrosa have an abundant supply, the 
only trouble being a lack of proper milling facilities. The mines of 
the" lode are looking well, which is more than can be said for the 
market generally. 

News from Tu'scarora is limited, on account of the severe weather 
checking communication. A telegram from North Belle Isle reports 
the mill working to full capacity on ore the pulp assays of which run 
up to $241 per ton. Grand Prize has started milling on ore which 
pulps $200 per ton. 

A mining boom in Wales is at present attracting the attention of 
English experts. It is not viewed with favor by the financial press as 
a rule, the Times alone expressing confidence in the future of working 
results. Judging from the crude reports which have been made on 
the property in question, the English M. E. is sadly behind the times. 
His knowledge seems to be wholly superficial, and his reasoning and 
descriptions most unintelligible to the Western ear. From none of 
the so-called experts, who have so far made their views public, can 
be obtained an understanding of the situation on which to form an 
opinion. A practical quartz miner from California would decide the 
question in short order. From the many statements made, the" stone " 
must be something similar to the ores in Meadow Lake, taking 
for granted the experts know free gold from ordinary iron pyrites, 
which is doubtful. One or two of the more practical men who have 
examined the property maintain that " the hard and hungry quartz 
veins of Wales will not pay to work for gold, as the metal contained 
in them is for the most part not native, and all the mechanical con- 
trivances in the world will not reach gold in chemical combination." 
The Times, as usual, has gone off at a tangent under a bad attack of 
the craze. Little attention is, however paid to its opinions on min- 
ing, which are at all times inclined to be unreliable. In 1862 it 
backed up a similar project, which resulted in a complete failure. 
The mining staff of the Thunderer is certainly composed of very in- 
ferior material. The report on the late development in WaPis was 
an absurd production which provoked adverse criticism even in Lon- 
don. Here it would have been relegated to the waste basket in short 
order. After reading the professional opinions on mines and mining 
from an English standpoint, it does not seem strange that so many 
of their foreign propositions prove failures. While undoubtedly ex- 
perts in tin and coal, when it comes to gold and silver, they know lit- 
tle or nothing. The London Financial News and Money, do not seem 
to regard the prospects of the Welsh bonanza with much favor. 

The London mining market is strong and buoyant, and the pros- 
pects are favorable for a good year in that class of business. The 
London Financial Review says in regard to the outlook: "We venture 
to predict that this year of grace, 1888, will witness a continuation of 
the revival of active interest in the mining industry, which was a 
feature of the last quarter of 1887. The list of dividend-paying mines 
will be largely increased, and, with a reasonable amount of caution, 
small investors who put their savings into low-priced mining shares 
will be enabled to reap a rich harvest." It is to oe hoped that in tak- 
ing advantage of this favorable condition of affairs, our California 
mines will be worthily represented. There are several properties in 
this State which would be greatly benefited by the aid of large capital 
for the purposes of development. These should be put forward to 
the exclusion of the worthless catch-pennies, which generally work 
to the front to damage, eventually, the reputation of our mines. 
California is the banner gold-mining country of the world, which 
foreign investors have yet to learn. When they unfortunately make 



mistake*, like the i nion nnd \ ..:. , Gold, they most blame their 
credulity mid nol th. 1 1,. 

ng 'these properties, but though it their m< 

losl In i such wildcat venti . It own lookout 

pie will doubtless, hi thv I i, u |vlcc oi th . 

are better acquainted with mine nnd mlnln 

Copper U 'till on the advanci 
the world are In denian | the leading forel 

papers arc inclined to believe thai th.- price will yel 
While such an advance might m ned at an extraordinarily 

high point, still good figures nre u certainty In the future, which In 

tsell should warrant the re-opening oi many «.t the copper nmi 
in this state and Nevada. The i ittributed to the a< I 

a Parisian syndicate, and the press of that city seems to take the 
matter ren much to heart. The movement Is.howevei 

nj who were caught with n mil stock, one English Hrm cl< 
ap in three days over $450,000. A lamentable effect of th< 
in the English financial p advance in prices of brass bed- 

tead 

a new phase ol cunning has developed In the scientific proi 
of mining companies, acting as ngenl tor mining journal \ ;cn tie- 
man who is listed in the rank- ol London manipulators, has deei 1 

it nrudent to hang out his shingle as agent in thai city for a paper 
which makes a feature of the mining business, it it a case where 
prevention is better than cure? 

A fair idea of Baron Grant's ability as a financier la contained Ln 
the following statement ol a< counl n ndered a gentleman now in bhii 

town ironi Ins London solicitors, who was knocked for a COOl £400: 
To amount of dividend of fourpence in the a upon £400, £6 13s. Id. ; 
less charges for proving debt and for securing said dividend, 
id.; leaving a balance of i;; -. about $i"> on an indebtedness of 
$2,000. This settles any question of the Karon's peculiarly far-reach- 
ing powers of penetration. 

-Mr. Boyd, the well-known London mining engineer, desires a cor- 
rection made in this column in regard to the statements made some 
time ago of his connection with the Mulattos mine of Mexico. \\y 
take pleasure in doing so, on the strength of the gentleman's per on- 
al repudiation. 

If any institution supported by the public requires an overhauling 
it is the State Mining Bureau. There is an unpleasant feeling abroad 
that it is inclined to subserve private interests to an extent which is 
not in bearing with the purposes for which it was originally 
created. 

The New Mexican Railroad Company have moved into capacious 
offices in the Stock Exchange building on Pine street. Arrangements 
for the necessary capital have now all been perfected. 

The announcement is now made that Baron tyrant, owing to press 
of other business, has been compelled to tender his resignation a- a 
director of the Union Gold. This is the polite way of putting it. 

THE PEST HOUSE. 
A great deal of balderdash and nonsense is being talked about 
the location of a new Pest House for the reception of small-pox 
patients. Thanks to the press, it is now admitted that the present 
institution is old, cold, leaky, and ought to be condemned, and now 
the Mayor and his colleagues of the Hoard of Health, are exercised 
over the question as to where the new l'est House ought to be lo- 
cated. They realize that it is an undesirable neighbor; nobody 
wants it, whilst everybody desires to avoid it as the plague-spot it 
naturally would be. The truth is that there should not be a Pest 
House within the city limits at all, and when members of the Board 
of Health think there ought to be, they only evince their ignorance 
of how such matters are managed in the great ports of the world. 
The exclusion of contagious disease is not a matter for San Francisco 
alone, but is a question of grave concern to the whole State. There 
should be a quarantine station consisting of several so-called " Pest 
Houses," and it should be located at some isolated spot on the shores 
of the bay. Small-pox should be met at the Golden Gate and pre- 
vented from coming nearer than the quarantine station. If by any 
accident or oversight it should happen to get in, all cases, whether 
in San Francisco, Oakland, San Kafael or elsewhere, should be sent 
to the quarantine station. There, and there alone should the disease 
be treated, it will be said, as it has been said, that a conflict of au- 
thority would prevent any such arrangement being carried out. 
Nonsense! There is no conflict of interest, and therefore there can 
be no conflict of fact in shutting out a plague. 

GO AND SEE IT. 
The great Merced reservoir, which covers an area of some six 
hundred and forty acres of land, is now completed, and water will be 
turned into it from the canal on next Wednesday, the first day of 
February. This is beyond all doubt the greatest irrigation enterprise 
which has ever been consummated in this State, and naturally enough 
the incident is to be turned into a great demonstration. The lifting 
of the head -gate is to be attended by imposing ceremonies; it is to 
be performed by Mr. Charles Crocker in the presence of Governor 
Waterman, his staff, and the various State officers. In Merced and 
neighborhood the entire day will be devoted to a grand celebration of 
the event, which, it is expected, will be very fruitful of results to that 
section of the State. It is anticipated that the celebration will attract 
a large gathering of people from all over the State, and special trans- 
portation facilities are being arranged for the occasion. Excursion 
tickets will be issued from all parts of the State, and those who wish 
to keep in touch with the industrial development of the common- 
wealth should make it their business to be present and see for them- 
selves what the probable effect of the completion of this great enter- 
prise will be, as well as hear what is the opinion of others on the sub- 
ject. 

By a ministerial decree, issued at Paris on December 29th, 1887, 
Mr. Xavier Mefret, Director of the " French and English Institute," 
was nominated to and received the palm of "Officer d'Academic." 
This is a University rank, and it was granted for services rendered to 
the cause of public instruction. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



SOCIETY. 



"Thank Heaven! we have California weather again," is an excla- 
mation I have heard not once, but many times during the past week. 
Even though it be rain and foe, it is preferable to frost and snow, to 
which we of California do not take kindly, and I think the feeling of 
delight is universal that our late Arctic experiences are at an end. 
' The soft, warm rain which has succeeded the cold is doing wonders 
for the country. The Park looks like quite another place since the 
thermometer commenced its upward flight, and on the few non-rainy 
days of the present week has been crowded with visitors. 

Society is scarcely vet rested. It has by no means ceased talking 
of the late fancy dress ball at Mrs. Howard's, which was assuredly 
! the most brilliant gathering San Francisco has known for many 
, years. The reaction may possibly account for the comparative quiet 
■ that has ensued, for, though there have been entertainments given 
| since, they have not been entered into with the zest that under other 
circumstances might have been expected. Take, for instance, the 
I Bachelor's Club German last Friday evening. It was a very pleasant 
| party. There can be no dispute on that head, but there was a lack 
i of life about it that was most noticeable. Mr. Greenaway resumed 
! his position as leader and gave universal satisfaction— as indeed he 
I always does— to his followers in the intricate mazes of the dance. 
! The hall had returned to its usual appearance, which was somewhat 
changed by the decorations used at the Army German, and the at- 
tendance was good, though not large. Mrs. Voorhies' Tea, on Satur- 
day, was another pleasant gathering, though the afternoon was 
about as disagreeable climatically as rain could make it. The rooms 
were very prettily decorated and were well filled with guests, especi- 
ally about five o'clock, and tea, music and discussing the recent ball 
were the chief features of the entertainment, which, however, seemed 
to suffice for those assembled, as all appeared to enjoy themselves. 

It was scarcely expected that the third of the Miller receptions at 
the J ones' residence on Pine street would have drawn so large a num- 
ber of guests as it did last week, following so closely upon the ball of 
the night before, but av contraire the callers, both day and evening, 
were very numerous, and in the evening dancing was the rule, as it 
has been at all the others of these pleasant receptions. This week 
has not been very startlingly gay, though each night has had its es- 
pecial engagement. At the Baldwin, on Monday evening, a very 
large crowd of fashionables were to be seen, gathered for the purpose 
of giving a welcome to Dorothy, which was a most cordial one. The 
private view of the exhibition of paintings at the Art Association 
rooms was largely attended on Tuesday evening. The pictures are 
nearly all gems, and some of them one can see again and again with 
increasing pleasure at each inspection. 

"Wednesday evening brought the brief season of Assembly parties 
to an end, but they have been satisfactory enough to warrant the be- 
lief that another series will be undertaken next Winter. Ferns, pot- 
ted palms and smilax were used in decoration, and the pretty hall 
looked bright and attractive, and with the exception of the music 
(and I must confess I have danced to better), the evening maybe 
considered a success. Most ot the lady patronesses were present, any 
quantity of pretty girls and a goodly number of beaux. The dresses 
were becoming to their wearers, and the supper a good one. The 
final dance of the German Club series will not take place till after 
Lent, and then, as usual, at Union Square Hall. 

To-dav Mrs. Bowen, of Franklin street, gives a tea for the purpose 
of introducing her daughter, Miss Mary Bowen, to society. The 
number of debutantes this season has been an unusually large one, 
and I think the title I heard bestowed the other day has been fairly 
earned, i. e., "the rosebud season of '87." More cards are out for 
next week, which will fill it up quite comfortably. The Misses Night- 
engale give a dance on Tuesday evening, and Mrs. Mullins an- 
nounces another for the evening of Thursday, at her Gough street 
home. The third concert of the eleventh season of the Loring Club 
takes place at Odd Fellows' Hall on Wednesday evening, February 15. 
In addition to everything else that is coming off, the ladies of the 
French Catholic Church have arranged for a three days and nights 
bazar at Union Square Hall for the benefit of the fund for their 
church building on Bush street. Attractive programmes have been 
announced, and it is a pity that some other time than the busiest 
week society has known this season could not have been selected for 
their undertaking. In Jewish circles the chief events of late have 
been the handsome receptions given at the Sachs' residence on 
Leavenworth street in honor of the engagement of Miss Stella Sachs 
to Mr. Edward Kirschler, and the wedding at Mr. Martin Heller's, 
on Tuesday last, of Miss Bertha Tichner, his niece, to Mr. Samuel 
Strauss, which was a grand affair. This has not been a very prolific 
wedding season so far, though after Lent, I am given to understand, 
that they will be tolerably numerous. The chief one on the tapis at 
present is to take place in Oakland, when Miss Nellie Smith will be 
married to Mr. Tower, of New York, which city will be the bride's 
future home. 

The wedding of Miss Cornelia O'Neal and Mr. Joseph R. Ryland 
took place at St. John's Church Wednesday, the 25th, the Arch- 
bishop officiating. The reception held at the home of the bride was 
a very enjoyable, pleasant affair, owing to the warm hospitality of 
the host and hostess. The bride, who at all times is a mostcharm- 
ing little lady, was attired in an elegant white satin. Assisted by 
the three pretty bridesmaids, she received the guests with much 
grace. After congratulations were offered, a delightful breakfast 
was served at small tallies. The presents were not only numerous 
and elegant, but of much variety and uniqueness. 

The following San Franciscans were registered, last week, at the 
Long Beach Hotel, Long Beach, Cal. ; Mr. and Mrs. F.S.Chad- 
bourne; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Jaynes; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Wil- 
shire; Mr. and. Mrs. Alex. Russell, and Mr. E. G. Pierce. 

Mrs. J. Bolado is still confined to her home, No. 528 Sutter street. 
Her mother, Mrs. J. Abrego, of Monterey, has been with her during 
her severe illness. 

Last Sunday night St. Luke's Church was filled by a congregation 
composed of members of every Episcopal Church in the city. Bishop 



Lyman preached on this occasion. This church will soon be too 
small to accommodate the constantly increasing throng of worship- 
ers. Mr. Davis, the indefatigable little rector, has accomplished 
wonders as an organizer and executive. The music is always good, 
and not to have heard St. Luke's choir is to have missed a good deal. 
To-morrow morning Mr. Keith will sing the Offertory. 

1 have been very glad to welcome Mrs. Floyd to town during the 
past few weeks. She is one of society's old-time favorites, and has of 
late years absented herself altogether too much from it. But it seems 
that Mount Hamilton has possessed for her more attractions than 
San Francisco could offer; hence our loss. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Redding are back at home again in 'Frisco from 
a very pleasant trip East; also Mrs. Charles Crocker, who was ac- 
companied by her son George on her journey from New York. Mr. 
William Ward returned on Saturday last from quite a long business 
visit to Australia, and on Monday arrived Miss Eileen Ivers from 
Honolulu, where she has been spending the past few months with 
her sister, Mrs. Irwin. Ex-Governor Pacheco is paying San Fran- 
cisco a brief visit from his present home in Mexico; and the Fruit- 
growers' Convention, which is a very large one, has been in session 
here during the week. There is not much going and coming " over 
the road " at present— travel is too uncomfortable for that just now— 
but from all Ihear I should say that California will be quite overrun 
with visitors as soon as the Spring fairly opens. Felix. 

THE DEAD MAESTRO. 
Mr. Stephen H. Marsh. — This venerable gentleman died at his 
home on Mission street in this city on last Saturday. The deceased 
was born in Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, and if he had lived 
about thirteen days longer he would have reached the ripe old age of 
eighty-four. He was in many respects a remarkable man, and bis 
career in life presents many features of general public interest. The 
world of to-day is amazed at young Hoffman's precocious genius. 
More than three-quarters of a century ago Mr. Marsh, then a child 
of four years of age. made his first public appearance at a concert 
given in the Assembly Rooms of Sidmouth, where he played on the 
piano the then celebrated composition, " The Battle of Prague," and 
received enthusiastic applause for his skill. Subsequently he was 
placed under the instruction of very distinguished teachers in Lon- 
don, and his phenomenal talents cultivated to the fullest extent. 
While still a boy Mr. Marsh made his first public appearance in Lon- 
don at a grand dinner given at the Freemasons' Tavern, in aid of the 
Artists' Fund. He was then eleven years old. The same night John 
Barnet and Nelson (afterwards distinguished composers)sangin pub- 
lic for the first time. Upon arriving at maturity the deceased en- 
gaged in the giving of instruction on the piano and harp as well as in 
vocal music as a profession, and in this pursuit he met with great 
success. A partial list of his pupils, which we have been permitted 
to examine, seems almost like a directory of the leading people of 
England. We selected the following names at random from it: 
Baroness Burdett-Coutts, the Dowager Lady Iddlesleigh, the daugh- 
ters of General Lord Napier, the daughters of Admiral Lord Ex- 
mouth, the sisters of Captain Speke (the African explorer). Sir John 
H. Lethbridge, the daugnters of the Earl of Rathdown, Mrs. Kirk- 
patrick, aunt of the Empress Eugenia, Princess Doria and Princess 
Borgese of Italy, Lady Audley and Lady Manning. These few names 
are significant of the esteem in which Mr. Marsh was held in crowded 
Europe. The deceased resided for some time in India, and for a very 
long time in Australia. In fact, in regard to the latter place, he may 
well be regarded as an old colonist. It was he who proposed that the 
Government encourage the building of railroads by making to private 
corporations a grant of a certain quantity of land for every mile of 
road built (which is practically the method which the American Gov- 
ernment many years afterwards employed to encourage railroad con- 
struction). In the furtherance of tins scheme Mr. Marsh abandoned 
his professional engagements in Sydney, went home, and for three 
years engaged in flushing the matter on the attention of the Colonial 
Office. His efforts, however, only met with qualified success, and he 
returned to his professional pursuits. In addition to being a dis- 
tinguished performer and teacher, the deceased was also a composer, 
and many of his pieces were received with great favor bjr the public. 
In 1874 Mr. Marsh came to San Francisco with his family, and his 
home has been here ever since. Owing to his advanced age, Mr. 
Marsh did not actively engage in professional duties during the 

Eeriod of his residence in this city, but in a domestic and social way 
is courtly manners and gentle, kindly nature endeared him to all he 
came in contact with. 











pp 0}«* yM >f 



v 



Jan. >, ISSs. 



- \\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



8 



WESTWARD THE PLATE OF FASHION TAKES ITS 
WAY 
Ins a commonly accepted i l bange in the fash- 

Ion iii least ■ year to iae tbis 

1 tit there are .» tew ex< eniions, While It i-- ■ mooted 
as i.« which Is worse, i<> be far in advance ol tin- mode or boh 
behind It both bavi yel ;t must be conceded thai 

there fa a certain pleasure In setting tin- fashion. N 
charm ol Its own, and there Is ■ satisfaction in tin- kn< 

li and as to inateriaia. are not " dread- 
fully common." Thai they will become common, and thai p< 
i- their fate. It matters not how rich >» r bow elegant tin- fabric, the 
areed for gain will lead to the manufacture ol an Imitation m 
less ahoddj What of thai I a great deal. To be sure the million- 
aire's wife, wh<> can wear an Imported dress ol the original material, 

need never buy ■ yard ol the cheaper g la. Bhe perhaps 

never see it until her servant, maul, nurse-girl or rook makes hi 
pearance In a dress copied after that ol her mistress with such fidelity 
'irr aspiring Irish eye can carry. The millionaire's 



t<- the pattern as hi 

wife will probably discard the gown which has served as a fashion plate 
to her domestio, or she may discharge the presumptuous female. 
That depends entirely upon toe mistress, a.a she Is a millioi 
wife and can buy new gowns whenever she !><• bo inclined, the probs 
bUftiea are that she will overlook the offense, particularly il the girl 
be a good one. At the same time she will have enlarged views upon 
the comprehensiveness of the doctrine ol " Liberty, equality and fra- 
ternity,' as applied to the subject of mistress and maid. In tier 
secret loan she will wish that sne might follow the example, albeit, 
a somewhat despotic one, inaugurated by a social grand Turk a few 
ago. With the autocratic authority ol Pasha to hia harem, he 
i i that, upon pain of dismissal, no htvuiH in his house should 
copy the dresses of their mistress and her daughters; that when the 
ladies wore standing collars, those of the maids must lie very flat, 
and when the ladies desired to appear with rolling bands of white, 
the maids must don the chokers. To an aristocratic mind this is as 
it Should be. From a servant's standpoint, too, this edict was not 
without its advantages. The ladies were hideously ugly, and a come- 
ly maid might congratulate herself upon the impassibility of ever be- 
ing mistaken for one of the family, ^o much for San" Frnncisco's 
aristocracy. 

This is all very well for millionaires and their wives; but when the 
mistress ol but one maid-of-all-work suddenly surprises that person- 
age in the very act of trying on the gown just delivered by the dress- 
maker, it. to say the least, is highly vexatious. Not to dwell upon the 
mistress's sensations as she sees her dress copied, travestied, bur- 
lesqned, by poor workman-hip, cheaper materials, and such a figure; 
not to speak of her exasperation when she is told that some one, see- 
ing the second edition issue from the front door at church time, had 
momentarily mistaken Bridget for madam; it must be allowed, by 
way of returning to the original proposition, that there is a satisfac- 
tion in being the undispul <>r of a novelty in dress. 

Now, is it true that San Francisco is alwayB a year or more behind 
the fashion? Not always, as the following incident will show. One 
of our leading dressmakers went to Paris, commissioned, among 
other orders, to bring home a dress for a young lady and a cloak for 
a matron. She went direct to one of the world-famed establishments 
in the French capital, and for her they "curuposed" a dress. A word 
about the composing of a garment. There is a dressmaker in Paris — 
or, to be more exact, a ladles' tailor— who, some years ago, invented 
the now famous tailor-made suit. Trim, jaunty and stylish, it at once 
sprang into favor. Wonderfully becoming to'all ladies who had not 
yet lapsed into the figure S, and unquestionably superior to all other 
walking costumes for the ease and freedom it permitted, the garment 
made its inventor known all over the world. But now no Parisian 
ever patronizes him; his custom is all from tourists, strangers in 
Paris, those who have been impressed with his whole-page advertise- 
ments. His prices are less than those of his rivals. Why? Because 
he has originated nothing since his first success; he has altered the 
tailor-made suit, season after season, but it is the same old idea. 
Such houses as Worth, Pingat or Laferriere spend months in the 
composition of a season's styles. Artists are employed to design the 
draperies; experiments are made with the richest of materials to ob- 
tain a new or striking effect in colors; novel combinations are sought, 
and brains are racked to devise a new waist for a debutante, a change 
in the style of trimming the bodice, or an innovation in regard to the 
skirt. ^*ot only are the regular corps of assistants engaged, but any 
one who has, or imagines she has, an idea worth adopting for a style, 
is received with eagerness and paid cash down to unfold that idea, be 
it what it may. If available.it is at once adopted, and the person 
who disclosed it to the firm receives a larger compensation for what, 
probably, was the inspiration of a glance in the glass. This is the 
composition of a dress. The tailor-made-suit man goes to no such 
expense. He makes no experiments. He waits, he sees the new 
styles, he copies them. His prices are correspondingly low, and 
probably his profits greater. He repeats himself, and his patrons are 
simply duplicate editions of each other. 

The dress, which was composed by a firm which originates the 
styles, cost five hundred francs, and was delivered in San Francisco 
in October. It was worn hereon a grand occasion. The cloak for the 
married lady reached this city about the same time. In the latter 
part of December both dresses appeared in a fashion-plate on a page 
of Harper's Bazar. By some misunderstanding permission had been 
given the firm to photograph the costume, andtney sold the picture 



But in this case San Francisco was not a year 
Di Vernon. 



to the fashion-books 
behind the times. 

The discoveries of science may well tend to make men think little 
of their physical prowess. Professor Rogers, of Washington, has 
just mathematically proved that the dynamic power of a pound of 
good steam coal is equivalent to the work of one man for a day, that 
three tons will represent his labors for twenty years, and that one 
square mile of a four foot seam will effect as much as one million 
men can do in twenty years. The era of main strength and stupidity 
is vanishing before the progress of the steam engine. It is truer now 
than ever that mind, rather than muscle, is the standard of the man. 



A WOMAN'S THOUGHTS ABOUT MEN. 
A few weeks before her death Hie aotboi --i Jo An Ha 

ave to the world n woman though U about men. Bhe pre 
mlses thai all her ubservationi mid . M ||f e have confirm- 

ed her hi one belief: thai whlh . a n rub-, thi 
potior tothe average mat U ma bio, more loveable 

tpableand reliable there are exceptional men nobler than 
anv woman, for the sfmpli il the masculine nai 

and stronger with wulei no* ibllltlea for bod, g i :tlll j evil 

blame- women for being mainly responsible 

First, their vi< ind coarseness woman being either 

rani or too cowardl) to exact Irom men the same stand i 

virtue which men expeel from them, Second, their tyram 
the laws and customs ol manj generations bave placed women far 
too much in the power of men, and even were it not bo, their own 
warm affections make them slaves, Thirdly, forjthe selfishness 
which doubtless with righteous reason i- so deeply Implanted In 
their masculine breast that ii thoroughly unselfish man i> almost a 
utfm Mrs. frail, says much thai Is wise and womanly and 
ill. she i- never unfair. For Instance, here Is a remark which 
really sums up her article: "A man's horuon i* wider, bis vision 
larger, hia physical and Intellectual strength generally greater than 
a woman's; but be i-. a- a rule, less prudent, lesscareiul, lees able to 
throw himself out of himself ami into tin- Interests of other i 
than a woman is." 

A MORAL REVIVAL. 
When the last Grand Jury dissolved without doing anything and 
the principal corruptlonists escaped punishment, there was a de- 
spondent conviction in San Francisco that the rnvm moral awaken- 
ing had accomplished nothing. Fortunately there are .signs of a pro- 
found renewal of conscience anion- the depraved classes themselves. 
The reform was like a sub-soil plow— inconspicuous on the surface, 
but breaking up the obdurate hard-pan below. All over the city there 
is a general revival of highway robbery. The removal of Mr." Peter- 
son by Officer Duff's pistol merely diversified, without cheeking the 
movement. The Mission, Hayes Valiev, the Western Addition, 
North Beach, South Park and the Barbary Coast are all . 
favored. Women going home from church and rounders going borne 
from the Maison Kiche are levied upon with conscientious impartial- 
ity. This sudden outbreak of a primitive form of industry cannol In- 
attributed to the immigration of a new criminal element. ' It musl be 
due to a change in the habits of our old predatory population. It is 
a stage of culture through which the Buckley lamb passes on bis way 
to respectability. It indicates a distinct moral elevation of the lower 
orders of society. It may not be extravagant to hope that in time 
the professions of the " lover," the primary stuffer, the straw bonds- 
man and the jury briber may become extinct, and that even the 
Blind White Devil himself may rise to the dignity of picking 

pockets. 

Reductions in Prices ! 



We respectfully announce AN ENORMOUS REDUCTION lu PRICES 
throughout our Entire Stock, and invite our Customers to call and see the 

EXTRAORDINARY BARGAINS OFFERING. 



SILKS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


PLAIN VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


FANCY VELVETS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


DRESS GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


BLACK GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


HOSIERY 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


GLOVES 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 


HOUSE-KEEPING GOODS 


AT 


REDUCED 


PRICES 



AND- 

Ladies' Muslin 



Underwear 



REDUCED PRICES. 
Packages delivered, carriage paid, in Oaklaud, Alameda and Berkeley. 




111, 113, 118, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET, 

AND 

lO, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 MORTON STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



THE NEW YORK MINING MARKET. 

New York, January 12th, 1888.— The New Year opens full of 
promise for the Wail-street miners who have been carefully nursing 
their felines during the dull closing days and months of 1887. About 
March or April, when the snows of winter shall have nulled 
away and the streets are no longer slipperv with sleets, the wise 
sohemers ol" the West, will come out of their boles and lay traps for 
the tender-feet investors of New York. For the Wall-street fieldsure 
not worked out yet— not by a large majority. The crop of fools of 
1887 has been ha'rvested and the prolits gathered; the crop of 1888 is 
progressing rapidly, and in the gentle spring-time of the year will be 
ready for the sickle. Of course, mixed with all the chaff of mining 
fraud, there will be some grains of solid, substantia] merit, and no 
doubt 1888 will bring to the front the fruition of legitimate mining 
enterprises, upon which much labor and money have been expended 
to bring them out of the simple " prospect " state into a pay Condi- 
tion. These will be gladly welcomed, but in their train and pro- 
moted by their sih'its>, will be the insatiate felines ever on the trail, 
like skulking coyotes of the plains, following nobler game and skulk- 
ing beneath their shadow. 

Among the recent mining-stocks listed is one with the somewhat 
uncouth and unpronounceable title ot Pronstite — the name of a min- 
eral of the ruby-silver family. This mine, it is claimed is located up 
in Idaho, and, according to the prospectus, is one of the few very 
SUCCUlent things that can tickle the palate of an investor. It is A 
No. 1, silver-fastened and gold-bottomed. I don't know who the en- 
gineers of the scheme are, but understand that it was incubated in 
Boston, Mass., on the relies, remains and traditions of a mining com- 
pany which long since gave up the ghost. In fact, it is an old mine 
revamped under a new name. The mine itself was a failure long 
Since, but. the new company is banking upon the fact that it owns a 
first-class ten-stamp mill. 'But the mill won't possibly do them any 
good if they haven t got any ore, and it is not probable that any gold 
and silver has sprouted since the old company abandoned the works. 
Pronstite is doing well in the Mining Exchange, all the same. It 
was bed-rocked in the Board at $1.50 per share, and being emphatically 
a box-deal, there was no difficulty in steaming it up to $3, from which 
the brokers' cross-orders have gently let it dowu and raised it up. 
The crop of suckers caught so far is small. 

Idaho, it seems, is not to have a monopoly of the big thing, for I 
hear (hat M Jack " Williams, as they call him, has reached over into 
Oregon for some of the bonanza, and located a mining property 
which he expects to place very successfully this coming Spring and 
Summer on the innocents of Wall street. Jack is a modest operator, 
and not over-grasping promoter. He has not organized under a 
sensational name. Far from it. He has chosen a soothing title for 
his Oregon mine. He dubs it the "Comfort," and he writes all his 
former investing friends to come and get some "Comfort " stock as 
a panacea for the disappointments of the past. Will they come? 
W Uliams hopes so, for this is really a good thing, he says," and he 
wants everybody to recoup losses' If the stock of the parent com- 
pany goes off too much like hot cakes, Jack will speedily prepare a 
second edition in true Taciric Coast style, for Jack is from that sec- 
tion — based upon the first northerly extension of the Comfort ledge. 
Jack owns the whole mining camp of Comfort, and there will be no 
lack of feet or " sheeres." 

Among the curios on Lower Broadway is the office of a mining 
company at the corner of Rector street. It is on the main floor, and 
the thousands of people who pass by going to or coming from the 
Elevated roads are compelled to read the four gold signs of the 
"Cleveland Tin Mining Company of the Black Hills." There are no 
shady curtains to hide the interior from the inquisitive spectator. 
Within is a small office table and four chairs. Upon the table is 
piled a mixed-up lot of what may be pounded cobble-stones or tin 
ore. Only this and nothing more. The names of the officers in let- 
ters of gold are upon the windows, but no one ever sees them within. 
It is a mining banquet hall deserted. Here are tools enough to work 
a first-class property ; the table, the chairs, the ore: needed only a 
first-class, tin-bbunil prospectus. The officers are probably hibernat- 
ing up in Dakota, and will turn up with the first balmy blossoms of 
Spring. 

Some of the innocents who about a year ago were induced to pur- 
chase some Santiago stock at about $3 per share, are very sick. For 
there isn't even a washed quotation of the stock in the Mining Board, 
where it was so promptly listed, and the alluring bait of almost im- 
mediate dividends quickly strewn broadcast over the waters. This 
was the mine that was experted by a California " engineer." It is 
located up above Panama somewhere, and is largely productive of 
gold ; at least, so it was reported. A year ago George William Ballou 
is Co. organized the Company, with William M.Lent, the veteran 
promoter, in the back-ground* The stock was bed-rocked at $2, and 
quickly advanced to $3 (because the demand was so great). For a 
tew weeks all was couleur de rote, as the French engineers say. The 
stock was very active ; reports of progress very numerous ; and 
everybody's war-cry was "Santiago and Dividends ! " Then there 
came a lull, and lull it has been ever since. Quotations there are 
none; sales there are none. The hopes of Santiago have gone " where 
the woodbine twineth ! " 

Mr. James Tichenor, better known bv his familiars as "Jim," is 
having a hard row to hoe, and all because he innocently advised 
some of his friends to buy Tuscaroras at top prices. He promised 
dividends long since, audit is awful hard for him to explain why 
things are thusly and not otherwise. Mr. Tichenor is looked upon 
here as the representative of leading Nevada mines, but unless profits 
or dividends are soon forthcoming, nis future tips are not likely to be 
taken without many grains of allowance. 

The mine operators of New York were considerably amused not 
long since at the developments of a suit over in Brooklyn, in which 
an impecunious and invisible female plaintiff sought to" render the 

Eromoters of a mining company responsible, in heavy damages, for 
aving made false representations as to the value of the property. 
The laws of New York regarding corporations are so framed as to 
afford blackmailing or squealing stockholders a splendid opportunity 
to play for " keeps." There are some lawyers here who make it a. 



special business to hunt up such clients, and then " go " for the cor- 
poration or its promoters. One of these lawyers migrated from the 
Pacific Coast a decade since, and after floating or attempting to float 
a number of wild-cats, went into the business of exposing them on 
contingent fees. This Brooklyn case was his maiden effort. This 
lawyer is no less a person than Gen. O. H. LaGrange, formerly Super- 
intendent of the San Francisco Mint. The suit was against the Santa 
Maria Company, of which Pierre Humbert, Jr., was the manager. 
The properties in Mexico were purchased on the report of Plumbert, 
on joint account with Philip Deidesheimer, the ex-bonanza expert. 
According to these two Dromios, the Santa Maria property was an- 
other Comstock. There were almost billions in sight— certainly mil- 
lions, and many of them. They captured two promoters in the per- 
sons of Alley, a Massachusetts capitalist and statesman, and Har- 
pending, a California enthusiast, who easily sees millions in sight if 
some one whom he believes in swears to it. Humbert swore to every- 
thing, and for his services received $50,000 cash and $50,000 in stock. 
Deidesheimer received only $35,000. George D. Roberts, who seems 
to have a finger in everv mine pie, was behind Humbert, and received 
$122,000, Charley MaeDermot had some kind of a lien on it, and got 
$25,000. The Mexican owners claimed to have received only $62,500. 
The company was stocked with 1,000,000 shares— par value, $25,- 
000.000. 

The promoters sold stock enough at $1 per share to get on velvet, 
and perhaps a little more too. Among others, Frederick Billings, 
formerly a wealthy lawyer of San Francisco, invested $300,000 on the 
strength of what Humbert told him of the millions in sight, and the 
promoters' representations that the property cost a million dollars. 
Humbert induced his old uncle, his cousin, R. E. Kobbins, a wealthy 
Boston man, and numerous friends, to buy the promoters' stock. A 
big mill — 60 stamps — was contracted for through Malter, Lind & Co., 
and when it was ready to start the bubble burst— there was no ore. 
The uew Comstock "existed entirely in the imagination of Humbert 
and Deidesheimer. Post experts sent down reported nothing in sight. 
That was another illustration of the fore-sight and hind-sight busi- 
ness in mine speculation. LaGrange's client was a poor woman, 
who held 400 shares of stock. That is, she was nominally his client, 
but behind her were grouped in eager, anxious array, Billings, Rob- 
bins, Humbert's relatives, and all the other fellows who had purchased 
stock. They prayed that the promoters divide their profits among 
them. There were seven or eight attorneys for all these hidden 
plaintiffs, while the defendants nad the services of Bob Ingersoll, 
who made the fur fly when Humbert got on the stand to revamp his 
old lies. The case stands or falls by Humbert's testimony. Being a 
kind of what they call an equity "case, it was tried before a Judge 
alone, and it will be argued and considered at his leisure. The class 
of cases of which this is one, have done much harm to mining inter- 
ests in New York, where " squealers " muchabound. A clever lawyer 
noses them out, and soon a prima facie case, sounding in fraud and 
swelling in damages, is made out. 

The latest gilt-edge scheme is that just placed on mining lunch- 
counters, labeled " The Extension Gold Mining Company, " and 
fathered specially, I believe, by one " Professor Bibbins." This com- 
pany banks on the strength* of its near relationship to the famous 
Plymouth mine (it being, as the Professor asserts, the south exten- 
sion of that big property). Something like the Brunswick being the 
extension of the Idaho. The relationship is probably distant. The 
Extension scheme is formulated in the following seductive style : 
Twenty-stamp mill, crushing 50 tons of ore per day, at a low 

average of $12 per ton $ 600 

Deducting cost of mining and milling, $2,50 per ton 125 

Leaving a net profit per day ..$ 475 

Leaving a uet profit per month 13,250 

Equal to a yearly net revenue of 171.000 

Very nice on paper, eh? The mill is to come out of sales of a very- 
limited number of shares at $1.25, all the $1 stock having been sold. 
The original Plymouth claims only $7 rock; the Extension sees that 
and goes $5 better. I venture to say that if the Extension has " a 50- 
foot vein" and " an abundance of $12-ore," that they can sell their 
stock right in Amador county at a big advance. There is nothing in 
the prospectus to show how many shares there are in the company. 
There is a good demand for Comstocks in this market, but, as'a 
rule, mining shares are dull of sale. The public are tired. They 
must needs have a little rest. g. f. b. 



Visitors to our city troubled with defective sight consult C. Muller, 
the expert optician, 135 Montgomery, near Bush. 

STEAM BOILER INCRUSTATIONS. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, hy the Use of the 

Llewellyn Filter-Heater and Condenser! 

(Over 300 In Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering tae Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cat. [Sept. 11. 

E. L. 6. STEELE & CO., 

(Successors to C. ADOLPHE LOW A CO.), 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

— AGENTS— 

American Sugar Refinery and Washington Salmon Cannery. 



Jan. > L88fi 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE NEW HEALTH OFFICER. 
Th* city at last hu a Health Officer, and !■ to be oonfcratulatod 
■ r enters upon i niti l Important office nt an 
ptionallj 'mi d [| & slnrpn . to be wished tbal be 

■lit man In the right pin o Beta a man* 
it- attainments, .1 gentleman ol pleading address, and an ex 
• •t physician. Above all, he Is not i polltioian nor i\ wire- 
He will keep his position by merit il be can, And retire from 
It when he can no longer hold it with ring his seif-n 

With these \ negative qualities, there is no reason why he 

should nut make the administration of the Health Department what 
i! never baa been, but what it ought to bo, Whether he possesses 
thii push, energy, fertility <>i resources ami administrative ability 
which are demanded by the exceptional requirements <-i the place, 
remains t<> be proved. There are persons friendly to him who fear 
that he may fail in those particulars. To be > ire warned i~ to !"■ fore 
armed. Tin' office upon which he enters may well, at this time, draw 
the latent energy that is in him. it may turn out thai behind 
his quid and sedate exterior there is an amount of reserve force that 
\ thin- that is needed at this juncture. Assuredly 
he is face to face with nn-re than enough work t" ■!". The riealtn 
i (fflce wants thoroughly reorganising. It ha long been tin- abode of 
official drones, vrhose -'>!<• activity consisted j M pulling wires to keep 
themselves in place. The riealtn Officer is virtually tin- Health De- 
partment. It he he efficient, it matters but little what the Board is. 
It he be listless and supine, the Board. however active ami intelligent, 

cannot make g 1 his deficiencies. It is an unpaid, advisory body, 

nothing more. The chief executive officer may search out the tart's, 

report them, ami seek advice, but if he fail iti any of these respects, 

the Board can do but little. .lust now there Is work for the Health 

Officer on every hand. The eas,.s ,,f small-pox for the first three 

weeks of this month amounted to iti. That is a bad showing unci 

indicates that the epidemic is not yet strangled. It is to the discredit 

citj and it- Health Department that diphtheria and typhoid 

entirely preventable diseases are ail too common. Nuisnnce.s 

t abated as they ought to be; property owners in parts of the 

city are not made t<i do their duty as the} should; ami Chinatown 

can be made clean and decent if the Health Officer will but exercise 

the powers vested in him by law for that purpose. L>r. Barger has a 

^raud Opportunity to win name and fame for himself. 



CLARA BELLE. 

Clara Belle McDonald's acquittal of the charge of attempting to 

murder her father-in-law has taken nobody who knows anything of 

San PrancisCO juries by surprise. A woman, young and fairly l' I 

looking, her triumphant escape from the ronsequences of her act was 
never tor a moment in doubt, a recent European visitor asked the 
guide who was conducting him through San Quentin prison: " How 
ta it that nearly all your California^ prisoners are males?" The 
official replied: "We have hetter use for women in California than 
to -end them to tin- penitentiary." As to the *' better use " there is 
room for douht, hut the way in which we let loose our Laura D. Fairs 
and Clara Belle McDonalds is evidence that, whatever their use— and 
1 1 r;i vrn only knows what it <an he — they have no purpose to serve in 
deterring others from following their murderous and otherwise law- 
less and shocking example. If a woman hut he pretty and piquant, 
dressy and dashing, she cannot he convicted of anything in this city. 
Yet the female heart is not so free from guile as to be incapable of 
Crime. It is true that fewer women than men go criminally wrong, 
but it is equally true that when a woman once abandons h'erself to 
crime she is more daring and more reckless of consequences than a 
man. In this very case of Clara Belle, the ''recklessness of conse- 
quences" was conspicuously apparent, but, strange to say, it was 
urged and accepted as the principal ground for extending her im- 
munity from eonsecpuenees. That her crime was boasted of and pre- 
meditated is, of course, true, but it is a new doctrine that threats and 
pre determination take the guilt out of acts that are in themselves 
criminal. There was practically no defense in her ease, except that 
she was a young and pretty woman, and that sufficed. Sympathy, 
that was not as well placed as it might have been, took the place of 
reason, ami law and justice were dethroned. More might be said, 
but we forbear. Good citizens are ashamed of the whole proceeding, 
and desire to forget it as soon as possible. 

MICROBES AND DOCTORS. 
The present small-pox boom is largely a physician's epidemic. 
It owes its existence to professional carelessness, and medical nurs- 
ing has given it its remarkable longevity. At any time since the 
beginning it could have been stamped out within one week after the 
adoption of thoroughgoing scientific measures; yet now, after it has 
been leisurely progressing for months, the health authorities are pot- 
tering over schemes for heading it off, like babies tugging at a New 
Foundland dog. The pest-house ambulances have been industri- 
ously engaged in spreading small-pox bacilli in every locality that 
would harbor them. Vaccination has been carried on with the easy 
carelessness of a distribution of liver-pad circulars, Physicians 
know well enough that the first operation in any case is likely to be a 
failure, but they do not ask their patients to return for inspection. 
Sometimes, indeed, they take an interest in the success of the opera- 
tion. A prominent Oakland practitioner, who runs a private hos- 
pital of his own, takes the scabs from adult patients for use in subse- 
quent vaccinations. Of course the best medical opinion holds 
vaccination with anything but bovine virus to be criminal, and even 
where the use of human matter is permitted, it is always supposed 
to be taken from an infant. But bovine points cost about ten cents 
apiece and a scab from a grown human subject of unknown antecedents 
costs nothing. Naturally a few other diseases, each worse than small- 
pox, might be transmitted in this way, but that would merely mean 
more fees for the physician. It is only quacks that advertise " no 
cure, no pay." It is said that 80 per cent of our population, or 
250,000 people, have been vaccinated since the scare began. It would 
be interesting to compare these figures with the number of points 
sent here from vaccine farms. 



Grand Auction Sale 

— or— 

S. &c Or. GUMP'S 

French and German Importation and Collection of 

OIL PAINTINGS, 

FRENCH BRONZES AND ITALIAN MARBLE BUSTS, 

On Tuesday, January 31st, and Wednesday, February 1st, 

at 7:80 O'CLOCK 1 v II kvkninu, 
At the S. F. Art Association Parlors, 430 Pine, below Kearny St. 

This CoUeoUon Is beyond a doubt thi be I aver offered at pnbll ic 

i m. hi ni till- city. We desire all lovers aud connoisseurs ..f line an to 
tin- 1 inn,'.. Collection, in the Collection mil be round 

" Entering the Convent," by J. Rougier. 

This Celebrated Painting reeclved tbe Medal si the Paris Salon In 1887. 
Value, 16,000. 

"The Duke's Visit to the Village Tavern," by 

Cesar-e Detti ; "The Gallant Friar," by A. Hum- 

borg; "The Life Boat," by George Haquette. 

Free Exhibition olthc above Qcmsol Art will oomi " n Wednesday, 

January 25th, at9o'clock a. h., and continue day and evening, at the Art 

Ah.Mirnitiuii Parlors, until anil .luring the Auction Bales, 



Jan. 21.1 



Easton, Eldridge & Co., 

Auctioneers. 



HZOTEL WINDSOR, 

(I.ATK ARMY AND NAVY), 

Victoria Street, London, S. W. 

280 APARTMENTS. 

::E LIECTIRIC LIGH T:; 

T-curlsisli. and S'wimmira.g' Batiks. 
Oct. 15.] J. R. CLEAVE, Manager. 



PARAISO SPRINGS! 

MONTEREY COUNTY, OAL., 

the ca-irxjSB-a-io of -a.^eei^ic^- ! 

NEW MANAGEMENT! NEW IMPROVEMENTS! 
The most Beautiful, most Invigorating, most Easy of Access of all Min- 
eral Spring Resorts— 1,500 feet above the sea level. Take San Jose Cars, 
8:30 morning, and arrive at Springs at dinner. 

J. G. FOSTER, Proprietor. 

ED. FOSTER. Asst. Manager. 

Jiy- Tel egraph, Express an d Postofllces. [Feb. 10. 



ST. J-A.MES HOTEL, 

SAN JOSE, GAL. 
TYLER BEACH, Proprietor. 

This Hotel is elegantly furnished, with all Modern Improvements. The 
rooms are large, airy, and beautifully situated in front of St. James Park, 
next door to the Court House. No expend lias beeu spared in making this 
a First-Class Hotel in every respect. 

AMERICAN PLAN. Rates, 4*2.00 to $2.50 per day. Special Prices by the 
Week or Mouth. Coach and Carriage at Depot on arrival of all Trains. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 
A Quiet House of Peculiar Excellence. 

ARMY AND NAV HEADQUARTERS. 

jan.7.! WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



RAHTJEN'S COMPOSITION 



IRON AND WOODEN 8HIP BOTTOMS, 
Which protects them against Bust and Fouling, keeping their surface 
smooth aud slippery for one year. 

E. W. TRAVERS, Agent, 

Dec. 3.J No. 10 Market Street, San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



THE SHADOW. 

" I like the location," said Miss Patty Lockland. " Delicious sea- 
air, tine view and a bathing house attached to the premises,. To be 
sure the house is small, but then the rent is proportionally low. The 
furniture is old-fashioned and scanty, but that makes no very great 
difference to me. I can easily hire what I want from Sibbesbort. 
Girls, what do you think?" Lucy Barr, Miss Lockland's eldest 
niece, hesitated a little. 

11 Isn't it rather dull, Aunt Patty? " "Can't expect high carnival 
in the country, my dear. We came here for Dotty's health, not for 
society." Dotty herself—" short " for Dorothy— clung close to Aunt 
Patty's arm. "Don't you think the sea makes an awful roaring, 
Aunt Patty?" whispered she. " It's the nature of the sea, my dear. 
Here, you "fellow with the key," to a stunted, stout-built man who 
was attending the party over the premises, " you may tell the agent 
I'll take the place for one year." 

" Well, ma'am, just as you please," said Milo Renney, twisting his 
head mysteriously around. " But it ain't every one as would care to 
take Shore Cottage." " Why not? " sharply demanded Miss Lock- 
land. Renney twisted his head still more solemnly. " I'm a poor, 
sea-faring man, ma'am, with my livin' to get," said be, " and it ain't 
for me to be a-runnin : down other folk's property. But the truth is 
the truth, and I ain't one to see folks imposed upon. No, that I 
ain't." "Man alive! why don't you speak out and have done with 
it? "said Miss Lockland. " What ails the property ? Cellar damp?" 
" No'm. 'Taint that." " Roof leaky? " " Pretty tol'able sound, so 
far's 1 know," grunted Renney.' "Then what is there against the 
house? " " Haunted, ma'am ! " said the sailor, dropping his voice to 
a sepulchral cadence. " Fiddlesticks! " shrieked Miss Lockland. "Do 
you take me for a baby or a nursery maid ? " 

" Every one'll tell you the same story, ma'am," doggedly persisted 
Milo. "The man as built the cottage had two wives, savin' the 
young ladies' preseme, ma'am. One of 'em he kept here and t'other 
one lived in great style in the city. And the one as lived here died 
awful sudden. Folks says she was poisoned. They buried her down 
in the cemetery beyond them evergreens — and she walks every moon- 
light night." "Walks, does she?" said Miss Lockland. " I'll make 
her walk livelier than ever she did before if I come across one of her 
promenades." "Ah, but you never seen a ghost, ma'am." "Did 
you?" demanded Miss Lockland, turning sharply upon him. 
" Many a time, ma'am, at the full of the moon, when I've been com- 
ing in with my fishing-smack, nutterin' past the empty windows, 
ma'am, till it made my blood run cold." 

" Then you haven't the common sense I gave you credit for," said 
Miss Lockland. "And I ain't the oidy one as has seen the White 

Shadow, ma'am. There's old Ned Stapleton, ma'am " "There, 

there," said Miss Lockland, imperatively silencing him. " My girls' 
eyes are twice their regulation size already. Tell the agent exactly 
what I said— that I'll take Shore Cottage for a year. As for the 
ghosts, they turn out when I turn in, or I'll know the reason why. 
And there's one indisputable advantage in ghosts— tbey make rent 
cheap." And accordingly, just one week from that bright September 
afternoon, Miss Patty Lockland sat knitting by the twilight fire in 
the low-ceiled drawing-room of Shore Cottage, whose windows look- 
ed out upon the trembling waves, with a red crescent moon hanging 
low in the horizon. 

" This is what I call snug," said Miss Patty, as Nora, the red-arm- 
ed maid-of-all-work, brought in the tea-tray. "Do you think so, 
aunt?" said Dottie, shivering a little. "What a strange noise that 
is! I'm sure some one is tapping at the window." " Its only the 
trails of ivy growing around that north casement, my dear," said Aunt 
Patty, calmly. " 1 must trim it to-morrow a little. It's picturesque, 
but inconvenient." " Plase, ma'am," said Nora, edging up closer to 
the table and the firelight, "is it true about the ghosts? " " It's only 
a pack of nonsense, Nora," said Miss Lockland, " and you're a goose 
for listening to it." " But that was dreadful noises about the place 
last night, mem," persisted Nora. " Shutters creaking and old Ren- 
ney's dogs barking — that's all," said Miss Lockland. 

"Aunt Patty," cried Lucy, " what is that white thing down under 
the hill? It looks like an arm beckoning! " "Mist, my dear, rising 
out of the valley." "No, but the other white thing. Look! look! 
it's moving! " 

Nora uttered an eldritch howl and got behind her mistress. Lucy 
and Dottie clung close together. "You geese!" cried Aunt Patty, 
with a contagious peal of laughter, "it's old Renney's white cow 
coming home to be milked. Look for vourselves if you don't believe 
it." " Be the bones of the howly St* Patrick, it's that and nothin' 
more! " said Nora. And she went back to her kitchen with renewed 
courage, while Lucy and Dotty confessed how foolishly credulous 
they had been. "Of course there are no such things as real ghosts," 
said Lucy. "But a person can't help being nervous," said Dotty. 
" You never would have thought of the thing if it hadn't been for old 
Renney," said Aunt Patty. "I wish he liad held his ridiculous 
tongue!" 

But in the middle of the night Aunt Patty herself was roused by a 
sound that was neither creaking shutters, tapping ivy nor mice scut- 
tling across the floor before the rush of some avenging cat. " It's 
just like an iron chain rattling in the ball beyond," said Aunt Patty, 
sitting up in bed, and turning back the frill of her night cap from her 
ear, in order that she might the better listen. " Tnere it goes again. 
I must look into this business." To spring out of bed and light her 
night-lamp was the work of but one second — to wrap herself in the 
folds of a voluminous gray flannel dressing-gown was another; and 
Miss Lockland bounced out into the hall. As she opened the door 
the draught blew out the light, but by the starlight she could see, at 
the other end of the entry, a tall, "white figure slowly advaneing 
toward her. 

" Who are you?" valorously demanded Aunt Patty. And a dis- 
mal groan replied. " What kind of an answer is that?" cried Miss 
Patty. But only a second groan could she elicit. "Come!" said 
Aunt Patty, "I mean to be at the bottom of this thing." And in- 
stead of j-etreatiug in a paroxysm of blind terror, as the sepulchral 
visitant evidently expected she would do, the resolute spinster march- 



ed straight up to it, seized it by the shoulders, and shook it until its 
teeth rattled in its head equal to the iron chain. 

" Don't, e-e, now ! Let a fellow alone ! " roared the ghost, in vain 
endeavoring to wriggle out of Miss Patty's iron grasp. "I know 
you! " said Miss Patty, knocking off the white wig with a deft motion 
of her left elbow. " I've seen that red shock of hair before! You're 
Milo Renney's oldest boy." " Lemme go ! " sullenly snarled the lad. 
" Not until you tell me what all this masquerading nonsense is for." 

" It was dad," reluctantly confessed the buy. "He made me! He 
didirt want the Shore Cottage to be let." "And why not? No— you 
needn't squirm about — you can't get away. Why net? I say, unless 
you prefer answering before a magistrate." "Because," whined the 
boy, " the cellar was handy to store away the whisky and tobacco the 
Ltn-cl.if Nunc;/ brought every three weeks. And dad he has a part 
share in the smugglin' business, and the ghost was the only thing to 
keep the folks away. Now, come ! Lemme go, I say ! " " Yes, I'll 
let you go for to-night," said Aunt Patty. " But this isn't the end of 
the affair by any means." 

" You wouldn't be so hard on poor folks, as to complain on us!" 
cried the boy. " Dad '11 most murder me, anyway." "I'll do pre- 
cisely as 1 please." said Miss Lockland. The next day she walked 
down to Milo Renney's fishing-cabbin, and had a long talk with him 
— the upshot of which was that the ghost of Shore Cottage was final- 
ly exorcised. No more mysterious sights and sounds disturbed the 
dwellers beneath its peaceful roof. Kven Nora began to go up and 
down the long entries at twilight without a lamp, and Dotty's roses 
came back once more, while Lucy laughed at her former fear. But 
Aunt Lockland and Milo Renney kept their secret. The smuggling 
business had come to an untimely end, and the white shadow had 
vanished forever more. — New York News. 

Santa Cruz Suburban and Seaside Building Sites still at reasonable 
prices. Also, Vineyards, Orchards and Fruit Lauds totally independent of 
irrigation. Iu a climate of the very happiest medium, surrounded by ex- 
quisite scenery. Illustrated Price List free by mail. Address 

Efc/taii'fv ami. Mart, Santa Cruz, Cal. 



:B_A_:r>r:K:s- 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Brown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr . . . Assistant Cashier 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bauk; CHICAGO— Union National Bauk; ST. LOUIS— Boatman'B 
Saving Bauk ; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in Loudon — Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sous. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bauk has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents iu all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Fraukfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italv and Switzerland. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN^FRANcFsCO^ 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

RESERVE 1,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 
JAMES G. PAIR. JAS. C. FLOOD, JNO. W. MAOKAY, 
R. H, FOLLIS, JO HN BIGELOW. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY^BANKING~DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,000,000 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Te vis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [Aug. 6. 

hum boldt"savTngs~ Al«D~L0AN society. 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER ... .President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. [Dec 31. 

^ nevadT 'warehouse andTock company. ~ 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, -supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
lusurauce effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 
Office of the Company, 412 PINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. [Nov. iy 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY. 

No. 310 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN^ FURS. 

Frlincc* Pvtm V\r\i S The Hi e hest Grade champagne. 

LUipbe LAUd Uiy ^KqaaltotheBest. 



Jan. >. 1888 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



THE TRUTH ABOUT SEWARD'S SNOW FARM.'" 
Whi ■ Seward acnuired Alu*ka from Russia tho jokes 

Innumerable thai bo had pui luisi I nothing but a vast snow 
(arm, but are now know thai he roallj raluable acquisition. 

The -lav |a nol far distant when . Mask. m pnMtuota will out a remark- 
able figure in the natlon'a commerce. » i»n>itlcr»blc has been 
plisheo irithin the paal two or three year*; enough, in point ol 
demonstrate thai there is a great future in * tore for tin- new Territory. 
Reports ol thi Id art- being brought in continually 

ir..iu all points reached o\ explorers, and the country seems t" be one 

>ld mine. The Great Paris Quartz Mine, during the past two 
years, has yielded over $2,000,000, and nut much more than a per 
ceptible scratch has yel been made on the vast ledge uncovered. 
Governor Bwineford, in hi- report jusl published, says thai import- 
ant discoveries «-t placer mines have been made in the Stew- 
art river and the Yukon headwaters territory, and thai the miners 
would not work a bar that did nol paj $10 a day per man, using 
>'iil\ a riH-krr. There have been numerous discoveries ol coal, ana 
the turn ■ when we -hall draw nearly ail our supply from 
thai region. The estimated value of the fisheries of Alaska for i-> s 7 

O.oi n*. There are nine salmon canneries, which Bent out 11,- 

I'-.iiihU. Some idea "i tin- importance the rod and salmon 

fisheries are likely to attain in the not very far distant future, may he 

gathered from the statement that the whole coast, from Discon's en- 

"ii the south to and beyond Behring's straits on the north, in- 
cluding the islands, with a sea frontage ol 25,000 miles, is one great 
reservoir of fish. The cod hank- alone are worth more than the 
Government paid for the whole Territory, and they art- all within 
reach of safe and commodious harbors, and transportation East via 
the Canadian and Northern Pacific railroads is now easy. The popu- 
lation of Masks, consisting of whites, bulf -breeds and natives, is 
1 800. The four principal exports are furs, fish, gold 
and lumber, which footed up during 1SS7 as follows ; Furs, $2,500,000: 
150,000 b $3,000,000; lumber, $100,000; making a total 

060,000. Tin. 1 indications are that the output of gold will he 
trebled during 1888. The prospective wealth of Alaska's almost in- 
terminable forests ol spruce pine, cedar, hemlock, etc., ran Bcarcelj 
in- over-estimated. There are scarcely any fee simple land titles in 
the Territory a- yet. The squatters are awaiting Congressional action 
to enable them to acquire freeholds. Little has been attempted in 
the way of agriculture, but there is abundant opportunity for the 
cultivation of most all cereals (except corn) and ot all garden veget- 
Cn the inland Yukon region the Winter's cold is counterbal- 
anced by the Summer's correspondingly bigta temperature. There 
are abundant of opportunities for profitable stork raising, as good 
pasture abounds. The temperature of southeastern Alaska, and of 
southwestern so far as known. Is mild and salubrious. During the 
past year the extremes of temperature have been 77 deg. above and 

below, and the mean annual 13.2 deg. It was recently stated 
that Mr. Chamberlain was willing to withdraw ail claims to Behring 
straits being an open sea. in return for some concession in regard to 
the Canadian fisheries. That bargain ought to be struck right away. 
The figures we have given are from Governor Swineford's official re- 
port for 1887. Manifestly Alaska has a future and a big one. 

PRESIDENTIAL POETRY. 
The Lick Telescope of the press has just discovered a new star 
in the poetical galaxy, .lames Buchanan's political rank has hith- 
erto obscured his lyrical genius, and literary fame has come only 
after deatli has blighted the power to enjoy it. It was love that 
ca'used Buchanan's youthful soul to burst into song with this impas- 
sioned description of his divinity: 

" Her teeth were white as the ivory showed, 
Ami her breath was spice wherever it flowed. 

Her father was cruel ; 
A siglit of me he could not endure. 
The reason why— because I was poor. 
I dast not enter the dwelling 
Where dwells my jewel." 
This poem bears the birth-mark of genius on its face. It defies ac- 
curate classification. It bears some resemblance to the more serious 
works of Fred Emerson Brooks, but not enough to permit us to 
trace a generic connection between the two masters. There are fea- 
tures in it which remind us of the higher flights of Ella Sterling 
Cummings. Substitute Tarn a [pais for Lititia Duncan as the subject 
of the song, and there would be a close approximation to the fervid 
style of that old mistress of art. There are some suggestions of 
Adair Weleker. the Sacramento Shakspeare, but the ex-President's 
ode smacks of the soil with a homely plebeian vigor that is lacking 
in the polished works of the California bard. " I dast not enter," for 
instance, is a flight upon which Mr. Weleker would have been afraid 
to venture. No man whose father had been a Berkeley professor 
would have "dast "to use a term so redolent of the plain people. 
Mr. Buchanan's poetical laurels are of a type that stands alone. 

A pupil in one of the public schools of this city complied recently 
in the following manner with a request to write a composition on the 
subject of a physiological lecture to which the school had just lis- 
tened: "The human body is made up of the head, thorax and the 
abdomen. The head contains the brains, when there is any. The 
thorax contains the heart and the lungs. The abdomen contains the 
bowels, of which there are five. A, E, I. O, IT, and sometimes W and 
Y; but if you want a beautiful photograph, you must go to Taber, 
No. 8 Montgomery street." 

The " Scientific American," published by Munn &Co., New York, 
presents weekly to its readers the best and most reliable record of 
various improvements in machinery, while the scientific progress of 
the country can in no way be gleaned so well as by the regular peru- 
sal of its pages. 

Old and ueliable institution: Muller's optical depot, 135 Montgomery 
street, near Bush. 



BA.asrics- 



THE 6ERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
i'M imi vu ui u.uimik. 

No. 526 California Street. San FranclMO. 
•rd ol Dlraol 

',"<"' '"•■; » 'J".',""'!' ' ■'« Kr,,-. ..... .11 !„..,, N Vault,.,.. 

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SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300 000 

OFFICERS: 

President JBROME LINCOLN I SeoretaWT 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vloe-Preaidonl W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V riMlTll 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securn 

OFFICE-No. 228 Montgomcr, Street. San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

NEW ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION (LIMITED). 

CAPITAL £2.000.000 | Subscribed and Paid Up £600,000 

HEAD 0FF/CE-40 THREADNEEDLE STREET. LONDON. 

Bankers— Union Bank of London (Limited] and Bank of Scotland. 

Edinburgh Agency— 23 St. Au.lr.w Square. 

Bbancmiks— Htiiiii-ny, ruifiuta, Cnl.tinhi,, Madras. uurlUuB, Hongkong 

Shanghai, Singapore, Yokohama, in Au>iniliaat Melbourne and Byduej 

The Bank Buys and Sells Hills of Exchange, makes Telegraphic Trail 
Issues Letters of Credit and circular Notes available throughout the world, 
forwards Bills for Collection, undertaken the Purchase am] Sale of Secu- 
rities, holds them for safe custody, and realizes interests and dividends, 
Collects Pay and Pensii.ii>, Pay8 Insurance Premiums ami Club Bubscrlp 

ttons, and Transacts Banking ami Agency Business generally. 

Fixed Deposits received for upwards of 12 months at 5 per cent, and at 

correspondingly fiL\-i.rai.ie rates i'"i- shorter periods. 

The fullest Information can be obtained by application at any of the 
branches and agencies, or at the head office. 

Sept 24. j GEQKGE William Thomson, Secretary. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

322 PINE STREET. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

DIRCCTORS : 
CHAS. CROCKER, | B. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOL-WORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN.. Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

[Oct, 2SJ _ 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital $3,100,000 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bauk. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgau & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bauk. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in Loudon aud Sau Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. June 9. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

205 Sansome Street 

Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $150,000. 

Head Office 9 aud 10, Tokenhouse Yard, Loth bury, Loudon 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the Loudon, Paris aud American Bauk 
(Ltd.), 46 Exchange Place. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres ACle, 17 Boulevard 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, | Mmm.™™ 

EUGENE MEYER,! Manager*,. 
C. Altschul, Cas hier. „__ [Ma rch '26. 

~THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT— J. W. Scllgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, J6 000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange aud bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, j „.„„.., 

IGN. STElNHART.l Managers. 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. [March 26. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $1,875,000 

RESERVE FUND 450,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanaimo and 

Kamloops, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, aud upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bauk of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico aud South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Bank o 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Compauyof Sydney, Euglish, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bauk aud National Bauk of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. [March 26. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." Tom Moore. 

Alfred Cflllier is a musician in whose musical thoughts the poetical 
character predominates. As a composer of theatrical works, he lacks 
an important quality, that of practical effectiveness. He disdains to 
sacrifice theoretical form or classical development for the sake of dra- 
matic emphasis or comic effect. He is too great a purist as a com- 
poser to ever attain the first rank of musical writers in the modern 
school of serio-comic operetta. Cellier's music is distinctively Eng- 
lish in character. He occasionally indulges in a waltz movement or 
a quickstep tempo, but generally speaking be confines himself to the 
measured rhythms of the English composers of the past. In melody 
he is primarily delicate, dainty and poetical. In concerted develop- 
ment he prefers simple choral effects. In orchestral elaboration he 
evidences again the predominance in his mind of theoretical over 
practical knowledge. He gives to the instruments elaborate work of 
a delicious character, but it is work that does not assert itself. As a 
result of these different characteristics, Cellier's music, while charm- 
ing and delightful, is in a measure monotonous. It is music which 
is certain to please the musically educated, but its success with the 
general public is doubtful. It is this fact which relegates Cellier as a 
composer of operetta to an inferior rank. This fact may be stated in 
different ways, most of which might redound to Cellier s credit as a 
musician pure and simple, but the only conclusion that can be ar- 
rived at, is that to be a great operetta composer one must compose 
effective operretta music. Cellier has furnished the scores to many 
libretti; but until the success of Dorothy, none of them had obtained 
a hold on the public. The success of the pretty pastoral induced 
London managers to revive several of these former works, among 
them The Sultan of Mocha, a decidedly tame composition. A recent 
hearing of that operetta has helped to arrive at a consideration of 
Cellier as a composer. 

***** 

Dorothy is called a prettv pastoral, and no better designation could 
be found for it. It is a little story of the eighteenth century— a tale 
of country life rudely disturbed by townsfolk with town ideas and 
customs. The English stage has myriads of plays of all kinds based 
on just such plots, with village rustics, town gallants, wenches and 
ladies, bluff squires, yokels and sheriffs' officers galore. B. C. 
Stephenson, the librettist of Dorothy, has not written a particularly 
original story, but neither has he fallen into extreme commonplace, 
and he has furnished a well diversified series of incidents for musical 
elaboration, forming a libretto which , considering Cellier's character- 
istics as a composer, could hardly be improved upon. The result is 
a felicitous one. But for tbe comedy, or rather farce scenes, this 
work would have almost an idyllic character. It is not necessary to 
enumerate the different musical gems of the score. It will do to say 
that the score is full of dainty melody. The waltz motif is one that 
will not allow itself to be forgotten. It will ever be remembered as 
an index iu the remembrance of the operetta. 

****** 

The first performance, on Monday evening, was a remarkably good 
one for a premiere. Lily Post sings tbe music of Dorothy very nicely. 
Her personality is somewhat hard for the character. Fannie Rice, 
with her inherent charm, makes a dainty little woman of Lydia. In 
their trains, with powdered wigs, the two are types of female beauty. 
Carleton and Taylor sing with spirit and act with a creditable appre- 
ciation of the humor of the operetta. J. H. Murray, the young bari- 
tone who was one of the agreeable features of the Thompson Opera- 
Comique Company which appeared at the California Theatre last 
year, has improved in voice and method since then. The score' 
allots to the part of the Squire, which Murray takes, a very effective 
song in the second act. Murray sings it with good effect. His voice 
is of good quality, pure and fresh, but lacking somewhat in carrying 
power. The fun of the operetta is in the hands of Larcber, a sher- 
iffs officer, and Mrs. Pivett, a susceptible aged widow. Clara Wis- 
dom, who has become a comedienne, makes the most of her oppor- 
tunities. Drew, as Larcber, is very funny, but principally by absurd 
gags which are not en rapport with the place, period and character of 
the operetta. Still, in such cases the comedian is everywhere allowed 
great latitude, and it is perhaps uncalled for to be severe. Rose 
Beaudet is too " dignified and stately " as Phyllis, the inn-keeper's 
daughter. In the first act the two young ladies from the hall are 
masquerading as wenches, and plead with I'hillis to keep their 
secret. It requires the dialogue to remove tbe impression that it is 
not Phyllis who is masquerading. The chorus do their share ad- 
mirably. 

***** 

In A Dark Secret there is introduced what is perhaps the most real- 
istic of realistic effects ever attempted on the stage. The river 
Thames, on which two whole acts ot the melodrama s action occur, 
is represented by a body of water covering over two thousand square 
feet. The result obtained is not commensurate with the ingenuity 
which devised the effect and the trouble and expense which its exe- 
cution entails. Still, two scenes, the regatta and the moonlight row 
with the rescue by the hero of a drowning woman, were very striking, 
and a similar effect could not have been obtained by any other means. 
It is a pity that the tank could not have been so arranged as to make 
the surface of the water visible all over the auditorium. The fore- 

f;round might have been made to more properly represent a river's 
>ank. This would have added to the picturesque side of the realism. 
Of the play itself, nothing can be said in praise. It is a very bad 
specimen of a very bad class of plays — the so-called modern English 
melodramas. If Lewis Morrison's Stephen be excepted, it must be 
said that it is very well acted. Morrison totally misconceives the 
character. Such an individual as he makes Stephen could not be a 

fentleman sport — an amateur rowing champion. Miss Rosabel 
lorrison is a charmingly natural young girl. That by itself is a sign 
of great promise for her future. Miss Annie Mayer has a character- 
less sort of woman to represent, which gives her no opportunity to 
exhibit her abilities. Frank Carlyle is a handsome, manly fellow, 
who is no doubt capable of doing more than the part of Martin Brooke 



calls for. It is sufficient for him to look manly and athletic, with the 
proper sporting chic, and to take the rescuing dive with dash and 
grace — and he fills all the requirements. Jean Clara Walters was 
never intended for a subtle character part. It is to be hoped, after 
the fulsome flattery which is showered on Peterson, the local cham- 

Eion of the oar, by every one in the play, that he will not surrender 
is laurels to his Canadian opponent in the coming race. 

*■"*** 

Hermlnie belongs to a now almost obsolete class of plays. It is a 
pure melodrama of the old school, which contented itself to be emo- 
tional without regard to plausibility or probability. Tbe new school 
is satisfied to be scenically realistic, and is equally indifferent as to 
the other qualities. The principal thing that is to be observed in the 
acting of the Redmund Barry Company is its mechanical conscien- 
tiousness. It is acting by rule and law— the rule and law of a tradi- 
tionary school. Viewed" by such a light, there are no faults to find. 
Yet it is a species of acting, the survival of which would be an 
artistic calamity. It is devoid of imagination, of spontaneity, of in- 
dividuality. As an opportunity of studying abandoned methods of 
acting, the performances of this company have been very interesting. 
***** 

At the Alcazar Baird's Minstrels have been giving a very strong 
exhibition of modern negro minstrelsy. The company is a first class 
one in every respect. 

* * * * * 

The Village Cotpictte is a pleasant entertainment, and makes an 
evening pass most agreeably at the Tivoli. 

***** 

Henry Heyman's third Chamber Music Recital was given last 
night. 

***** 

At her concert, next Mondaj r evening, Mme. Louisa Pyk will be as- 
sisted by Miss Alice Bacon and the Brandt quartette. Mme. Pyk will 
sing the Oberon aria, "Ocean, Thou Mighty Monster," Norwegian 
songs by Oreig, the Nozze de Figaro aria, songs by Brahms and Schu- 
bert, and Swedish Folksleider. Beai'clerc. 



Madame Inez Fabbri-Muller respectfully informs the musical 
public of San Francisco that her new vocal classes commenced at her 
Studio, 1008 Post street, above Larkin, on Wednesday, January 3d, 
1888. Pupils received daily from 2 to 4 o'clock p. m., for trying of the 
voice. 

Those who desire first-class instruction in vocal or instrumental music, 
conversational or declamatory elocution, or anything else that pertains to 
lyric or dramatic stage, are recommended to call upon Mrs. Julia Melville- 
Suyder. This lady has prepared a long list of ladies and gentlemen for the 
stage, each of whom has made his or her mark in the profession. 

~~ BALDWIN THEATRE. ~~ ^~" 

(THE LEADING THEATRE.) 

Al. Hiyman Lessee and Manager 

For a limited engagement. The justly popular CARLETON OPERA COM- 
PANY, including Lily Post, Fanny Rice, Clara Wisdom, Rose Beaudet, 
Margaret Baxter, Emily Seymour, Charles H. Drew, Jay Taylor, Herman 
Ehreudt, J. K. Murray, Robert Broderick aud Mr. W. T. Carleton. To-night 
at 8. Every Evening (including Sunday). Saturday Matinee. The Great 
London Success, Alfred Cellier's Comedy Opera, 

DOEOTHYI 
With appropriate scenery, rich costumes, aud east to the full strength of 
the Carleton Opera Company. * 

Seats now on Sale. Regular Prices— Evening— 25, 50, 75, $1, $1.50; Matinee, 
25, 50, 75, $1. [Jan. 28. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Under the Management of Al. Havman and Lewis Morrison. 
The Talk of Sau Francisco! Thronged Houses! Amazed Audiencesj 
The Wonderful production! 

.A. ID^IEaiK: SIECIRIET. 
Great. Cast! Entire California Theatre Company! Beautiful Scenery! 
Startling Features! The Sensation of the Age! 

THE GREAT HENLEY REGATTA SCENE, 
For which 2,250 square feet of the Stage will be flooded with over five 
thousand cubic feet of Real Water, varying in depth from two to seven 
feet. Special engagement of Peterson, the great oarsman. Every Even- 
ing (including Sunday). Saturday Matinee. 
Prices— 25c, 35c, 50c, 75c. Secure your seats— avoid the crush. fjan. 2 8. 

BUSH-SfREET THEATR~E7~ 

M. B. Leavitt Proprietor [ Chas. P. Hall Manager 

Matinee this Afternoon at 2. Last Week Positively of WM. REDMUND 
and MRS. THOS. BARRY. Brilliant Success of their Emotional Drama, 

ZEIZEIROynilCsriiE: 
On, THE CROSS OF Gt)LD. 
A drama which deserves to rank with " A Celebrated Case," or "Rose 
Michel." — N. O. Picayune. 
A dramatic treat not often placed within reach.— N. O. Times. 
Hand-painted souvenirs will be given to ladies buying 75-cent tickets at 
Wednesdav Matinee. 

Next Week— Monday, January 30th, HAVERLY'S GREAT MINSTREL 
COMPANY. [Jan. 28. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE. 



Wallenrod, Osbourne & Stockwell, Managers— Geo. Wallenrod, Lessee 
This Evening and during week. Only Matinee Saturday. Over two 
thousand people witnessed the performance last night, aud acknowledged 
BAIRD'S MAMMOTH MINSTRELS absolutely the best Minstrel Company 
now before the public. An entertainment absolutely without a parallel on 
earth. Watch for the Street Parade daily at noon. 
Prices— 25c, 50c, 75c. Matinee Prices— 2oc, 50c. 
Next Monday, January 30th— Wallack's Great Success, 

SILVEB ZECIZEnTG- I f Jan. 28. 



Eclipse Extra Dry! 



Of most delicate flavor, and the 
only true Champagne produced in 
the United States. 



Jaa 28, L888. 



BAM PR WCISC0 HEWS LETTER. 



SPORTING. 



Two weeks ago I gave the tir-i report ol the oondlUon ol .'. B. 
Hugcta on the ranch In the Interior. Sinn- then 1 have 

roal many gentlemen a ha have spenl :t dn> or n at the ranch. They 
nil unite In pronouncing Mr. H;tLvtn > vmuiir*tera the fluent lot «.i 
horseflesh, collective!) . ever possessed i! one lima by any geutletnan 
in the United Btatea. Lately the racing « tables ware moved about 
three miles farther down the river, and preparations are beginning 
f-ir th< tern trip. Snapper (tttrrtson, the peei 

who is to ride for Haggin, will be on the cuust shortly, and u< 
gel Into the saddle for the races at the Spring Uood-noree me< 
The dates of this meeting are Saturday, April 21st, Tuesday the 24 tn, 
Thursday the 2b*1h, and Saturday the 2s th. Kvery prominent stable 
on the ooaat will !>«• represented, except |H>ssibly Lucky Baldwin's. 
Entries have been made by tin- stables o I llaggin, Ashe, Pritchard, 
Winters, Hearst, Chase. Thornton, Murray, Palo Alto, Shatter and 
Storn. This Insures fine racing programmes for every regular day 
and afl many extras ;i- the Association Bees tit to arrange. 

• • • • • 
Before the Blood-Horse Association decides where to bold the 

Bpring meeting, it would be well u< examine the claims of the two 
tracks the Bay District and the Oakland— both of which have been 
proposed as the place *>i meeting; Without question, the majority of 
sporting men would prefer to have the races take place on this side 
ol the bay, it a satisfactory and iron-clad agreement can be drawn up 
with William N. Hinchinan. They will not hesitate to engage the 
Oakland course, however, If any snide trotting races are go) up al the 
Bay District for the express purpose "t being bought off by the Blood- 
Horse nun, or it' Mr. mnchman wants t.. put the cost «'f new stables 
on the Association*, or it' un> of the other old-time dodge to common 
at the Bay District are attempted. A contingent of Oakland gentle- 
men would like, no donbt, to have the meeting held across the bay, 
bul the track is too far out of the way to be considered unless the Bay 
District crowd practices the time-worn games. As far as reputation 
for honesty and straightforwardness is concerned, neither track can 
boast. The jobbers and all-around scoundrels are just as strong on 
the Oakland course as at the Bay District— a fact satisfactory to the 
Insiders, no doubt, bul calculated l-> cinch the great outside. 1 favor 
the Bay District track because it is the most convenient of any that 
.an be selected) and because the hard hand of the Association "ought 
to be sufficient to exclude the tricksters during the meeting, exactly 
OS it kepi them in check last Fall at the Oakland course I mist that 
the negotiations will be conducted without any disagreeable hitches, 
and 1 am of the opinion that they will be. for Ilinchman made noth- 
ing last year by driving the Blood-Horse people away from him and 
getting up a little side show of his own. 

• * • • * 

Sporting matters have been remarkably dull this week. The in- 
clement weather seems to have ruined every form of athletics, and 
about the only sportsmen who ore completely happy are the duck 
hunters. They are having a rare season S sport, and' are improving 
their time, thinking that the magnificent shooting is too good to last 
long. The fishermen have been driven indoors, and a deathly still- 
ness prevails at all snorting headquarters. All the talk is confined 
to what is to come. We are having any amount of gossip about the 
Peterson-O'Connor race. Peterson made a master-stroke in the way 
of advertising in appearing at the California, and those who shout 
their throats into rags when he glides out on the stage are good for 
passage on the excursion steamers which will follow the oarsmen 
during the great race. Peterson is reported bv all the wiseacres to 
be in good trim, and he says himself that he will be in pet condition to 
give the Canadian a desperate battle. O'Connor has made many warm 
friends since his arrival a week ago. His method of training is nar- 
rowly watched by those who are amateur scullers, as well as by the 
host who wtfnt to turn a dollar or so on the race. O'Connor himself 
thinks he will cross the line the winner, but he does not underrate 
the California champion. He has heard much of Peterson's liability 
to lose his wits, and the Canadian's crafty scheme is to contrve to get 
his opponent worked up to a high pitch of excitement. Aside from 
this event little is talked about. We are going to have a billiard 
tournament, and also some wrestling in the Olympic Club rooms. 
There will also be some fighting in the California Club's arena, and a 
wrestling bout, on Tuesday, between Dean and Pritehard. We are 
to have more badger-baiting and other tabooed encounters, such as 
chicken fights, dog fights, etc. Everything is reserved for the future, 
however, and the present is suffering from general inanition. 

*■ * * * * 

The principal event of the week was the amateur boxing tourna- 
ment of last night at the Olympic club. As was to be expected the 
Olvmpians turned out in a mighty array, and they were entirely sat- 
isfied with what they saw. The best boxers in the club donned the 
mittens, and amused and instructed those who gathered around. 
The affair was entirely exclusive, which only added to the evening's 
enjoyment. The fight at the California Club last night between Car- 
roll and Larlen drew well, demonstrating that fistic affairs can be 
kept alive when nothing else will arouse enthusiasm. 

# * * * * 

The inclement weather of last week brought the St. Louis Browns, 
New York series of games to a sudden termination, leaving still un- 
determined the somewhat ancient controversy as to which of the 
clubs is the superior. It silenced, however, those wiseacres who 
sniffed hippodroming because each of the clubs won a game, and the 

third, they argued, was intended to draw the crowd. The refusal 

of Keefe and Ewing to work as a battery while here placed the Cali- 
fornia League managers in a disagreeable position before the public. 
It was no fault of the managers, however, as they paid Keete and 

Ewing for doing the work they failed to do. Levi Taylor is yet on 

the sick list. Father Time is dealing very unkindly with him. 

Stockton is trying to sign Wood, of the Phillies. The California 

League have entered into a contract with the Los Angeles Club to 
play a series of six games. The Pioneers, with Tom Brown in mid- 
dle field, Miller as pitcher, and Ned Williamson at short, play the Los 



Club thU afternoon Thetircenfa i snd Morans play the 

1 ' Ingelc to- rr-.» Itrown will catch foi the home club, 

Had tin- Browns snd Gianla played last Sunday* the game would 

have pleased no one, an the dia : 

would be liable to injure their limb The Sacramento i 

offered five Saturday and live Sunday gam< 

and not three games, a* slated by a paper ol that city. If 

men to does nut hasten, her more ambitious and cm i 

II leave her in the lurch Keefe, Ewing, lUi h 

who cameo*UI here as the big four, have returned home, 

•■ unwept, u ii honored and unsung." Ke« ft etaryand 

ol the si c\. , utivc officers ol the Brotherhood of Ball ['layers yel be 
railed t>. display any fraternal feeling here for the Interest ol bis rel- 
et that they did not make more money la largely 
due t" his selfishness in refusing to do his -hare of thework, although 

he was always on hand to receive In- diareol the games, Before 

c Eng Keete wrote a friend here, asking it the Callfornui League 

management could be relied upon to keep their contracts. It would 
have hen well tor the managers il thev had taken a bond thai Keefe 

WOUld keep his. That the public did not get the very best ball and 

plenty "t it since the local season closed was not the fault of the i all- 
League managers, They pud and lost money enOUgb to se- 
cure it. Guest, wno plays with the I. us Angeles Club, was here 

with the Chicagos in L8i9. This \a the season «>f the year when 

rumors Hy thick and fast about new grounds being started.- — Powers 
and Midler have Signed with the Utas for next season. 



MADAME LOUISE PYK 

Has the honor tn am nee a GKANH KVKNING CONCERT, undor the 

Immediate patronage of Mr.s. Hall McAllister, Mr-. Lloyd Tevls, Mrs. J. B. 

lla__in, Mis. .1. s. Ihi.-ar, Mrs. F. V. L..W. Mr-. Milieu (iriinth. Mr*. L, L. 
Maker, Mrs. m II. De Young, Mrs The reed Fair, Mr-. Win. II. Howard, Mrs. 
Horace Davis, Mr>. \V. l\ limul, Mrs. C. Wei. I. Howard. Mrs. Hy. Mel, n Mai 
tin, Madame C. De. Qulgae, Mrs. Louis B. I'armtt. Mrs. James Knl.ins.iu, 

Mrs, John Parrott, Mrs Jos. D. Grant, Mr-. Carlton Coleman, Baroness Von 
Behroeder, Mrs. c. \v. Crocker, Miss Flood, ami many others— to take place 
nt B'NAI B'KITII HALL, on MONDAY EVBNING. January 80, 1888, kindly 
assisted by MISS AUCE m. BACON, Pianist, and the HERMANN BRANDT 
QrjARTElTE. 

Tickets (including reserved seat) One Dollar: Boxes (5 seats) Five Dollars. 
May be obtained on application by letter to Madame Louise Pyk, 1510 Sac- 
ramento street, or at Messrs. Sherman A Clay's Musie Store, on Snliirduv, 
ihe'JMli, ami Monday, the MOth in-t., from 'J a. M, till b v. M. [Jan. 28, 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Sole Proprietors and Manage™ 

Until further notice. First time on this Coast, Hillocker'a Latest and 
Beht Operetta, 

TIHIIE VILLAGE COQUETTE. 
Full of Musical Gems and Amusing Situational A Marked Success every" 
where! New Scenery! New Costumes! New Properties! New Every- 
thing! A Magnificent Firemen's Parade, headed by a Splendid Military 
Band. Grand Orchestra and Chorus. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25 and M Cents. [Jan. 28, 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE BASEBALL GROUNDS, 

End of Haight-street Cable Road. 
SATUBDAY, Jan. 28th, at 2:30 o'clock p. m.. PIONEERS vs. LOS ANGELES 

SUNDAY, Jan. 29th. 11 o'clock A. M KEANES vs. BAY CITY8 

At2o'clock P. M LOS ANGELES vs. GREENHOOD & MOKANS 

Admission, 25 and 10 cents. Ladies free on Saturday. Reserved seats on 
Sundays, 25 cents extra. 

Scats can he secured at Gunst's Cigar Store, junction Marketaud O'Farrell 
streets, until 10 o'clock on day of game. [Jan. 28. 

THE MONSTER PANORAMA 

Of the Famous Land and Naval 

BATTLES O^ ^7"IC:E£SBTTXS,a- ! 
Open daily from 9 A. M. to 11 P. M., corner Mason and Eddy streeta. 
«f- Balloons for the Children Every Saturday. [Jan. 21. 



GRAND PANORAMA 



Superb Battle Pictures Amidst Magnificent Scenery. Storming of 
AflHMiouary Ritlge. Lookout Mountalu. flmi ta hooka. 

Open 9 a. m. to 11 P. M., daily (including Sundays), cor. Market and Tenth 
Admission, 50c. Children half price. [Jau. 21. 

Piano-Forte Card. 

MR. HENRY MARSH receives Pupils at bis MUSIC STUDIO, 103 
O'Farrell Street, and at his private residence, 2307 Jones Street. 

Agent for Robert Fay's Unrivaled Pianos. CASH OR INSTALLMENTS. 



MRS. DARLING, DRESSMAKER, 

Having lately secured the services of a well-known French draper, in 
conjunction with the best of cutlers and filters, is prepared to make 
Street, Evening or Stage Dresses, at short notice. 

No. 37 FIFTH ST., San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 7. 



MME. WALDO-COHEN, 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 
7275 CLAY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



MRS, ADA CLARK'S DANCING ACADEMY, 

211 Sutter Street *°ove Kearnj 

PRIVATE LESSONS AND PRIVATE GLASSES A SPECIALTY. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



MAG AT THE HOWARD FANCY BALL. 

Dear N. L.: Now 't all the dailies from the " Monarch " down to 
the serfs, 's been gushin' inside out over the Fancy Dress German, 
it's about time for little Slag to have a show, ain't it? Anyhow, you 
know I promised to give you a full account o' the ball from a inside 
view — none o' your reporter racket — but 's one o' the participants, 
'n you bet your boots 't there's a big difference in a inside 'n a out- 
side version of anytnin', 's the many friends o' yourself 'n Mag tes- 
tify. Well, then, to begin: When the eventful evenin' arrived it 
looked like it was goin' to rain, 'n so there was no end of shelter ar- 
ranged outside so's to cover up folks gettin' out o' their carriages. 
Once you got inside the door, my! warn't it just lovely. lender 
your feet everything was white like snow, 'n over your head 'n each 
side greens like you was in a shrubbery, even the ceilings was all cov- 
ered with ferns, 'n in the hall, right in the middle, was a mask over a 
big silver ball a hangin' down. The ceilin's o' the drawin' room was 
all fixed up with blue tulle to look like the sky, 'n the loolcin' glass 
was covered with draperies 'n butterflies, thereby givin' the old Judge 
a chance to remark 't " butterflies usually hovered round looking 
glasses." Every one was wonderin' what on top o' this earth made 
Marye 'n Winnie 'n other.-, o' that ilk, keep away from the fro, t 
parlor like they was scared to go in, till all of a sudden it struck Ned, 
'n he pointed out the spider's web o' silk cords 't was arranged there. 
(It warn't no use for flies o' fashion to tempt the old boys o' the 
spider species; no " come into my parlor" tor tbem). The Judge 
said 't Minerva had frightened the owls in the back room, 'cause 
there was several apparently just takin' flightto a corner o'the room. 
The lookin' glass in this room had a hawk hidden away in the foli- 
age surroundin' it, ready to pounce on some dove. But, my gra- 
cious, I couldn't begin to tell you all the decorations; it appeared 
like the notion was to make it all look like a garden or orange groves. 
Just imagine bunches o' oranges hangin' round — you bet lots o' folks 
sampled 'em, too, 'n what do you s'pose, I saw some people pock- 
etin the Jap'nese dolls 't was swingin' in the dinin' room fixin's! 
Ned said 't what took his fancy was the "devil's" head over the punch- 
bowl, 'n sayin' 't he ruled the feast. My ! what a lot o' time 'n money 
it must a took to fix up that house. 

Well, to return to the party. Folks was pretty late in comin', 'n it 
was most eleven o'clock when the band was told to strike up for the 
first o' the character dances, of which there was four. The dancers 
was all real well up in them, 'cause they'd been practicnV with a 
dancin' master for some of 'em, 'n my I such awful pretty shoes 's 
most of 'em had on. I was just wild to know who made 'em — the 
shoes, not thedancers — 'u never rested till I found out 'twas McNulty. 
One thing was very noticeable, the folks 't had nice feet wore short 
dresses, 'n vice versa— you bet. Nellie Smedburg took the cake in 
the pastoral quadrille. She was the cutest little shepherdess 't ever 
you saw. They say 't the army chap 't danced with the other Nellie 
is dead gone, 's Ned said " another county heard from." There's one 
thing sure, 'n that is, 't shepherd's costoom is more tryin' (especially 
about the— ahem, continuations) than uniform of the l T . S. A*. 
Every one was delighted with the pretty dance, 'n went round tellin' 
how cute they looked, 'n so forth. That charmin' matron had the 
two Eds. in her dance, 'n you just oughter a seen Sheldon ! in a gor- 
geous white 'n gold coat 'n corn-colored breeches. Ed. Greenaway 
was in pink and black ('n the knee-breeches disclosed why he rolls so 
in walkin', only don't give me away). The ladies o' this dance all 
chose diffrent colors 'n was o' the Directoire period — accordin' to his- 
tory the I)i reel 'oirc was drawn from ancients— but three at least o' the 
male portion o' this crowd evidently went to the other extreme. 
Mott was resplendent in blue 'n white, 'n Harry Tevis had a lovely 
shade o' green 'n pink. It 'd be next to impossible to describe all the 
costooms, but a few 't ain't been particularly noticed by any one, de- 
serves special mention on account o' the exact fitness o' the character 
chosen by the wearer, like Henry Redington hangin' out the sign o' 
the spoon, 'n Bourne 's a rat-catcher, 'n Winnie 's Paul Pry. I just 
leave it to any girl goin' if he ain't always intrudin' at the Very mo- 
ment vou're havin' a cosy time with your favorite fellah!" The 
quadrille o' " sports " had some real funny personators. Fancy the 
staid awfully proper sister showin' up *s a " sport." Who'd a thought 
it? The army chaps 't stuck to the buttons was blessed by havin' 
eight o' the muses for their companions 'n the minuet. Ned said 't 
the conundrum o' the evenin' was which o' the nine was absent. 

I reckon you'd like to know which was which 'n what they wore, 
'cause their dresses was 's like 's two p^as, except in color, 'n Dora 
had the prettiest color of 'em all. She was Euterpe, o' course— the 
muse o' music. No one was surprised to find Betty 's Polyphymnia 
(rhetoric), while her merry sister took Thalia, 'n vou bet the oldest 
Corbctt girl made the chaps see stars 's Urania. Ned said it made a 
fellah brush up his knowledge to keep track o' the characters; but, la 
me! all us girls has been goin' through our old school books like mad, 
for all the world like we was gettin' up for a examination, ever since 
the cards come out. 

I don't believe the muses had a very inspirin' effect upon their 
partners, to judge from the efforts o' the men to get under other in- 
fluences. The host 'n hostess looked real elegant in their costooms, 
though Mrs. Howard is too good-natured-lookin' to make a real state- 
ly Queen Elizabeth. Mr. Howard appeared like he was ready 'n will- 
in' to throw his fine cloak down for any woman to step on. One 
pretty girl looked exactly like her name, just like a pearl. But la me! 
if you could a seen a right "far on" matron got up 's a rosebud (some 
one suggested 't the thorn warn't in sight, though a sure thing). An- 
other chose— now what do you s'pose?— poor Marie Stuart; 'n as Ned 
said of all opposite extremes, the ill-fated Queen was so feminine- 
lookin' 'n lovely, 'n the wearer o' the dress just the other thing. 
Madam Mac looked gorgeous as a Marquise— you bet she knows too 
much to make a guy o' herself in ridiculous attire — 'n her costoom 
was real becomin 1 . An ancient maid was covered with moss 'n old 
twigs (no allusion to J. W. intended). You just oughter a seen the 
Dutch Baron carryin' round his own trumpet! Karl forgot the 
hatchet in his get-up, but I reckon he felt there is a limit to every- 
thing, 'n had to draw the line somewhere— why not veracity? Joe 
Redding didn't carry out the favorite motto o'old man Tallyrand, 
for, you bet, silence warn't golden in his racket. The very idea* of the 



recently announced fiancee goin' as the melancholy Jacques! Warn't 
it a comical notion ? Marie Antoinette looked too sweet for any thin'. 
Miss Peyton was the wearer o' the costoom, so you can imagine how 
nice she looked. You should a seen Dinsmore tryin' to get one o' the 
shepherdesses to confess her sins to him, 'cause he was a monk. She 
told him it 'd take all evenin', so he quit 'n took a mermaid in hand. 
There was Spanish peasants 'n Spanish grandees (Marye gloomy 'n 
grand 's the latter), 'n Follys 'n Punches 'n vaqueros, n Ward Mc- 
Allister 's a rival to Buffalo Bill, some one said, but I reckon he was 
a Alaska Indian. 

But my gracious! every one was just crazy for the german to be- 
gin, 'n half of 'em rushed through their supper to get down for fear 
o' missin' it — such a magnificent supper, too. You bet 't Mag did 
full justice to it, 'n at our little table we had the gayest crowd out. 
But to the cotillion. When the cards first came out every one was 
busy wonderin' who'd be chosen to lead, 'n they did say 't the Pre- 
sidio was in a ferment every time the telephone rung, each off ter ex- 
pectin' a call, while the two Ed. 's had wakin' dreams o' new figgers 
'n devices; butlo, 'n behold! Boston had the honor o' directin' the 
dance, 'n Mr. Hammond, dressed up 's Figaro, performed 's leader 
to general satisfaction. The figgers weren't nothing extraordinary 
even if they did have a Bawston leader. The one 't he originated 
hisself was bags containin 1 decks o' playin' cards placed on easels so 
's to be esthetic, o' course, then whoever was " in " drew a card, the 
men from one bag, the wimmen from the other, 'n then all hands 
was told to match for partners. I heard one old rippin' tearin' poker 
player sayin' 't he'd go several better to capture one fellah's girl, 'n I 
reckon she'd as lieve a changed partners too, for the old boy's no end 
of a dancer, Ned says. The favors was all ranged on a table in the 
hall, 'n distributed by two ladies 't didn't care to dance (Ned was 
wonderin' if the self-denial o' one of 'em 'd reach the cattle ranch). 
Just as I told you, the Leghorn hats 'n ostrich tips made the girls re- 
joice, while the little straw tall hats o' cigarettes 'n pearl scarf pins had 
the same effect on the men. I reckon 't the motto, " Paddle your 
own canoe " on the paddles for the men struck home to one or two 
at least, for they looked kind o' down hearted for a few minutes. I 
heard Froelich say to a shepherde;^ 't he hoped he'd be found in- 
scribed in her heart-shaped tablet, 'n you should a seen her simper 
'n say 't he'd made his mark there already ! Mott was makin' pretty 
good runnin', but somehow the button chaps never appear like they 
was regularly goin' in for it heart and soul, 'less it's one o' the heir- 
esses, 'n though lots o' girls whose pas 's well fixed was present, no 
bonanza was in sight. When I was describing the characters as- 
sumed for the occasion the Judge kept makin' riddles the whole time 't 
no one on top o' this earth but his own self could guess, like askin' why 
one o' the ladies filled the bill for his favorite Cleopatra. 'Cause age 
didn't wither her, 'n so forth. 

But, la me, it was such a sight, just for all the world like a kaleide- 
syope, changing every minnit to new colors 'n groups, 'n I don't be- 
lieve 't such another 'U be seen in this town in a hurry, 'cause the 
folks 't have the same coin are too killin' mean to lay it out; even if 
the Bachelors' german brings out the dresses, the decorations 'n so 
forth won't be on hand. Joe said that the Art Masquerade Ball was 
a goin' to take the cake. I reckon it'll be daisy fun, 'cause don't vou 
see folks '11 be masked, 'n what things can be said 'n done inside a 
mask, eh? Some one suggested 't it 'd be immense if the different 
newspapers was each represented, but gracious me! just fancy them 
two lightnin' presses encounterin' each other in the room ! ! ! 

Well, 1 reckon I've given you about all the items o' the german, 
ain't I? 'n now there ain't no room for nothin' else, 'n I've got heaps 
to tell you, too. But never mind, I'll make up for it next time, n 
now, ta ta. Mag . 



Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 



GRAND ViN d'AY 




GOLD LACK SEC! 

In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 



Jan. 21.] 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 



HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 




FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



Under Grand Hotel. 



[Dec. 17. 



Jan. 88, 1888. 



-AN FRANCIS* o NEWS LETTER 



11 



THE LAST NIGHT OF THE YEAR. 
Without, the belli %n throbbing thru' Uie rain— 
omfort men ;ii *<-.i hi such n ilonu); 
Within, the generous-hearted ticartll i* wann, 
And ourtalna mash the wind- tormented pane. 

Those pealing belU ! how strangely they t* 

Autumn and Summer ami m\ lift 'a dear May. 
The future; Winter's snnw-.'lrifui Lie thai way, 

And not a gleam >>\ sunshine thro' it all. 

'* on pity me with ball averted eye 

■ eyes! so I ik*- tin- bine uf star and flame, 
Bo like to '.■ I sometimes think the same 
An* smiling on me oat ol Paradise. 

An old man's fancy f Draw the footstool nigh, 
And I will ■-how von pictures in the tin.-. 
Mark you the village church, its yellow spire 

A line oi hghl against the April akyt 

And, oh. the hells! the hells of memory!— 
Again I seem to feel her light < 
while to the hills they ring her happy "yes"— 

The hills that tell the story to the sea I 

In theqnainl churchyard now thnl blithesome Spring 
Make- green the quiel corners of the land, 
Beneath the bowery elm tree hand in hand 

We pause, to hear the early throstle sing. 

And then the picture changes. Nature weaves 
A closer web- her paths are decpererown. 
Prom the Low branches broader -hade is thrown, 

And the bine sky ol June melts thro' the leaves. 

Again we tread the old grass-covered way, — 
Again the churchbells echo far and wide; 
With whitest blessings crow ned my lily bride, 
- in the sun upon our wedding day. 

And now November wraps thr earth in goom, 

And cold winds Whistle thro' the rhurehyard gray. 
I cannot weep; I have no words to pray, 

AHho' the twilight folds about her tomb. 

And -till they ring the weary, weary belli 

"0 I 'eath ! ' ' Love ! deathless love and vain ! " 
And -till my heart repeats the mournful strain, 
Ami ever still the Autumn tempest swells! 

" So -ad." you Bay ? Nay. grieve not, pretty one; 
No touch ol hoary Winter pales the rose, 
That she should tremble when the skies disclose 
Hints of December and a shrouded sun,— 
The dying embers fade. The tale is done. 
Son Fran ixco, January 28, 1888. Martha T. Tyler. 

SOME GREAT EVENTS. 
Just at this moment there is some hubble-bubble amongst French 
politicians in Prance, and higele-diggle amongst American politicians 
is America, and babble-gabble amongst English politicians in Eng- 
land, ami the press makes chronicle of it, and we conceit within our- 
selves that we know somewhat of what is really ** going on " in the 
world. Powe? A glance backward may help answer the question. 
What happened in, say, 18647 Why, in 1854 Longfellow published 
the ■• Song of Hiawatha." As to who was Speaker of the House then, 
who cares now? There are many memorable years: the year when 
Howe's sewing-machine needle. Hell's telephone, or the type-writer 
were severally invented were memorable; the years when " Uncle 
Tom's Cabin," " Origin of Species," and " Notre Dame de Paris" ap- 
peared were memorable ; the year Dickens died, the years Helmholz 
and Niebuhr were born are memorable. What is the Czar Nicholas 
now but the shadow of a shade? or the last three Popes? or the last 
three constables of Milpitas? The election of those constables shook 
Milpitas to its center, and of those Popes thrilled all Christendom. 
Yet when each of these stupendous events convulsed nature with 
throes as of parturition, some quiet soul somewhere was thinking 
something and thinking out something that is shaping the course of 
the human race. What matter who was President of the French Re- 
public last week, or shall be so next? What matter what becomes of 
a Republic that gives us neither a Beranger nor a Murger, nor even a 
Hugo? If nothing were doing in England but what new-papers tell 
about, small difference would it make what became oi England 
either. If nothing but what they tell were doing in America, a 
shower of fire from Heaven would prove the reality of a Cod of 
wrath. From what newspapers do you gather the most memorable 
event of 1856? Consult our title-page. In that year the News Letter 
was founded. 

Since we commenced the publication of the 'series of artotypes 
known as "Artistic Homes of California," there has been a continu- 
ous inquiry for back numbers. Having reprinted those of which the 
edition was exhausted, we are now in a position to supply all 
who wish to have a complete file of these pictures. Neat and attract- 
ive portfolios, made expressly for preserving the artotypes, are for 
sale at the business office, Fourth and Market- streets Building, for 
fifty cents each. 

" Oh, my darling, your voice is as musical to me as a vesper bell, 
whose tones fall softly on the perfumed evening air. Speak again, 
and say those words, mv beloved, for I could listen to your voice until 
the stars are extinguished in everlasting night." Six months after 
marriage: " I have just about enough of your clapper, old woman, 
and if you don't shut up I'll leave the house." 

G. T. Marsh & Co., 625 Market street, receive fresh consignments of 
Japanese Goods every steamer. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Compinv. 

pal place of bu ■ i Prmaolieo, Callfornli 

tlonol wi Cou uly, Nevada, 

Not lee || hereby given that at a meethiR nl the H«.«r.l ..f Director*, held "ii 

■1'iy ol Jn iry, IBftK, mi n 

per share wn» levied upon the i <>f the corporation, payable 

Immediately, In United Slate* k -..].| coin, to the Secretary, H the oil 

'. Ne\ iidti hin-k, Ni. ti Fran- 

California 
Any itoek upon which this uaoasmeni ihall remain unpaid on the 
Twenty-first f2Ht) day ol February. 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised fur sale tit put. lie auction and unless payment ll made be- 

rore, will be sold on Tl'EStiAY, the Thin* day ol March, I 

pay the delinquent a- •.■-mm.' lit, t«.i; ether Uitll COatl Ol a. I V.Ttl | i Qg mel <■ \ 

i esof sale. By order ol i he Board '•( Directors. 

< ii \s k. BLUOT, Secretary. 

■■hi 79 Nevada Block, No, :ti rj direct, Han Fran 

el i ■ California. [Jan. sl 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location ol principal pla I hardness-San Francisco, California. Looa* 

tion of works— Tuticaroru Mining Dh.tr let, Elko County Nevada 
Notice i hereby kI ven that at a meeting ol the Board ol Directors, held 

mil the twenty -ninth i29) day ol December, 1887, an assessment (N 

Fifty (50c.) Cents per share won levied ii| the capital stock of th ir> 

■I, payable immediately In Pnltcd States gold coin, to the Secretary, 

at tbe office oi the company, u. 52, Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery 

street. San t'rauei-co, California, 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Monday, the sixth (6) day of February. 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment it* made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the twenty-eighth (28) day of February, 
1888, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costo ol advertfe 
iug nml expenses of sale. By order of the Board ol Directors. 

HENRY DEA8, Secretary. 
oniei — Room 52, Nevada Hiuck, No. sou Montgomery street, Ban Francisco, 
California [Dec. 81. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Navajo Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Fraurisen, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Tenth day of January, 1888, >ui assessment (No. 18) of Thirty 
Cents (80c.) per tdiare was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the ottice of the company, 310 Pine street, Rooms 16 and IT, San FranCuBCO, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
Fourteenth Day of February. 1888, will be delinquent. 
And advertised for sale at public auetion ; and unless payment is mail e be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 6th day of March. 1888, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

OFFICE— No. :siO Pine street, Rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 14. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of Works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the Fourth day of January, 188s, an assessment (No. 48) of Fifty Cente 
(50c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the oillce ol the 
Company, Room 3, No. 329 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 8th day of February, 1888, will be delinquent, 
And advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the Twenty-ninth day of February, 18S8, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs oi advertising aud 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

P JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 3, Stock Exchange Building, No. 329 Pine street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. [Jan. 7. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best Belcher Mining Company. 

Assessment i .No. 39 

Amount pur Share ; 60 Cents 

L ev i e {j January 4th, 1888 

Delinquent iu Ollice February Jtb, 1888 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 2d, 1888 

L. OSHOKN, Secretary. 
OFFICE- Room 29, Nevada Block, :109 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
(.'nlif..rnia. I-'" 11 - '■ 

English Milkweed Face Powder, 

White, Flesh, Pink and Cream Tints. 

The only harmless beautifler. Used exclusively in the Courts of Europe. 
EDWIN W. JOY, 
Nov. 12.] 852 Market Street, Sole Agent. 



I GEO, H. PALMER 



Has Removed His Oflicc to 427 Sutter Street, near corner of Powell. 
Hours 1 to 3 P. M. Residence, N. E. corner of Jackson aud Fillmore Streets. 
Telephone 4,189. 



fJau. 21. 



Eclipse Extra Dry 



roduct of the Finest 
Grapes of the World. 



A natural 
Jra 
( Brandy. 



No addition of 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



THE FUTURE OF CHINATOWN. 

"What is to be done with Chinatown? The time has about ar- 
rived when the progress of a large section of the city depends upon 
the answer that may be given to that question. The property owners 
at North Beach, along the Pacific Hights, and throughout a large 
portion of the Western Addition are seriously interested in it. In a 
less, but yet highly important, degree the whole city is concerned. 
Chinatown not only blights the large, central and important area 
which it occupies, but its baleful influence extends far and near. As 
an unsightly, low, filthy and pestilence-breeding nuisance, it is a 
noisome ulcer upon the whole city, that ought never to have been 
permitted to assume its present proportions, and that must be re- 
moved ere its gangrenous growth destroys a still larger area within 
the very heart of this beautiful Queen City of the Pacific, of which we 
are all accustomed to talk so enthusiastically. Chinatown cannot re- 
main where it is, and what it is, and San Francisco become a city to 
be proud of. It is high time, then, that a general concensus of opin- 
ion were reached as to how its removal is to be effected. Everybody 
is agreed, we take it, that it ought to go, and that it must be made to 
go sooner or later, and the onlv question is as to how its going may 
be ordered with certainty and dispatch. It is no new thing for power 
to be found for the condemnation of objectionable quarters of large 
cities. The process is going on in London pretty nearly all the time. 
Old rookeries have to give way to the demands of modern progress. 
Occasionally we hear of buildings, cherished for the historical mem- 
ories that attach to them, having to succumb to the spirit of improve- 
ment. During the last fifteen years large portions of the great Eng- 
lish metropolis have been so changed that it is no longer the London 
of even such recent writers as Dickens and Thackeray. In like man- 
ner, Napoleon III. tore down the old in order to build up a new 
Paris, that is at once the pride of France and the envy of the world. 
Even here in San Francisco the process of condemnation is by no 
means rare. We have used it rather lavishly, considering that our 
city is hardly a generation old. Kearny street is the splendid boule- 
vard it is because of the exercise by the Legislature of the power to 
condemn lands and buildings to the end that the greater good of the 
greater number might be promoted. At this very moment the propo- 
sition to widen the western end of Mission street meets with favor, 
and the improvement is pretty sure to be made. The power of the 
municipal authorities to condemn Chinatown and cause it to be razed 
to the ground is not in doubt. Like authority has frequently been 
exercised here and elsewhere, and with advantage to the whole peo- 
ple. If the area covered by the Chinese quarters were condemned 
and the shanties carted away, we believe the reclaimed land, cut up 
into suitable lots and sold under conditions as to the nature and 
quality of the buildings to be permitted to be erected upon them, 
would pay any assessed value which the present owners could reason- 
ably claim. If that be true— and real estate experts believe it would 
prove to be so — it is apparent that Chinatown can be got rid of and a 
most desirable substitution effected without one dollar's expense to 
the taxpayers at large. It is, of course, not within the scope of a 
short article like this to anticipate and answer all objections as to 
details. We are very sure that a scheme can be devised by which 
this great improvement can be effected without actual loss to any- 
body. If that were not possible, it would still be within the compe- 
tency of the municipality, in its corporate and governing capacity, 
to condemn Chinatown as a nuisance, and prevent its occupation un- 
til re-built in a defined and substantial manner. That might seem 
hard upon the property owners, but in the end the enforced improve- 
ment would prove to be no less to their personal advantage than to 
the good of the whole city. The best interests of San Francisco de- 
clare that Chinatown must go I 

A L.OCAL CANONIZATION. 

The ecclesiastical authorities of Rome are considering a Phila- 
delphia case which has almost its exact counterpart in San Francisco. 
The late Right Reverend John Nepomucene Neumann, formerly 
Bishop of Philadelphia, is now in the hands of his friends as a can- 
didate for saintship. It seems that thirty days after the prelate's 
death his tomb was opened and the " body was found to be perfectly 
incorrupt." Thereafter the tomb became the shrine of devout Cath- 
olics, " many of whom ascribed to the dead prelate's intercession 
remarkable cures of both mental and bodily ailments." For in- 
stance, Elizabeth Driscoll lost the use of her voice, but while kneeling 
at the grave of the dead Bishop "she articulated his name, and 
from that time her power of speech was*wholly regained." Another 
girl became almost blind, but after nine days devotion at the tomb of 
the holy prelate she regained her sight. * The friends of the future 
saint also assert that he possessed the gift of prophecy. 

It is impossible to overlook the striking coincidences between the 
career of the holy Philadelphian and that of the late Nobby Clarke. 
During all the time that has elapsed since his official death, this 
righteous man's body has remained "perfectly incorrupt," all the 
corruption being concentrated in his character. Some time ago, Offi- 
cer John Morgan lost the use of his voice. Repeated efforts could 
extract no articulate response from him except " Lemme(hic) 'lone," 
but after kneeling at the tomb of the holy servant of God with a 
small praise-offering, the artiicted man's speech was so far restored 
that the Police Commissioners could discern no defect in it. About 
the same time Officers Mahony and Carroll suffered from such a seri- 
ous impairment of the sight that while on dutv they wandered into 
a saloon, not recognizing the character of the place. Through the 
intercession of the spirit of the beatified Nobby, the mercy of the 
blessed Trinity, Hammond the Father, Alvord the Son and Tobin the 
Holy Ghost, descended upon and healed the unfortunate policemen, 
and their sight is now so far restored that thev can tell an " outside" 
lottery shop from a licensed one at a hundred' yards. That the dead 
Clerk of the Commissioners also possessed the gift of prophecy is in- 
dicated by the fulfillment of his prediction that his connection with 
the Police Department would not cease with his decapitation. It is 
understood that these and many similar examples of divine favor 
have led to an active movement for the canonization of Mr. Clarke 
under the title of St. Nobby Thaumaturgos. 



HAGER SUCCUMBS. 
When Hager first took office as Collector of the Port he agreed 
with his friend, Colonel Stuart M. Taylor, as to the iniquity of Boss 
Buckley and all his ways, and determined that he would ignore Bush 
street as completely as if it did not exist as the ruling motive power 
of the Democratic party in this city. Since then a strange and won- 
drous change has come over the spirit of the Collector's dream. He 
has succumbed and the Boss is on top. The blind white rooster 
struts up and down Bush street, flaps his wings, and crows over his 
victory. He boasts to his lambs as he with cause boasted in regard 
to the police, " I've downed 'em, boys." It is a sorry sight — Hager 
in the gutter and Buckley crowing over him. And now the heads 
are falling around the Customs House like the leaves in Autumn. 
The following circular letter with all its tautological and other de- 
fects upon its head is doing its work : "Sir — Your resignation, if ten- 
dered by the instant, will be accepted. If not tendered, a 

name will be sent to Washington for confirmation to fill your posi- 
tion. [Signed") Hager, Collector." A score or more of removals, 
seven being union soldiers, have just taken place, and in every in- 
stance the vacancy has been filled by a Buckley lamb. The miserable 
excuse is offered that Governor Waterman is making changes from 
party considerations. But Governor Waterman ought not to be a 
guide to anybody; besides, he is not bound by any civil service law, 
nor by any declared policy of the President of the United States, whilst 
Collector Hager is. It is fortunate for him that George William < ur- 
tis and the Civil Service Reform Association do not have their being 
on the Pacific Coast. He would not be Collector of the Port another 
month if they had. And now the Boss opens the door of his fold and 
Hager meekly enters. The local Tammany Society, at its last meet- 
ing, acting upon instructions from Buckley, elected the Collector a 
life member, and Hager writes his " thanks for the handsome man- 
ner in which this honor has been conferred upon me." The kid- 
gloved hand grasps the slime of the gutter, the pretentious Collector 
of $100,000,000 a year of Uncle Sam's revenue, places himself under 
the protecting wing of the boss criminal who collects personal largess 
from gamblers, thieves and prostitutes, and Buckley introduces his 
latest conquest into the fold of his lambs, and all this in the name 
of civil service reform, and in the name of a President who means 
what he says. Bah ! Hager is looking out for himself and the future. 



FRIENDS 
Gambling is licensed 



OF THE POLICE. 



San Francisco, and pays a higher 
license fee than in any other city in the Union. That is a broad 
and sweeping statement that may sound strange to many peo- 
ple, but it is true nevertheless. The only tbing is that the license is 
not issued according to law, and the fee does not go into the public 
treasury. The law prohibits gambling and imposes heavy penalties 
upon those found engaged in it. The trouble is that the present 
perpetual Police Department grants immunity to all gamblers who 
secretly pay it the price which it extorts through its confidential 
agents. Thus it is perfectly true to say that gambling is virtually 
licensed in San Francisco, and that it pays an exorbitant license 
fee. The gambling is conducted in various ways. In Piatt's 
Hall it is pools on horse-racing and chances in " the clock game " 
of stocks, which latter is simply faro in a more risky form than is 
played at the ordinary gambling houses. Piatt's flail could be and 
would be suppressed if it did not pay to the Boss, who divides with the 
Police, fifteen per cent, of its gross" earnings. The Grand Jury is in 
session ; will it venture to go to the bottom of the schemes now running 
in Piatt's Hall, and learn how it comes that such open, barefaced 
gambling is run contrary to law? The Grand Jury can find out, if 
it wants to, that the Police have an agent who collects a license fee 
every month for permitting certain things to be conducted in Piatt's 
Hall. Will the Grand Jury do its duty in the premises? We think 
not. If there are twelve men on the jury who dare indict certain 
Police officials for anything, no matter what the testimony or what 
the crime, we confess we do not know who they are. The pool- 
rooms, the stock " clocks," the faro dealers, the tan players, the Chi- 
nese lottery gamesters, and all and sundry the gamblers of this in- 
sanely gambling city, pay in order that thev may play, and the 
result is a corruption fund that keeps the Police in office and gives 
the Boss control of the criminal elements by whose aid he runs the 
primaries and captures the entire city government, and that is the 
whole political and municipal situation in a nutshell. 



STRIKES AND STRIKERS. 
Last week the stupid insolence of the striking cooks and waiters 
exasperated us. This week the men move us to pity. Their failure 
has been so abject, their idiocy has been so summarily and relentlessly 
punished that we find no room left for resentment. This strike has 
falsified one proverb. It has been supposed that Providence cared 
for fools and Americans. Few of the cooks, waiters and bakers are 
Americans, but all could claim divine protection on the other statu- 
tory ground, ami their failure to get it must have shaken their faith 
in revealed truth. The Unions appear to manage their affairs on pre- 
cisely the opposite principle from that adopted in all combinations of 
ordinary human beings. The Union rule is, that anybody can start 
a revolution, but that unanimous consent is necessary to maintain 
peace. A single assembly of bakers may strike, without asking the 
advice or consent, or considering the interests, of any other persons 
on earth, and when they have brought themselves into trouble, the 
cooks and waiters, the butchers, the brewers, the pattern-makers, the 
iron-molders, the printers and the coast seamen, with no grievance of 
their own and no voice in the original declaration of war, are expected 
to join in the fight, and deprive themselves of work, if necessary, 
until the last baker has brought the last reluctant employer to terms. 
A workman's opportunity to earn a living depends not only upon the 
maintenance of good relations between himself and his employer, 
not only upon the preservation of harmony and common sense 
throughout his own trade union, but upon the discretion of every 
feather-headed malcontent in every union in every line of industry. 
Under such a system a workingman becomes a nomad, with a place 
more precarious than the tenure of a Federal officeholder. 



Jan. 28; 188S. 



s.\\ PB IN0I8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



TOWN CRIER. 



"H«r the Crier!" "What Hi.- devil art thou.'" 
"Om that will play the devil, Mr. with you." 



The killing of Mr. Peterson, the dime novel highwayman, b; 
DuJT, is one "i the most creditable feats thai has gone to the credit of 
the police department for some years. The highwaymen ol the 
Claude Dnval period, who, mounted on a fierv Obarger, rattled over 
the lonely heath and bade the corpulent ol the wealthy 

noble to stand and deliver, waa a romantic norl of a fellow, who com- 
manded a large amount ol sympathy. But this vulgar wretch, with 
big painted mustache and blue jeans an<l slouched bat, belonged to a 
certain vermin which should be stamped out, crashed, slaughtered, 
exterminated bv every man who is not afraid to encounter those in- 
tolerable scoundrels. I remembers case where a gentleman, who is 
now employed upon the history of the Pacific States, and who is 
about as improvident as a careless man can be, met a footpad one 
night and waa by him commanded to throw up his hands. This the 
historian did promptly, but brought them down again with such 
violence on the robber's head th.it he felled him to the ground. He 
did not then call for the police, or himself attempt to take the ruffian 
Into custody; he -imply examined the prostrate man's pockets with 
quiet and self-possessed scrutiny. The footpad panned out four 
dollars and sixty cents in coin, a pocket-knife, pistol and a commuta- 
tion ticket for toe Oakland ferry. Tho historian was quite satisfied 
with the incident, and strolled leisurely home, praying for the ap- 
pearance of another highwayman. 

When the Angelus bell is ringing, 

Ind the shadows are creeping down, 
A f.ir-otv echo i> bringing, 

Distinct 'mid the hum of the town, 
A silvery voice, which sayeth, 

•• friend, when the Angelus tolls, 
And the pious, on bent knees, prayetb 

For the peace of translated souls. 
" Tor thee my voice will ho given, 

My pravors for thee will ascend 
To the loftiest vaults of heaven, 

Beloved and cherished friend." 
When the Angelas bell is ringing, 

From belfries high in the air. 
<>n swift pinions my soul is winging 

Its way to that friend in prayer. 
"Mid all life's tribulations, 

'Mid its worry and crosses and pain. 
Comes this reigning consolation, 

This sense of immortal gain, 
That whether my burden be shifted 

Or no, there is one who prays, 
Whose gentle voice is uplifted 

For my welfare in thorny ways. 

A newspaper wag has lately been amusing himself at the ex- 
pense of our esteemed and worthy relative and protector. Uncle 
Bam. This ambitious Bohemian is an annexationist of the first 
water, a communist cm a large scale, and tickles our national vanity 
With an elephantine straw. If he keeps on he will justly earn the 
proud name of the " great American gobbler." His thirst for terri- 
tory is insatiable. First, he wants the Dominion of Canada and 
British North America annexed to " the greatest Republic the world 
has ever seen." This lie follows up with a generous desire to gobble 
up the northwestern States of Mexico, and has even suggested the 
propriety of taking under the wings of the great American eagle 
the Republics of Guatemala and Central America. In his wholesale 
desire for more mud, he has overlooked such luscious specks of dirt 
as San Domingo, Cuba and the Sandwich Islands, imagining, per- 
haps, that these would some day float to Plymouth Rock or Cape 
Cod, and there anchor themselves for the especial benefit of Uncle 
Sam, his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, for all time to 
come. It seems that this wag may be inclined to irony, but whether 
this be the case or not, it shall not decrease the musical effect of our 
snoring so long as Coat Island is not created an asylum for insane 
scribblers. 

Why people with suicidal likings don't get the little business done 
for them instead of doing it themselves is rather strange. When the 
yearning for a big spell of unconsciousness conies over them, one 
fancies they could find plenty of ways of attaining the end, and at 
the same time leaving a little heritage of happiness to the dear ones 
behind. There's the railroad track, for instance. There is moderate 
certainty with it, as was proven by a set of figures in a paper lately, 
and the dear ones behind are quite sure of drawing a thousand or so 
from a rich corporation. Then there's the ferry-boat. You can 
easily fall into the water, and if you simply put your hands into your 
pockets there, you are right into your spell at once, and your heirs 
will get twice your value from somebody. The spirit of self help 
can be carried too far, and the man who goes and takes his own life, 
with such opportunities before him as public companies supply, must 
be insanely fond of work, and insanely heartless to those he ought 
to assist. 

I have not heard much recently of those two eminent players of 
the labor shuttlecock with the oratorical battledoor, Messrs. George 
and McGlynn. By the dollars of Midas, our friend Harry has made 
the agitation business pay like a mint. Xot so the unfortunate priest 
whom he led to join his retinue. McGlynn had nothing to gain and 
everything to lose, and when it comes to a question of dividends I 
doubt very much if the gentle Harry will permit hini to get much of 
his hand into the anti-poverty pot. Well, as long as the people want 
leaders, somebody has got to act as bell-wether. But there cannot 
be two in the business, and Mr. George, being theiirston the ground, 
will run the box-office to suit his own ideas. 



I h.i ollsfa young men who In 

that malicious miachjel is the natural consummation ol 

i here is .1 species of Angl 
which should be promptly pin down It develops Itself In tl 
structi on ol personal property, the pulling down of signs, the n 
al ol portable ornaments rrom house fronts, and other rowdy si 
demonstrations ol that class. 1 old 01 niiddli 

gentlemen who commil those Ibly think thai the 

ttionof the foaming goblet is sufficient apology for their on- 
1 . n few nights ago since two valuable 
iron dogs weir carried off from the picturesque residenu 
man on Claj street, ami deposited on the front step of a well-known 
real estate operator. The attention of the police should be called to 
those absurd freaks, for I hold that the man who steals an Iroi 
rrom a gentleman's residence 1- nol less guilty than he who breaks 
into bis dining-room and snaffles Ins silver spo 

That the white cooks ani waiters have returned to work i> a 
matter of general congratulation. Not that anj ularlv 

cares whether the cook who prepares his food Is white, Mark or sal- 
mon colored, but the meetings, and speeches and manifestos of those 
people have grown intolerably wearisome. I do not believe in the 
white waiter myself, unless he he of French or Italian birth. The 
fellow born to the proud Inheritance of this free republic i^ usually a 
surly, saucy knave, who earns his -alary under protest. IU- moves 
on an elevated plateau, miles and miles above the nervous and un- 
easy guest who issues his order with a sort of mild apology in his 
tone for troubling such an exalted tret- man. l! the white conk in the 
kitchen is no better than the white waiter in the dining-room, the 
sooner all white Americana declare this condition of servitude base, 
and unbecoming the dignity of man, the better for all who are com- 
pelled to call upon their unwillingly rendered and sulky services. 

The love of angling is implanted so deep in some bosoms that they 
will brave all weathers for the delight of dragging a wretched fish from 
his pool. Forty men returned from Marin County a week ago Sunday 
wiih live fish, representing the entire catch of thirty-six hours. They 
were half frozen and wholly rheumatic. They had sat for hours on a 
stretch, watching a float blown about, the ire-strewn surface of the 
stream. Yet in all other relations of life the sanity of these men 
would pass unquestioned. I will say nothing about the lies they told 
upon their return. This is the fisherman's privilege, and none de- 
served it better than this unfortunate band of deluded anglers. One 
poor wretch, paralyzed with the cold, was taken home in a hack, 
Bugging a young sturgeon to his breast, the only reward of forty- 
eight hours' exposure to the Arctic cold. Oddsnshl but his wife 
should have thawed him out with the broom. 

The " Call." which is nothing if not strictly accurale, mentions in 
its report of the killing of the romantic Swede that Captain Lees, 
" who was fast asleep in bed at the time, heard the shot." Now, 
while i am willing to acknowledge that Captain Lees is a vigilant de- 
tective, I object upon having this statement crammed dnjvn the 
throat of the public, the Captain's residence being so far from the 
scene of the shooting that unless the shot bad been fired within a fool 
of the diaphragm of a telephone, and the Captain's ear resting peace- 
fully within an inch of the other end. To make the item more per- 
fect, the reporter should have added that the Captain not only heard 
the shot, but " smelt the powder." 

That dear old war speck is again occupying the attention of the 
European news gatherers. Odd that with all the hook-making and 
newspapers, and progress of civilization, and spread of Christianity, 
and extension of philanthropy, and growth of art. and culture, and 
the rest of it, humanity should take more solid pleasure in reading 
about pugilism, and war specks, and dynamite shells, and dire pre- 
parations for throat-cutting, than any other topic under the sun. Yes, 
Telemachus, the world is growing very good, out 1 tell you the smell 
of blood is sweeter in the nostrils of the noblest animal than all 
other perfumes combined. 

A man— or, rather, a fiend— at Kingston. Texas, killed his wife, 
and then, having taken all the flesh off her bones, ground it up and 
sold it in town as sausage meat. As she was, of course, old and ugly. 
the consumers are not pleased with the idea thai they have gobbled 
the old lady up in mistake for the true American hog. So great, in- 
deed, is their indignation, that probably before this goes to press the 
husband will have been lynched— not so much on account of killing 
his wife, as for destroying the digestions of many citizens of King- 
ston, and ruining for all time the hitherto spotless reputation of 
sausage meat. 

I am rejoiced that the Examiner kid racket has worked so well. As 
a matter of fact, one of the most successful ways of whooping up a 
newspaper is to get the kids interested. It gives the wily manager of 
the kid puzzle department full swing to call them little darlings and 
little dears and rosy-cheeked beauties, and thus the parents catch on. 
It is one of the venerable chestnuts of newspaper push that never 
cankers. 

The young printer who shot his foreman was let off with six 
months in the County Jail. This ruling may have the effect of bring- 
ing the long-standing feud between the editor and the proof-reader to 
ahead Twenty-four hours for maiming the ordinary proof-reader 
would be the severest penalty any just judge could impose. 

Denis Kearny has been promised a hearing on the Chinese ques- 
tion by the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. Ere Denis gets 
half through the House Committee will wish it had knocked its col- 
lective head against the walls of the Committee room before turning 
on the faucet of the California blatherskite. 

The druggists are reaping a nice harvest from the epidemic. In- 
deed as far as one of those gentlemen are concerned, it would appear 
that 'a small-pox visitation, though not a thing of beauty, is a Joy 
forever. Anyhow, Edwin Joy found it so, though the Board of 
Health made some wry grimaces at the length of his bill. 

What amuses me is that people will pay one dollar for a common 
bath brick, advertised as indestructible fuel, when the same thing 
can be bought of the corner grocery for five cents. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



MARION. 

From brighter climes and sunnier skies 

And realms un dimmed by mortal woe 
The favoring gales of Paradise, 

Wafted a gift to us below. 
A dainty bud, a fragile bloom, 

A lily white as drifting snow, 
Wc gave the lovely stranger room, 

And day by day we watched it grow. 
But ah! 'twas not for us to hold 

In our fond clasp the exile rare, 
The chilling storms of earthly cold 

Touched with untimely frost our care. 
Life faded from love-lighted eyes, 

Its feeble hold unloosed from earth, 
And she whose home was in the skies 

Sighed a farewell to luortal birth. 
But springing from the sacred dust, 

Enriched and moistened with our tears, 
Grew living words and deeds of trust, 

Radiating light through weary years. 
And she whose loving spirit shed 

Such gentle fragrance through our home, 
"Whose child-like trust still upward led 

Our weary feet amid earth's gloom, 
Now sheds abroad life's healing ray, 

Shining across the breakers' foam, 
Lighting ten thousand in the Way 

And Word of life to lead them home. 



Tide. 



SCIENCE, YOU KNOW. 

A Danish, gentleman has investigated the law of human growth, 
and drawn a curve to represent it, which looks like an angleworm 
going uphill; and Astronomer Proctor has tried the same game on 
the little Proctors and constructed their curves, which resemble other 
angleworms going up other hills. This is scientific and consequently 
beautiful, and is capable of wider application. The Examiner, now, 
might work out a graphic representation of its increase in circulation, 
and compare it with the trajectory of a C'ongreve rocket; or average 
up the (fall's tariff editorials against the statistics of American idiocy, 
and show wherein the two differ. A graphic representation of the 
number of drinks taken by the staff on the successive days of the 
week, beginning with pay-day, might be examined to see whether the 
decrease is in a geometrical or only an arithmetical ratio. This would 
be very scientific and proportionately instructive. Even the softer 
sex (which is therefore pleasanter to the feel) could be brought within 
the scope of quantitative and qualitative examination. It is safe to 
predict -that their curves would present a bewildering but still de- 
lightful variety. The law of vanishing increment in respect of age 
in this sex has always been obscure; so has that of accelerating nice- 
ness, and the culmination of the last has never been fixed. My Lord 
Byron's dictum in favor of forty (when fair and fairly fat) was that 
of a connoisseur. But the most fruitful field for investigation would 
perhaps lie in the domain of intellect. Thus, if a line were drawn 
from the towering intelligence of the News Letter, for example, to 
the zero-point afforded by that of the Call, and Mr. Proctor and a 
wooden Indian were ranged between, and Prof. Holden were then to 
heave half a brick at the Indian and. hit Mr. Proctor, and Mr. Proctor 
should copyright the brick and the Examiner publish it, would that 
be scientific? It would be at least as instructive and as valuable as 
the Proctorian angleworms. 

Somebody's Child. 
Somebody's child is dying— dying with the flush of hope on its young 
face, and somebody's mother thinking of the time when that dear face will 
be hidden where no ray of hope can brighten it— because there was no 
cure for consumption. Header, if the child be your neighbor's, take this 
comforting word to the mother's heart before it is too late. Tell her that 
consumption is curable; that men are living to-day whom the physicians 
pronounced incurable, because one lung had been almost destroyed by the 
disease. Dr. Pierce's "Golden Medical Discovery" has cured hundreds; 
surpasses cod-liver oil, hypophosphites and other medicines in curing this 
disease. Sold by druggists. 



Beautiful Women 
are made pallid and unattractive by functional irregularities, which I>r. 
Pierce's "Favorite Prescription " will infallibly cure. Thousand of testi- 
monials. By druggists. 



Dr. Pierce's " Pellets "—the original " Little Liver Pills " (sugar-coated)— 
cure sick and bilious headache, sour stomach and bilious attacks. By 
druggists. 



A New"¥ork exchange remarks: In the California set of this citv, 
which includes the Verdenals, the Harpendings and others, the talk 
now is that all hones of the marriage between young Hearst and 
Miss Eleanor Calhoun are lost, and the marriage is definitely off. The 
old Senator, whose wild and picturesque ways nave often amused, if 
they have not instructed, the United States Senate, was not averse to 
the match, but mamma would not have it. The young California 
actress that the Hearst family stood sponsor for, it seems, however, 
had more than one string to her bow, and now the story is that Fred 
Winston will, when the Lenten season is over, lead her to the altar. 
Fred, albeit the son of our ex-Minister to Persia, is not by any means 
the catch that young Hearst would have been, but he is a fine, good- 
looking young gentleman, and he will suffice. 

D. Albert Hiller, M. D., 1011 Sutter street, San Francisco, California. 



California Title Insurance and Trust Company, 

No. 206 Sansome Street. 

THE TRUST DEPARTMENT OF THIS COMPANY undertakes the 
management of estates and acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, 
Assignee, Receiver, Depository, Trustee, Agent, Attorney, etc.; also, as 
Register and Transfer Agent of the Stock of Incorporated Companies. 
All Trust Funds Kept Separate. 

OFFICERS: 

GEO. T. MARYE, Jr President 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE Vice-President 

MILTON B. CLAPP Secretary 

NEVADA BANK .Treasurer 

A. D. GRIMWOOD Manager 

[Jan. 28.J 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL ; {5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE <5c CO., 

Nov. IS,] No. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

ALL THE POLICIES OF THE 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF BOSTON 

ARE PROTECTED FROM FORFEITURE BY THE 
NEW MASSACHUSETTS NON-FORFEITURE LAW. 

Tne Company iudorses the liberal and yearly Progressive CASH SUR- 
RENDER and PAID-UP INSURANCE values prescribed by the lawin full in 
tabular form on every policy, thus giving the policy the convenieut form 
of A BOND OF YEARLY INCREASING VALUE, and the Policy-holder may 
thus at any time know the precise value of his Policy. 

l&- Before insuring in any other Company, or joining any Co-operative 
Assessment Society, consult any local agent of this Company, or the un- 
dersigned, HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

March 26.J 324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Principal Office 416 California Street 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital $ 750,000 

Assets, Over 1,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co, of California. 

officers: 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD. . President I J. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

JaS. D. BAILEY Secretary. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL $1 0.000,000. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco, 

JAMES DRTJMMOND MACPHERS0N, Manager. 

London Office — No, 2 Royal Exchange Avenue, Cornhill, E. C. [March 5. 

ANGLO-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, $2,000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

Bankers: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[Sept. 10.1 

AMERICAN STEAM BOILER INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF NEW YORK CITY. 

CAPITAL AUTHORIZED $1,000,000 

CAPITAL PAID UP $500,000 

Policies cover all loss or damage to PROPERTY or LIFE resulting 
Irom Explosion or Rupture of Steam Boilers. Inspections quarterly 
by Skilled Inspectors. 

CONRAD & MAXWELL, 

(Fire and Marine Underwriters,) 

Aug. 27.] Gen'l Agts. for Pacific Coast, 421 California St. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

CAPITAL $1,600,000.00 

SURPLUS 214,210,18 

ASSETS, Jan. 1st. 1886 1.192,662.21 

INVESTED IN the U. S 501,866.48 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky 
Mountains. [Dec. 31. 



Jan. 28, 188*. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



15 



AUSTRALASIAN NOTES. 
By the steamship "Zealaadia/ 1 \\ hlch iirrlved m the baj on Batur- 

aay evening lest, we beve our usual Antipodean advices. The 

leiu]>erance people and tli<- liquor dealers Iiave been engaged In a 
straggle over Bomefreeh Liquor legislation in the Victorian Parlia- 
ment. The legislation local option in h* nature passed. A piece 

ui land on the corner ol Collins street and ('ollina place, Melbourne, 

has been sold for 16,600 per foot. Hon. W. Lt. Plddlngton, of N. 8. 

W., 1* dead. Be arnvv.l in tin- Colonies fifty years ago. The 

Queensland Government ha- renewed its mail contract with the 
British- India Steam Navigation < 'ompany for one rear. Better ships 

are to be put on the line. a new find of gold is reported from 

Gorney'e Creek, on the weal coast "i Tasmania. Mr. J. N. Brown, 

a Tasraanian representative in the Federal Council, has declined to 

establish a precedent by resigning at the request of the Ministry. 

Tin- people of the Riverine district, N. S. W., have petitioned the 
Home Government i<> !»<■ annexed to Victoria.— Victorian cadets 

arc to be admitted Into the imperial navv. The revenue estimates 

of the Queensland Ministry Bhowadelicft «>i (440,000. The desira- 
bility «.i establishing in the Colonies a branch of the Royal Naval Re- 
serve is being agitated. The revenue of New Sooth Wales is ex- 

m cted t«» show a deficit ot $780,000 for the current fiscal year. The 

New South Wall- Government has decided to fence its South Austra- 
lian border with rabbit-proof wire netting. Then- exists a great 

deal ft dissatisfaction in regard t«» the examination system of the 

Melbourne University. The Hon. Mr. DibbS. Colonial Treasurer 

under the Stewart Government, has sued the Sydney Daily Telegraph 
for libel. The Language complained of is as follows: "He knows that 
then- is m existence at this moment documentary and other evidence 

of hi- crii al manipulation of the * Colony's finances." Damages are 

laid at 1100,000. A firm of contractors has offered to build the new 

State House for the News.. nth Wales Government for $1,125,000 if 

freestone be used, and tor 81,775,000 if granite be employed. The 

financial statement ol sir Henry Parkea is a disappointment to most 
of that gentleman's friends, ftia conduct, Loo, in regard to the pro- 
posed changing of the name of New South Wales to Australia, has 

disgusted many of his followers. There has been a slight change in 

of the Queensland Government. * ■■ ' T he Speaker of the 
New South Walis Parliament suspended one after another of the 
< Opposition members who rose to protest against a ruling of his, until 
be bad pretty much cleared the house of the oponents of the Minis- 
try. Then be put an important motion, which emanated from the 
Opposition, and declared it lost. The Marquis of Salisbury should 

rapture tliis gentleman. The Queensland Parliament has been 

.led. and will soon be dissolved and a new one elected. The 

Victorian railroad- are doing remarkably well from a financial stand- 
point this year. The Home Government favors the establishment 

of responsible government in Western Australia. Railway offices 

are to be erected at the junction of Flinders and Spencer streets, at a 

cost of $500,000. Hush tires have been prevalent throughout New 

South Wab--., and the weather has been very hot. The Municipal 

Government 6*1 Sydnej is reducing its expenses as much as possible. 

An extensive tin lode is reported to have been discovered he tween 

and Biarsleigh rivers, about 100 miles southeast of George- 
town, Queensland. The discovery of the artesian water supply at 

Barcaldine, Queensland, has given a great impetus to land selection 
in the district. Nearly 100,000 acres is applied for.— The proposal 
to "protect" agricultural products in New South Wales has been 
negatived. Drought has caused serious injury to the crops in Tas- 
mania. The financial proposals of the New Zealand Government 

have been carried, and Parliament has been prorogued.— —A "Select 
Committee" of the New South Wales Parliament is to inquire into 
the Chinese "question" in all the Colonies. 



AS TO SWIFT CRUISERS. 
A daily contemporary thinks that the new cruiser Atlanta, in 
point of speed and strength, is equal to anything afloat, and we have 
no objection to bis so thinking, if it pleases him to dwell in an at- 
mosphere of romance of his own creating. The readers of the News 
Letter, who, with cause, pin their faith to its accuracy of statement, 
will be glad to be better informed. The Atlanta, as a fast dispatch 
boat, is far ahead of anything our navy has heretofore possessed, 
which is not saying much'. She steamed on her trial trip a little over 
fifteen knots an hour. She is believed to be a stanch vessel, but is 
not armor-plated. She will credibly represent this peaceful country 
in whatever waters she appears, but so far from being the strongest 
and fastest cruiser afloat, she would be nowhere alongside the latest 
cruisers of the unhappy nations that are compelled to show their 
teeth to each other, and be always prepared for war. Now that we 
are building cruisers, it will be worth while to know how the facts 
are. The British Government has just completed the seventh ship of 
8 i lass of " powerfully armed belted cruisers," designed for the pro- 
tection of the national commerce. She is 300 feet long between per- 
pendiculars, 5G feet beam, 37 feet in depth of hold, and has a dis- 
placement of 5,000 tons. The armor-belt, which protects the entire 
water-line, is from 10 to 1G inches thick, according to its location. 
All the machinery of vital importance is. in addition, defended by 
coal armor. In Case of penetration, her buoyancy is still secured by 
the minute subdivisions in which she is built. She is armed with two 
22-ton breach-loaders, ten 0-inch guns, eight G-pounders and as many 
3-pound quick-firing guns. The speed attained, as the mean of four 
trial trips, was 19.081 knots pernour. The French Government is 
also budding strong armor-plated cruisers. The Dupuy-ilc-Lome is 
capable of steaming 20 knots per hour, and carries even heavier guns 
and thicker armor than the seven cruisers recently completed for the 
English Government. 

This is leap yeah, but we would advise the girls to look before they 
leap, and be sure that they are securing a man who buys his Underwear 
and Gent's Furnishing Goods from J. W. Carmauy, No. 25 Kearny street. 



Corpulent persons who desire to avail themselves of the oppor 
fcunity can now patronize a London restaurant in which nothing but 
dishes prepared on the anti-fat plan are served. 



T3srsu^A.isrcE. 



Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
United States Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1824.1 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.1 
Western Assurance Company of Toronto, Canada [Estab. 1851, ] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gcn'l Agent* for the Pacific Coast. 
Jl,1 >' Ifi J 413 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
FIBE -A-JSTID M-A-RHTE. 

CAPITAL STOCK Pi Id Up J400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AMD 220 SAHS0M£ STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
A. J. BRYANT, CHAS. 11 << SUING, C. D. OSM.L1YAN, 

Presideut Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board op Dirrctors— C. D. OSullivau, J. M. Donahue, P. J. White, 
James i>. Pnelan, r>. Callaghan, M. Mayblum, K. L. Goldstein, L Cunning. 
ham, II. \v. Stale, Fisher Ames, l>r. C. F. Buckley, Dr. \\m. Jones, Q. H 
Wheaton, T. McMullIn , A. J. Bryant. Jan. 2*. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed 910,000.000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund fin addition to Capital! 2,125,000 

Total Assets July 1, 1887. 5,809,629 

WM 



July If,.] 



GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street. San Francisco. 



THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Cupilal, '.,000,000 FraUOB. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISEof Basle— *>ipitiil,, r >,O00,(X.u H'rmn's. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all Ionises that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to thecouditiousaud CUBtoms adopted at Lloyds, 
aud submit to Euglish jurisdiction. 1IAKKV W. HVZ, Agent, 110 California 
street, Sim Francisco. [Juue y.J 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

FIBE AUSTP ZMZA-ZBTHSriE. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full $ 200.000.00 

ASSETS, lanuary I, 1887 446.611.09 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized 1,681.849.61 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
CHAS. A. LatON, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). [March 19.] San Francisco, Cal. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000. 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Corporation of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
WM. MACDONALD, Ass't Manager. 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, Sale Deposit Building. 



THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL ?10,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent, 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cai, [March 19. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764.875 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March 20. 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 

Princinal Office SlB Sansome Street 

rrmcipai vmce FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital Paid Up In U. S. Gold Coin $300,000.00 

Assets January 1 1887 . . .$780,606.22 I Reinsurance Reserve . . .? 220,979.66 
Surplus for policy holders.. 774,734.22 Losses since organization. 2,533,105.80 
NetBurplusfoverev'ryth'g) 2.^3.754.56 | Income 1886 361,132.44 

J F HOUGHTON . President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J L N SHEPARD, . . .Vice-President I R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

'Directors OF the Home Mutual Insurance Co.— L.L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, 
J L N Shepard John Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauncey T aylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryland, A. K. P. Harm o n. [March 5 . 

DIVIDEND No. 148. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar (?1) per share upon its 
capital stock on January 10th, 1888. 
Jan . u .j CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



THE REAL PROPERTY MARKET. 

It certainly cannot be said that the real estate people are sparing 
either time or money to advance the trade in real property. The 
advertisements of the dealers in this commodity just now occupy 
quite a space in the daily and weekly papers, andit may be taken for 
granted that the efforts made in this manner will sooner or later re- 
sult in a harvest of buyers and commissions. The time was not long 
ago when real estate was not advertised to any extent in the papers. 
It was done quietly and decorously in back offices, as if the parties 
participating shunned the light of day. Auctions were very seldom 
thought ot except when courts ordered property to be disposed of in 
that manner, and then a sale at auction was not considered a test of 
the market at all. There has been a change from all this. The suc- 
cessful real estate broker is no longer a cross between a parson and 
lawyer. He has evolved into a live man of business, who has to be 
at three places at once, knows the value of printers' ink, and does 
not save it in crying his wares. The public also seems to have learn- 
ed to look upon real estate with different eyes. To buy or to sell is 
no longer an extraordinary affair, and even women attend auction 
sales, and bid and buy as if the affair was the sale of second-hand 
furniture. It is this change of attitude which has made auction 
sales successful, and in a large measure it has been the strong lever 
which has moved the real estate into a booming condition in the 
south. Real estate is being dealt in almost as freely as ordinary 
merchandise; it is carried on margins, held on options and bonded, 
and if under these conditions, backed up as they are by the exertions 
of a whole regiment of active and shrewd dealers, the general public 
is not perforce made acquainted with the advantages and prospects 
of real estate, and is made to go in and buy, then there is something 
wrong in human nature. 

There is certainly every reason to anticipate a sharp demand for 
real estate during the entire year now opening. Glimpses of the time 
to come can be had from day to day, as, for instance, at the auction 
sale of the block bounded by Oak, rage, Cole and Shrader streets, in 
the Western Addition, on Tuesday last. Thirty-eight lots were offered 
and sold, the aggregate sura realized being $67,400— not so bad a fig- 
ure when it is remembered that a few years ago the block could have 
been had at from $35,000 to $40,000. Here, then, we have an advance 
of nearly 100 per cent., say, since 1880. And yet people will say that 
San Francisco is retrogressing, and all that sort of nonsense. What 
is particularly encouraging about this matter is that the advance has 
not the slightest element of speculation about it. It is safe to assert 
that not one of the purchasers at the sale is willing to sell his acquisi- 
tion to-day at the price for which he bought it. 

As to the prices paid at last Tuesday's sale, considering the fact 
that this block fronts directly on Golden Gate Park, they would seem 
to be low rather than high. The corner lots, each 31:3x100, brought 
the following prices: Corner Oak and Cole streets, $2,650; corner Oak 
and Shrader, $2,575; corner Page and Shrader, $2,1)50; and corner 
Page and Cole, $2,800. All the other lots were 25x100 and 25x137:6 in 
size, and sold at varying rates. Those fronting on Oak street, lOOfeet 
deep, went at from $1,375 to $1,075, and those 137:0 feet deep at $1,750. 
Shrader street lots sold at $1,375; Page street lots, 25x100, at from 
$1,575 to $1,625, and 25x137:6 at from $1,825 to $1,875; and the Cole 
street lots, 25x106:3, at $1,525 and $1,550. The sale is considered as a 
most reassuring event. 

Private dealings continue quite slow, more so than the brokers 
have expected them to be at this particular time. Their expectations 
that the market would become generally active immediately after 
New Year's have not been realized, for the market remains practi- 
cally in an unchanged condition. It is still difficult to bring buyer 
and seller together, and, if possible, the latter is more unyielding 
than ever. The leading transaction was the sale of the south-west 
corner of Folsom and Beale streets, 29x137:6, for $47,500. 

Another sale south of Market^street was 28:10x82:6 on the east side 
of Fourth street, 51:2 north ot Everett, for $20,500. Two sales in 
same locality bat of less importance were the following: 20x80 on 
the north side of Howard street, 370 feet west of Third, $6,500. 25x70 
on the east side of Fourth street, 80 feet north of Folsom street. Of 
the Horace Hawes estate there was sold 125x85 on the south side of 
Caroline street, 100 feet east of Howard. 

At the North Beach a sale has been made of 87:6x93:6 on the south- 
east corner of Chestnut and Stockton streets. This concludes the 
list of transations in the older portions of the city. 

In the Western Addition, the Mission and in outside lands, busi- 
ness has not at all improved during last week. There is said to be 
less demand for Western Addition property than there has been 
heretofore, though, of course, the success of the various auction sales 
seems to be a sufficient denial of the assertion. But it still cannot be 
denied that privately very little is being done in this kind of property. 
However, it is likely to improve as the season advances. Among the 
sales were: 55x127:8 on the south side of Pacific street, 82:0 feet west 
of Broderick, and a lot of like size on the same street, 165 feet west of 
Broderick; also 92:6x132:7 on the north side of California street, 175 
feet east of Walnut; 24x103 on the east side of Devisadero street, 25 
feet south of Haight, $7,200; 44x102:8 on the north side of Washing- 
ton street, 47 feet east of Steiner ; 127x137 :6 on the north side of Green 
street, 137 :G feet west of Pierce; and 50x120 on the south side of 
Haight street, 206:3 feet west of Fillmore. 

The list of sales in the Mission is not much longer. The most im- 
portant sales made there were as follows: 65x137:6 on the southwest 
corner of Twenty-third and Church streets; 25x75 on the east side of 
Valencia, 25 feet north of Twenty-third street; 80x114 on the south- 
west corner of Twenty-fifth and Castro streets; 50x114 on the south 
side of Twentieth street, 50 feet west of Guerrero. $5,000; and lOOx 
115:0 on the west side of Diamond street, 60 feet north of Twenty- 
third street. 

Ln outside lands the principal transaction was the sale of Block 
808, at the southwest corner of K street and 40th avenue, for $5,000. 
Block 998 also changed owners, for a consideration not made public, 
as did also block 195, on the southeast corner of Clement street and 
15th avenue. 

For artistic Japauese Goods go to G. T. Marsh <fc Co., under Palace Hotel. 



'■ARTISTIC HOMES OF CALIFORNIA." 
No. 55. 

Residence of Me. J. M. Buffington, Oakland. 

One of the most artistic residences in Oakland is that of Mr. J. M. 
Buffing ton. It belongs to the new order of architecture, in which the 
gothic gable plays an important part. The house was built several 
years ago, consequently the grassy sidewalks and the garden are in a 
fine state of cultivation. A very pretty iron fence, low, and rising 
from a brick foundation, incloses the grounds. The house itself is 
picturesque, this effect being hightened by the parti-colored and 
ornamented exterior. The basement portion is of a dark green. 
Above that is a band of dark terra cotta color, which is repeated in 
the window-casings. The first story is dark-red, then a band of olive. 
Above that, in fancy shingles, is "the second story, in light green. 
The gables are ornamented with disks of contrasting colors, while 
the small square panes of glass in the upper sash of each window 
give a Queen Ann aspect to the house. The front porch is well pro- 
tected by its arched roof. A pair of double doors with art glass 
sashes, open directly into the square hall. The stair-case is not 
visible. On the right is the parlor, a very pretty room, handsomely 
furnished. On the left is the library, which has' one corner enlarged 
by the projecting square bay window, with art glass panes, medalions 
in the center. 

Beyond the library is the sitting-room. The dining-room has a 
large bay window. Beyond are the kitchen, pantries, side-entrance 
and basement stairs. 

The house is furnace-heated and the service is electric. Through- 
out the house the mantels and gas-fixtures are very pretty. In the 
second story are the sleeping apartments, closetsj bath-room and 
servants' bed-room. 



ii 



ALEXANDRE" KID GLOVES! 



1 TELEPHONE No. 3240 1- 




MURPHY BUILDING, 
MARKET STREET, CORNER JONES, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Pixley says the American party is too young to quarrel. But the 
quarreling of political parties, like the crying of babies, comes on at 
a singularly early age, and why should it not? If the baby cannot 
cry the chances are that there is not much life in its little body, and 
similarly, if a political party does not have its bickerings, the indica- 
tion is that there is not much vigor in its composition. The early 
quarrelings of the American party is a healthy sign, and would seem 
to betoken that Grand Master Boruck has some good things to hand 
round that are deemed worth quarreling over. It is not every politi- 
cal party that so soon comes into possession of the bone of contention. 

Young Rural (in a New York restaurant, showing off before his 
girl)— "waiter, bring us a bottle of champagne." Waiter— " Yes, 
sir. Dry?" Young Rural (hotly)—" It's none of your infernal busi- 
ness whether we are dry or not! Just you bring it." 



Having been appointed SOLE AGENTS in San Francisco for the sale of 
the Celebrated " Alexandre " Kid Gloves, we take pleasure in anaouuciag 
to the general public that we have in stock complete lines of these Gloves, 
of all lengths, shades and sizes, with plain and embroidered backs. 

That these GLOVES rank as the very finest among all competitors for 
public favor, is fully conceded, they being well and favorably known 
throughout the country for years, as the 

HIGHEST-CLASS KID GLOVE 

sold by the late A. T. Stewart <& Co., of New York. 

We cordially invite close inspection of these Excellent Gloves by the 
ladies of this Coast, confident that the Glove will win favor here, as it 
always has, wherever known. 



Orders by Mail or Telephone Promptly Executed. 
(Joods delivered free of carriage charges in Berkeley, Oakland, Ala- 
meda and Fruitvale. 



Eclipse Extra Dry \ 



Finer than the class of Champagnes 
sent from France to this country, but 
without Brandy. 




P s 



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oo a 

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c- S 
QC I 






Jon. 28, 1888. BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR. 



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£?J>&^16M *H 6^*^r-/r*/^ #"4. * 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



BIZ." 



The arrivals of deep-water vessels from foreign ports have of late 
been quite numerous, and their cargoes have added largely to our 
stock of Goals, Cement, Iron and general merchandise. Some of the 
ships from the "United Kingdom, as well as from the Colonies, having 
made exceedingly rapid voyages. A goodly number of ships have 
been chartered to load Wheat and Flour to Great Britain, while 
others have been secured to proceed to the English Colonies in bal- 
last to return to this port Coal-laden. Grain freights are now down 
to bed-rock prices. Advices from England note the departure of an 
unusual number of Coal-laden vessels for San Diego. This is a new 
feature of the trade, and goes to show the rapid growth and import- 
ance of San Diego as a port of entry. The continental railroads 
now centering at that point are the cause of all this. Unfortunately, 
the bulk of all this tonnage will, after discharging their inward cargo 
of Coals, be compelled to go elsewhere for an outward cargo home- 
wards. 

The first fortnight of the month of January was remarkable for un- 
usually cold weather (though, so far as advised, 20 deg. above zero 
was the lowest point touched hereabouts); and since the cold snap 
we have had a week or more of falling weather, warm rains having 
been quite general throughout the length and breadth of our wide 
domain, dispelling the frost and giving grass and grain a tine start. 
The outlook for a year of unusual prosperity upon the Pacific Coast 
is exceedingly promising. 

The great increase of our population demands a large amount of 
building for their accommodation, and thus the Lumber and Coal in- 
terests of the coast will be largely developed during 1888. The Red- 
wood Lumber Association have placed their wholesale prices at $19 
per 1,000 feet for rough boards, $15 for refuse; merchantable, $36@$40 
per 1,000. 

Overland freights Eastward bound, for the year 1887, were less than 
those for the year preceding. The total for 1886 of tons of 2,000 lbs. 
each was 154,028, and in 1S87 was 127,852. The largest single item 
hence from San Francisco in 1880 was Sugar, 51,883 lbs. ; 1887,27,271 
lbs. ; showing a large falling off last year. The next largest item was 
Wine, in 1886, 17,841 tons; 1887, 18 180; Wool, in 1886, 11,602 tons; 
1887, 8,513 tons; of Canned Goods in 1887 a large increase. 

Iron ships to Cork for orders may be quoted at 25s. asked, and this 
is the rate offered for ships to proceed to Australia in ballast to return 
here with Coal. Details of charters for the period under review are 
as follows: Br. iron ship Parthenope, 1,503 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
Havre or Antwerp, £1 4s; Br. iron ship Micronesia, 1,577 tons, Wheat 
to Cork, Havre, or Antwerp, £1 3s. 9d. — nothing less direct; Br. iron 
ship Eleanor Margaret, 2,342 tons, Wheat to Cork, Havre or Antwerp, 
£1 3s.; Br. iron ship City of Florence, 1,200 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
owner's account; Br. iron bark Earl Granville, 950 tons, merchandise 
to Hamburg direct, £1 7s. 6d. ; Br. iron ship Peterborough, 1,680 tons, 
Lumber from Puget Sound to Valparaiso for orders, £2, direct port, 
£1 17s. 6d. ; Br. iron ship The Douglass, 1,428 tons, merchandise to 
Santa Rosalia, thence to the Gulf of California to load Nitrate for 
United Kingdom; ship Willie Rosenfeld, 2,359 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
Havre or Antwerp, £1 Is. 3d. ; Br. iron ship M. E, Watson, 1,67010ns, 
Wheat to Cork, Havre or Antwerp, £1 3s. 9d.— nothing less direct; 
Br. iron ship W. T. Pirrie, 2,516 tons, proceeds in ballast to Manila to 
load return cargo of Sugar; ship John A. Briggs, 2,033 tons, Coal 
from Nanaimo to this port; Br. iron ship Earl of Dalhousie, 1,077 
tons, Coal from Nanaimo to this port; Br. iron ship Larnaca, 1,435 
tons, proceeds to Portland in ballast, presumably to load Wheat, 
thence for United Kingdom ; ship J. B. Walker, 2,105 tons, Coal from 
Seattle to this port; Br. iron ships Beecroft, 1,026 tons, Grisedale, 
1,222 tons, and Wasdale, 1,821 tons, proceed to Australia under orders 
from owners, probably to load back with Coal ; Br. iron bark Sard- 
hana, 1,119 tons, Wheat or Flour to Cork, £1 6d.— direct 2s. 6d. less; 
Ger. iron ship Richard Wagner, 2,026 tons, Wheat to Liverpool direct, 
21s. ; Br. iron bark Kooringa, 1,175 tons, Lumber from Puget Sound 
to Melbourne Wharf , £2 12s. 0d.; Br. iron ship Amana, 1,299 tons, 
Lumber from Puget Sound to Melbourne Wharf, £2 12s. 6d. ; Br. iron 
ship .Eolus, 1,610 tons, Lumber from Puget Sound to Melbourne 
Wharf, £2 12s. 6d.; ship P. M. Whitmore, 2,140 tons, proceeds from 
this port to Sydney to load return cargo of Coal; ship St. David, 1,536 
tons, now at this port, proceeds to Sydney to load return cargo of 
Coal; bark Colusa, 1,188 tons, now at San Diego, loads Sugar at Hon- 
olulu for this port; bark W. W. Case, 555 tons, now at San Diego, 
loads Sugar at Kahului for this port; bark Annie Johnson, 949 tons, 
now at San Diego, loads cannery supplies from this port to Newshagah ; 
Br. bark Seiriol Wyn, 1,458 tons, Lumber from Port Blakely to Mel- 
bourne, £2 12s. Oil.— chartered in England; Br. iron bark James 
Livesey, 1,072 tons, Lumber from Puget Sound to Valparaiso for 
orders, £2 2s. 6d. ; Br. bark Sir William Wallace, 968 tons. Lumber 
from Port Gamble to Sydney, owners' account. 

The stock of Calcutta Grain Bags here and to arrive is said to be 
concentrated in the hands of a well known and prominent dealer. 
This causes a very firm market in view of the promised favorable 
outlook for a large grain crop the coming season. Spot price, 1)4®. 
iyic.\ June-July delivery, same. 

The steamer City oE Rio de Janeiro,, hence January 21st for the 
Orient, carried the following treasure: To Hongkong, $319,725; to 
Bombay, $132,300; to Hiogo, $48,000. 

The stock of sugar which had last week become nearly exhausted 
has happily been replenished by free arrivals from Hawaii, Central 
America and Manila. Other cargoes, also, are fully due at this port. 
The 4,00!) tons Island Sugar lost per brig Claus Spreckels, was fully 
covered by insurance. 

Doctor; Did you say to your husband, Mrs. Hendricks, that, if 
agreeable to him, I would send bill for services rendered during his 
recent severe illness? Mrs. Hendricks: Yes, doctor; and he thought 
you had better wait until he gets a little stronger. —Life. 

A music-dealer says that the violin has not improved any since 
1720. The same may be said of the violin-player who lives next door. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Agents for Growers and Manufacturers, 

Charterers of Vessels for All Trades, 

Agents for the Mexican Phosphate and Sulphur Co.'s 
Products, 

And General Insurance Agents, 
Have correspondents in the chief Cities of the United States, Eu- 
rope, Australia, India, China and principal Islands of the Pacific, 
and attend to the Purchase of Goods and the Sale of California 
Products in those Countries. f Jan. 22. 

Wm. T. Coleman & Co., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NEW YORK, 



Chicago: 
91 HICHICAS AVENUE, 

T.B.MCGOVEBN, 

Agent. 

New York City, 

71 Hudson Street. 



—AGENCIES— 

London: 

4 Bishopsgate St. Within, 

EdgeneE. Jones, 

Agent. 

Liverpool, 
54 Drury Buildings. 



Astoria: 

Flavel's Wharf & Warehouse, 

Jno. F. McGovern, 

Agent. 

Los Angeles, 

75 North Spring St. 



We have our Brokers in every commercial city of importance in the West- 
ern, Middle and Eastern States, and employ a large staff of traveling sales- 
men. We have the best facilities for the distribution of California Products 
East, and give especial attention to 

Canned Goods, Raisins, Wines and Brandies, 
Borax, Barley, Canned Salmon, 

Salmon in Barrels, Mustard Seed, 

Dried Fruits, Oranges, Lemons, 
Lima and Small White Beans and Other Products. 

[Feb. 26.1 

H. B Williams. A. Chesebrodgh. W. H. Dimond 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
any, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of 
Uppers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 



CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 

[Feb. 19.] 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 67, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet First and Second, San Francisco One Block Irom Palace Hotel. 

Bt^ Carriages aud Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Jcepc at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY" 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

JJl^-Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

The " Standard" Machine- Loaded Shofaun Cartridges, under the 

Cham ber fin Paten ts. 

C. WOOLRICH, 

Commission and Forwarding Agent, Mazatlan, Mexico. 

Agent for Pacific Mail S. S. Co., Royal Mail S. P. Co., The Marine Insurance 
Co. and Lloyds of Loudon. 

A residence of 34 years on the west coast of Mexico enables me to offer 
useful services and large experience to intending investors and owners of 
properties for the purchase and sales of mines, lauds, etc., in Siualoa aud 
adjoiuiug States. 

Merchandise and machinery forwarded to the interior and all commission 
business transacted with care aud punctuality. lOct. 15. 



S. L. Jones. 



E. D. Jones. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. | January 9. 



Jan. 28, 188S. 



BAH FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



L9 



NOTABIL1A. 



GREAT SCIS^ 
Jennie ilghed, and Robin tolxed he* 

Pretty little LrembliiiK Imud; 
Tlu-n with outstretched nruiM be ■queued her 

Ball reluctant form and 

• me!" but be rtanpc*. bw tighter, 
"Jennie, say, wilt tbou be mine?" 
Then her bright face grew much blighter, 
And she whispered, " 1 aui thine." 

Then thaj clasped each other fondly, 

» Jose together aa i wo bricka, 
Then they kissed each other roundly, 

And ' I left them in that ii\. 



Ex. 



What's the use of growling at the winter, young fellow? Sixty 
yean hence you will be telltug dudes with no hair on tin* top of their 
heads about the glorious winters we had in the olden times; the 
times when people who wanted a delicious breakfast, lunch, dinner 
or rapper, always wenl to the Original "Swain's Bakery," No. 218 
Butter street, and invariably got what they were after. 

A sullen-looking man with a horsewhip entered a Nebraska news- 
paper office and asked the boy where the editor was. The boy 
"aised him up" and answered: "Gune to Ohio; won't be bach For 
six months." "Where's the foreman?" "He's gone to Washing- 
ton with an invitation to the President. Won't be back 'fore cold 
weather. What do you want- -want to paralyse 'em ? " " No, no ; I 
owe $4 and thought I'd pay up." "That sol Hold on a second; 
perhaps the editor hasn't started yet." He whistled; a long, dark 
form crawled out of a wood-box, and tbe editor Was ready for busi- 
ness. — Nebraska Slate Journal, 

An exchange has discovered that woman is very appropriately 
tailed tbe " tender sex." Man is the locomotive — strong and noisy, 
but it is the tender meekly following in the rear that carries the coal 
and water, and remark- iii an audible voice that gentlemen who 
wish to present the appearance of being perfectly dressed should go 
to White, No. 61 i Commercial street, for their hats. 

Young Husband— "Clara, my dear, I wish that in sending in no- 
tices ol your luncheons to the Sunday papers you would not apeak of 
yourself as Mrs. floury Hustler, nee van der l'oel. 1 don't like it. 
Her husband's name should be sufficient for a wife." Young Wife 
(meekly) "Well, Henry, how shall 1 put it?" "Oh, say: 'Mrs. 
Henry Hustler, wife of thai enterprising and successful real estate 
man. Henry Hustler, whose beautiful residence addition is now up- 
on the market." — Kansas City Times, 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately 
after returning from a picnic excursion, and the dreau eruption will 
be prevented. James <;. Steele & Co.. 035 Market street. 

Robinson — How did Dasher get along with his California land 
speculation? Jones— oh. tirst-rate. lie bought a ranch near Los 
Angeles for twenty thousand dollars and sold it next day for ten 
thousand dollars. Robinson— "Well, I don't call that doing first-rate. 
Jones— Oh, you don't know Dasher. He's a Napoleon, he is. He 
bought i.Hi thirty days' credit and sold for cash and got out of the 
country before they got on to his methods. ■ — Detroit Free Press. 

" I don't see why you should sneer at my engagement ring," said 
tbe fair girl, with a rfush of indignation on her cheek, as she faced 
tbe belle ot the opposition town; " it's a great deal prettier than the 
One you wore three years ago, and haven't worn since!" "No, 
dear," replied her friend, with a cool far-away look in her voice; 
" not prettier, but quite as pretty. It is the same ring." —Puck. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trademark— star within a shield.. 

Superintendent Sullivan is perpetrating the first pun upon the 
year that we have heard. He asks: "Why is this year longer than 
most years?" You give it up, of course. Then he answers: " Be- 
cause'it is one and three eights (1 and 888)." This is simply dreadful! 

— Alameda Argus. 

Fredericksburg Brewing Co. Gold Medal, 1887. First Prize 
Medal 1885 and 1886. 

Dr. Gould has discovered a "winking sun" resembling in the 
rapidity of its changes the famous Algol, which the Arabs regarded 
as a sort of demon in tbe sky. Prof. Proctor advances the hypothe- 
sis that this new winking sun is Mr. Dana's captivating method to 
mash the Democratic party. 

H. "W. Patrick, Teacher of tbe Piano, N. E. Cor. Taylor and Turk. 

Miss Waldo (of Boston): Are you an admirer of Emerson, Mr. 
Wabash? Mr. Wabash (of Chicago): Oh, yes,' Miss Waldo, I never 
failed to see him when he came to Chicago. Poor Billy, be was a 
very funny man. — New York Sun. 

The man who will decide a question by the toss of a penny is usually a 
very ilippant being, but if he gets his clothes made at J. w. Carmany's 
Tailoring Establishment, No. 25 Kearny street, he will have a fine fit. 



If you want to put your sweetheart in a good humor, take her to Mora- 
Chan's Parlors, Nos. 68 and G9 California Market, and tr^at her to some of 
those delicious Balkan Frozen Oysters. 



Fob weighs that are dark commend us to coal scales, but for a cosmetic 
which really preserves the complexion give us Madame Rachel's Bloom o J 
Youth. 



WILSHIRE SAFE UND SCALE COMPANY. 



204 AND 200 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



San Francisco. 



Carry A'ullll fSAKBaofall kln.U. Kir.- it..., I. Burglar Proof, Mre 

mi, I Burglar IT,.,,!. Vault.. Vnull I I llmik 

Lock, tto are prepared i,, ,|,, all U. id. ol Look and Safe Expert Work In 

a thorough am rHiai.1,- ma r Wi al»« oarri a full -k 

lesor Ipllon. of a capacity from >,,. 

, l'r»ii;'li II ea al Lo« knitvlva. San hi. .-.,. Portland, Oregon, ud Hooo 

lull), II. I . whore . H.1..IIUT. tull nn. I everylhluit In our line, im ■ludluit 
Alarm Money Till* ami Sl„re .11..I M 



]J«n 28. 



SAFES MOVED. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher SlUcr Mining Company. 
Phe Regular Annual Meeting • >( the Stockholder* ..( the Bolcher stiver 

Mining Company will be held .11 Ilceol Iho Uompanj 

::j. Pine atre it San Fraud , California, on 

Tuesday, the 3 1 St day ol January. 1 888. at the hour of I o'clock P. M.. 

Fortbepuri iol electing a It.nir.i .,[ Directors to nerve for the ensuing 

year, and tho transaction of such other business as ma] come before the 
meetlug. Trausfcr booka will clone on Saturday, January 281b 181 

JOHN CROI kk 11, Becretarj 
I, Sun Kniucl.M'.i. Cal. [Jan. 'Jl. 



o'clock m 
Office— Koom 8. No. 327 Pine Btr 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular auaual meeting ..f the stockholders of the Dtah Consolidated 
Minim; Company, for the etectloa ol n Board of Trustees <>r Directors to 
serve for the ensuing year, and fur the transaction <>f Biiofa other business 

as may enine hefnre the meeting, will he held nu 

Wednesday, January 25, 1888, at half-past one o'clock in the afternoon. 
At the otheu of the Company, n> No. 23, Nevada Block, N<>. 309 UontgOtn 

ery btroet, Sau Francisco, Cal. Traasfer books will close on Saturday 
January II, 1888, at 12 o'clock M. 
Jan. M.] A. H. FISH, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The Ret 
Silver Mil 
No. 82V Pit 



Manhattan Silver Mining Company. 
Annual Meeting <>f the Stockholders of the Manhattan 
unpany will be held at the office of the Company, room 8, 
et, Sau Francisco, California, on 
Wednesday, the t st day of February, 1 888, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
For the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the trausactloa of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer Books will close ou Monday, Tauuaiv 80th, at 3 o'cloek 
p. m. JOHN CROCKETT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. :t27 Piue Street, Sau Francisco, California. [Jan" 21. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Eureka Consolidated Mining Company, 

San FRANCISCO, January 17, I88S. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors, held this day, at the office of the 
above Company, 301 Pine street, Sau Fra.uclsoo, a dividend (No. 81) of 
twenty-five cents (25c.) per share was declared upon the capita] stock of the 

above Company, payable on FRIDAY, February 3d, 1888. Transfer I k* 

will be closed Saturday, January 2m, 1888, tit 12 M. 

ii. u. P. BUTTON, Secretary. 

Note.— Dividend ou stock Issued In New York -Dice May 1, 1884, payable 
at the office of C. E. Laidlaw, H Wall street. New fork. [Jan. 21. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the North Belle Isle Mining Company, 

San Francisco, January 16, 1888. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
held this day, dividend No. 3 of fifty (50) cents per share was declared, 
payable THURSDAY, February 2, 1888. Transfer books will close on Thurs- 
day, January 26, 1888, at 3 o'clock P. U. . J. W. PEW. Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Piue street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 21. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending December 81. 1887. the Board of Directors of 
The German Savings and Loan Society has declared a Dividend at the 
rate of four and one-half (-.'a) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and 
three and three-fourths {?.%) per cent, per annum mi ordinary deposits, aud 
payable on aud after TUESDAY, the 3d 'lay of January, 1888. 

Dee. 31. J B>' order. GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 

Northwest Corner Powell and Eddy Streets. 

For the balf year ending December 31, 1887, a dividend bns been declared 

at the rate ot four aud one-halt (1> 2 ) Jier cent, yier a im on Term Deposits, 

aud three and three-fourths (:t?i) per rent, per annum on ordinary I'e- 
posits free of taxes, payable on and after TUESDAY, January 3, 1888. 
Dec.' 31 1 VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San FbaNCIBCO, January 4, 1888. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held ibis 

day a dividend has been declared al the rate of 3% per cent, per annum on 

all deposits for the six month.- ending December 31, 1887, free of all tuxes, 

and navable from and after this date. 

Jan. 7.1 ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Sold at price of Imported Cham- 
pagnes, less duty. 



Eclipse Extra Dry | 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 



The Nervous Origin of Colds.— Whenever, 
owing to any derangement of the nervous sys- 
tem, the perfect maintenance of animal heat 
fails to be carried out, disorder ensues, the 
mildest form of which is a catarrh, name- 
ly, the blocking up of the skin or outer surface 
of the body, with the consequent transference 
of the excfetinn to the mucous of inner sur- 
face. The deleterious matter which ought to 
have been removed by the skin, irritates the 
blood by its retention there, and ultimately 
expends itself by the nose and throat. For 
example, if the nervous system be feeble, 
sweating would probably be induced, and a 
consequent loss of heat", irrespective of the 
needs of the body ; in which case a cold would 
most probably follow. As a fact, there are 
many people with feeble nerves who readily 
perspire in the coldest weather, and are in 
consequence liable to frequently recurring 
colds. The nervous origin of colds also fur- 
nishes us with a clue to its treatment in the 
early stages. The whole history of a cold 
shows it to be essentially and primarily a state 
of collapse, demanding early recourse to a 
stimulating plan of treatment. There is no 
more dejected mortal than a patient in the 
first stage of cold, and both his physical and 
mental condition point to nervous collapse. 
Hence we believe the great success of camphor 
and ammonia inhalations in the early stage. 
It has also been repeatedly found that two 
or three glasses of wine have cut a cold short, 
when taken at the first appearance of the 
sj'mptoms. — Chamber's Journal. 

Loss of Power on Cable Roads.— According 
to a recent test made on the Chicago City 
Railway, it was ascertained that about 36 per 
cent, of the gross power used in running that 
road was required to move the empty cable. 
Figures were made on a day of heavy traffic, 
and were as follows: 1,022 horse-power were 
used to move 300 cars, only 360 of which was 
required to draw the empty cable. The cars 
were heavily loaded, perhaps 20 per cent, more 
than usual, and Secretary Windsor, to whom 
we are indebted for these facts, assures us that 
the amount of power required to haul the cable 
will not exceed 40 per cent, on the average. 

Boxing the Ears of Children.— Science pub- 
lishes some valuable records, collected by Dr. 
Samuel Sexton, on the effects of boxing the 
ears. In fifty-one cases upon his records the 
ear has been injured by blows of the open 
hand or fist. One had inflammation of the 
ear, and a running of the ear for twelve years. 
This patient died of brain disease. In another 
case the ear became inflamed and the hearing 
much impaired. In another the patient was 
slapped by his father on the left ear, and deaf- 
ness ensued, with a bloody discharge, from 
which he was three months in recovering. 



A Million Boxes A Year. 



Brandreth's Pills purify the Blood, stim- 
ulate the Liver, strengthen the Kidneys, 
regulate the Bowels. They were introduced 
in the United States in 1835. Since that time 
over fifty millions of boxes of Brandreth's 
Pills have been consumed. 

This, together with thousands of convincing 
testimonials from all parts of the world, is 
positive evidence of their value. 

Brandreth's Pills are purely vegetable, 
absolutely harmless, and safe to take at any 
time. 

Sold in every drug and medicine store, 
either plain or sugar-coated. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains Leave, and are Due to Arrive at, 

SAN FRANCISCO: 



LEAVE 

(for) 



8:00 a 

4:00 p. 

8:00 a. 

3:30 

9:30 a. 
10:30 a. 

5:30 p. 
•6:00 a. 
12:00 m. 

8:00 a. 

4:00 p. 
*4:30p. 

7:30 a. 

3:30 p. 
+3:30 p. 

7:00 a. 

5:00 p. 

8:00 a. 

8:00 a. 

7:00 a. 

8:00 a. 

8:00 a. 

5:00 p. 

4:00 p. 

6:30 p. 
•1:00 p. 

8:00 a. 
110:30 a. 
12:00 m. 

3:30 p. 
•4:30 p. 

3:30 p. 

8:00 a. 

3:30 p. 

6:30 p. 



From January 1, 1888. 



.Calistoga and Napa 



. .Colfax via Livermore 

. . Gait via Martinez . 

c. Haywards and Niles c 



c.Haywards. 



..lone via Livermore 

. . Knight's Landing 

-Livermore and Pleasanton. . 
. L'sAngl's.Deming.ElPasoAEast 

. .Los Angeles and Mojave 

..Milton 

. .Ogden and East 

. .Ogden and East 

. -Red Bluff via Marysville. . . . 

. Redding via Willows 

- -Sacramento via Beuicia 

" via Benicia 

" via Livermore. . 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia 

. . Sacramento River Steamers . 
-.San Jose 



c. 



. Santa Barbara 

.Stockton via Livermore. 

" via Martinez 

■ Siskiyou and Portland. - 



ARRIVE 

(from) 



10:10 a. 

6:10 p. 

5:40 p. 
11:10 a. 
12:40 p. 

3:40 p. 

8:40 P. 
*S:10a. 

2:40 p. 

5:40 p. 
10:10 A. 
•8:40 a. 

6:40 P. 
11:10 a. 
•5:40 p. 

8:10 A. 
10:40 a. 

5:40 p. 

6:10 p. 

8:10 a. 

6:10 p. 

5:40 p. 
10:40 a. 
10:10 a. 

7:40 a. 
«6:00a. 
•3:40 p. 
J3:40 p. 

8:40 p. 

9:40 a. 



11:10 a. 

5:40 p. 
11:10 a. 

7:40 a. 



p. for Afternoon. 
fSaturdays excepted. 



A. for Morning. 

♦Sundays excepted. 
JSuudays only. 

c — Take ferry train and change ears at East Oak- 
land. 



Standard Time furnished by LICK OBSERVA- 
TORY. 



A. N. TOWNE, 
Gen. Manager. 



T. H. GOODMAN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt, 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS, 
From "SAM FRANCISCO," Daily. 

To EAST OAKLAND— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To 230 AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— Same as " To 
East Oakland " until 6:00 p. m., inclusive, also 
at 7:00, 8:00 and 10:00 p. M. 

To FRUIT V ALE— *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 
3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *9:30, »2:00, 6:30, 
12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, »7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30, 10:00, [10:30, 11:00, Jll:30, 12:00, (12:30, 
1:00, tl:30, 2:00, (2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00,5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To BERKELEY— *6:00, "6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 
9:00, 9:30,10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 111:30, 12:00,112:30, 
1:00, 11:30, 2:00, 12:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, 12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— Same as " To Berkeley. 



To "SAN FRANCISCO," Daily. 

From FRUIT VALE— 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 8:50, 9:20, 
•10:19, *2:49, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 6:20,6:50, 8:50, 
10:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *5:21, 5:51, 
19:15, «2:38, "3:15. 

From 23d AVENUE, EAST OAKLAND— 6:55, 7:25, 
7:55,8:25,8:55, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25,10:55, 11:25, 11:55, 
12:25, 12:55, 1:25, 1:55, 2:25, 2:55. 3:25, 3:55, 4:25, 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 10:53. 

From EAST OAKLAND— »5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland— 7 minutes later 
than from East Oakland. 

From ALAMEDA— *5:25, 5:55, *6:25, 6:55, *7:25, 7:55 
«8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, U0:25, 10:5.5, 111:25, 11:55, 
112:25,12:55, Jl:25, 1:55. 12:25, 2:55,3:25, 3:55,4:2.5 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 

FROM BERKELEY'— *5:25, 5:55, *6:26, 6:55, *7:25, 
7:55, »8:25, 8:55, 9:25, 9:55, J10:25, 10:55, 111:25, 11:55, 
112:25, 12:55, 11:25, 1:55, 12:25, 2:55, 3:25, 3:^5, 4:25, 
4:55, 5:25, 5:55, 6:25, 6:55, 7:55, 8:55, 9:55, 10:55. 



From WEST BERKELEY- 
KBLEY." 



-Same as "From Ber- 



Creek Ronte. 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15,3:15, 

5:15. 
From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15 



•Sundays excepted. 



1 Sundays only. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. 

South Pacific Coast Railway Division, 

Passenger Trains Leave Station Foot of Market 
Street, South Side, at: 

A-nn A - "■ (SUNDAYS ONLY) — Hunters' 
^ ,uu Train to SAN JOSE, stopping at all 
way stations— returning, arrive in San Francisco 
at 7 :20 p. m. 

QHR a. m. daily— For Alvarado, Newark, Cen- 
*-* *- L <--' treville, Alviso, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, 
Los Gatos, Wright's, Glenwoo'd, Felton, Boulder 
Creek, Big Trees, SANTA CRUZ and all way sta- 
tions. 

O-IR P- M. (except Sunday), Express— Mt. 
^-i.j.t^ Eden, Alvarado, Newark, Centerville, 
Alviso, Agnew's, Santa Clara, SAN JOSE, New 
Almaden, Los Gatos, and all stations to SANTA 
CRUZ and Boulder Creek. 

A •-! R p. m. daily— For SAN JOSE, Los Gatos 
^ • XKLf and intermediate points. 
CCR EXCURSIONS to SANTA CRUZ and 
^P^ BOULDER CREEK, on SATURDAYS and 
SUNDAYS, to return on MONDAY, inclusive. 

$1.75 to SANTA CLARA and SAN JOSE and re- 
turn. Sundays only. 

LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 

From. San Francisco to Oakland and Alameda, 

Daily: 

$6:15— $6:45— $7:15— 7:45— 8:15— 8:45 — 9:15— 9:4. r >— 

10:15— 10:45— 11:15— 11:45 A. M— 12:15— 12:45— 1:15— 

1 :45— 2 :15— 2 :45— 3 :15— 3 :45— 1 :15— i :45— 5 :15— 5 :45 — 

6:15—6:45—7:30—8:30-9:30—10:30—11:30 F. M. 

To San Francisco, Daily: 

From FOURTEENTH and FRANKLIN Streets, 
OAKLAND : $.5:45— $6:15— $6:45— 7:15— 7:45— 8:15— 
8:45-9:15-9:45-10:15- 10:45-11:15-11:45 a.m. 12:15- 
12 :45— 1 :15— 1 :45— 2 :15— 2 :45— 3 :15— 3 :45— 4 :15— 4 :45— 
5 :15-5 :45-6 ;15— 6 :45— 7 :30-8 :30-9 :30-10 :30--ll :30 P.M. 
To San Francisco, Daily: 

From HIGH STREET, ALAMEDA— $5:31— $6:01— 
$6 :31-7 :01-7 :31-8 :01-8 :31— 9 :01— 9 :31— 10 :01— 10:31- 
11:01—11:31 A. M. 12:01—12:31 — 1:01—1:31—2:01— 
2 :31— 3 :01— 3 :31— 4 :01— 4 :31— 5 :01— 5 :31— 6 :01— 6 :31— 
7:16—8:16—9:16—10:16—11:16 p. M. 

^Sundays excepted. 

Ticket Offices, 613 MARKET STREET, under 
and Hotel, and Rotunda Baldwin Hotel, San 
ancisco. 

L, FILLMORE, W. T. FITZGERALD, 

Superintendent. G. F. and P. Agt. 

S. P. C. R'y Div. S. P. C. R'y Div. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 
S. S. San Blas. Saturday, February 4th, at 4 p. m. 
Taking Freight and Passengers direct for 
Mnzatlan, Acajutla, 

Acopulco, La Libertad, 

Champerico, Corinto, 

Sail Jose de Guatamala, Puuta Arenas, 
And Panama. 
Passengers booked through to and from Europe 
by auy line. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City op New York February llth, at 2 p. m. 

City of Peking March 3d, at 2 p. m. 

City of Sydney March 24th, at 2 p. m. 

City of Rio de Janeiro April 12th, at 2 p. m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Branuan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents, 
Geo. H. Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 28. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 2 o'clock p. m., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. — 18S8.— From San Francisco. 

(Touching at Honolulu). 

Oceanic Wednesday, Jan. 11, 1888 

Gaelic Wednesday, Feb. l, " 

Belgic Tuesday, Feb. 21, " 

San Pablo Tuesday, Mar. 13, " 

Oceanic Tuesday, April 3, " 

Gaelic Saturday, April 21, " 

Belgic Saturday*. May 12, " 

San Pablo Saturday, June 2, " 

Oceanic Thursday-, June 21, " 

Bound Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. F. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street, Union Block, San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 

G. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. f Jan. 7. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



WORLD. FLESH AND DEVIL. 

[nteltoctotl progrw Iraea at- 
tended with Strang* manifestations. A young 
lady ii] the <'it\ oi Mexico, Sefiorita Matilda 
Montaga, having been tin- iir-t of her sei t.> 

bersell to medical studies, Lhi 
men oi the city were struck with such a.imir.i- 
UoD "t her courage thai thej gol up h bull- 
fight in her honor lately. It was a real fight, 
as the fact that twoof tlie torero were serious- 
ly hart proved. The receipts were dei 
the purchase oi books and instruments for the 
outht ■■! the lady, 

The death is announced <>t M. Plana t, 

better known a- Harcellin, who may be re- 

farded a-- the originator of the society journal. 
ie founded / ' in L862, with 

the aid of tin- brilliant ^mup of men who, af- 
ter graduating in the Ecole Sormale, either 
clustered round Prince Napoleon ami the 
Princess Clotilde, or intrigued in * l rleimi-.t sa- 
lons against tin- Empire, to go over t.> it later. 
Edmond About, Tome ami Prgvosl Paradol 
were of the number. 

The liiverpooUourii'i/ oft 'omm&me states 

that oi f the most startling and imi 

inventions of the day with regard to thepro- 
pelling of steam vessels is now under consiaer- 
ation. Should it prove successful ami meet 
the expectations oi the inventors it will entire- 
lv revolutionise the whole of the steamer ser- 
vice of this country. We understand thai one 
eminent firm of engineers have offered ?o<hi,i.kh.i 
for the patent. 

The British soldier in Egypt might, 

slightly parodying the declaration of the 
crook-backed, but withal valorous, Richard 
III., truthfully exclaim, "There be six Oeman 
Dignas in the field, for five have we already 
slain instead of him." His death has been re- 
ported at least a round half-dozen times, but 
still the Snudan warrior cojues up frowning. 

— Ladies of rank continue to enter the 
world of commerce in England. Lady August- 
us Loftus, With another lady, is now manufac- 
turing scents from old-fashioned recipes pre- 
served in the family archives. Some samples 
of these perfumes having lately met with high 
favor at sales. it is probaulethat they will SOOD 
compete in the perfumery market. 

One of the last survivors of Napoleon's 

wars, Count Farinole, has just died at Bastia. 
in his fHith year. The deceased, who, like the 
great Emperor, was a Corsicau, was an officer 
of the Legion of Honor, a medalist of Saint 
Helena, and knight of the most ancient and 
celebrated Order of Saint Louis, extinct since 
1830. 

— At a meeting the other day at a home 
for aged and infirm colored persons in Phila- 
delphia, the Reverend John Gibson, a colored 
man who is 117 years of age, opened the pro- 
ceedings. Mr. Uibson was born in Virginia 
in 1771. He has been totally blind for a num- 
ber of years, but his hearing is good. 

I have sometimes thought that we can- 
not know any man thoronghlv well while he 
is in perfect health. As the ebb tide discloses 
the real lines of the shore and the bed of the 
sea, so feebleness, sickness and pain bring out 
the real character of a man. —Garfield. 

— They are as badly used in Buenos Ay res 
by the butchers as we are in this benighted 
country. Although cattle sells there at $3 a 
head, rjeef is sold retail at twenty-five to thirty- 
three cents per pound. Of course, butchers 
form a " ring" there as elsewhere. 

— The King of the Belgians has recently 
insured his own private property in the Royal 
Palaces in Brussels and at Laeken for $l,7o0,- 
000. This property consists of furniture, pic- 
tures, plate, objects of art and china. 

No fewer than 250,000 Christmas trees 

were sold in Berlin during the last season, 
They come principally from the Hartz and 
Thuringia, and the most costly tree is the sil- 
ver fir, while the cheapest is the pine. 

Sir Thomas Fermor-Hesketh is build- 
ing a large steam yacht at Swansea, which is 
to De engined at Dartmouth. 

There are said to be more millionaires 

in Buenos Ayres than in any other city of its 
size in the world. 

An artificial eye seldom lasts more than 

five years, the secretion of the glands turning 
it cloudy. 




TIME SCHEDULE. 

P&sseuger Trains leave and arrive at Passenger 
Depot (TowttMUd -i., bet 8d mill it h gtreel 
Francisco: 



L1AV1 i 

1J 01 ]-.!< 



IN BFFBOT -IAN. 1, L86& 
Cemetery tuul San Mateo 



; i -i ;io r. 



t7:O0*. 
8:30 a. 
10:30 a. 

4:30 p. 

•5:10 p. 

6:30 P. 

1 1 1 .4.-. Y. 






.San Mnter> Redwood 
and Meido 1'ark 



6:40 a. 

•8:00 a. 

9:03 a. 

♦10:02 A. 

tssor-. 

4 :86 i-. 
6:40 p. 

11 :a) p. 



. .Santa Clara, San Jose aud 
— Principal Way Stations 



jf 



10:02a. 
4:36 p. 
6:40 p. 



10:30 a. |< Almaden ami Way Stations !■! 4:36p. 



'8:80 p. I 



Gilroy, Pajaro.Castrovllle.-j i*10:02a. 
. Salinas ami Monterey I I 0:40 p. 



S :30 a. I 
■3:30 p. I 



.Holllsteraud TresPlnos. 



8:80 A.l 
"3:30 p. I 



Watsonviile, Aptos. Soquel 
. (Capitola) and Santa Cruz 



i-10:02A. 
! -hwop. 
1*10:02*. 
I G:40p. 



8:80 a. 



.Soledad, Pasn Robles, 



^Templetou (San Luis Ooispo)[ 
aud Way Stations ... J 



a. — Morning. 
•Sundays excepted 
Tratu Saturdays only. 
Trains ruu on Pacific Standard Time 



p. — Afteruoou. 
t Sundays ouly. J Theatre 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 8:30 
.. M. Train. 



Nearly all rail line to SAN LUIS OBISPO. Only 
24 miles staging between Templeton aud Sau Luis 
Obispo. Time from Sau Francisco, 12 hours. 

Through rate, t8.'i0. 



SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.— At Reduced 
Rates— to Gilroy Springs and Paraiso Springs. 



Excursion Tickets. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— Round Trip Tickets to the 

famous Lick Observatory (Mt. Hamilton), can be 

obtained at any of the Company's. Ticket Offices 

in Sau Francisco. Rate — $5.50. 

,„,,,„.j„, „„,„ (Sold Sunday Morning; good 
ror Sundays oulj, j, or Returu same da „ 

,„ q„.,,,.j _ f Sold Saturday and Sunday 

lundav y andi oul >' : E° od for ReturD until to1 - 
a l lowing Monday, inclusive, at 

the following rates : 



Monday. 



"Round Trip <... . Sat to Round Trip 

from San ij^t Mou from San 
Francisco to Tkt. Francisco to 



San Bruno .. t $ 50 

Millbrae 1 65 

Oak Grove ..1 90 

San Mateo... 75 I 10 

Belmont I 1 00, 1 25 

Redwood... | 1 001 1 40 



Fair Oaks. ..| 1 25 
Menlo Park. : 1 25 
Mayfield. . 1 25 
Mouut'n V'wll 50 



1 50 
1 60 
1 75 
12 00 



Lawrences . . 
Santa Clara.. 
Sau Jose. . . . 

Gilroy 

Hollister ... 

Aptos 

Loma Prieta. 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz. . 
Monterey.. 



Sim 
Tkt. 



Sat to 
Mou 
Tkt. 



1 50 2 25 
1 75 

1 75 

2 75 



4 00 

4 50 

5 00 

5 66 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES.— Passenger Depot, Townsend 
Street; Valencia-street Station, No. 613 Market St., 
Grand Hotel and Rotunda, Baldwin Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt Ag't 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: THE STEAM- 
ERS UMATILLA AND MEXICO— 

For VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND 
PORTS — 9 A. M. every Friday. 

The steamer MEXICO, sailing every other Fri- 
day, connects at Port Townsend with Steamers 
IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO.: Every Ave days. 

For SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, SAN 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hue- 
neme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, a. m. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA AND HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay: CITY' OF CHESTER, Every Tuesday 
at 9 o'clock a. M. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, ETC.: Ev- 
ery Monday, at 3 p. M. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents 

Sept. 17.] No. 10 Market street. 



UfADI/IOKALL. 850 A WEEK and 
W I I K K expenses paid. Outfit worth 85 and 
" VIIIV particulars free. P. O. Vlckery, 

Augusta, Me. [Oct. 15. 




1HE DONAHUE BROAD GAUGE ROUTE. 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1887, and 

until further notice, Boati and TraJm will 

leave from and arrive at Ban Knuin • 
senk'or Depot, MAKKETSTKEET W1IAKF, as 
follows: 

Arrive in - 



Lea VI s. p. 



gj* jsuuday, 



In>TiNATl(iN. 



Bun**. *::>• 



7 r> v. ii, 8:00 a. m. 

3:110 P.M. 5:011 p. M. 

jflOr.K.I 



7:45 a. m.|8 :00 a. M 
3:30 p.m. 



Petaluma 
aud 

Santa Rosa. 

Pulton 

Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Cloverdale A 
Way stations. 



10:40 a.m 
6:10p.M 



8:65 k m. 

A.M 

6:06 p. M. 



7:45 A.M. '8:00 A.M. Guerueville. 0:10 p. > 



1. II.!'. M 



Stages connect hi Santa Kosa for White Sulphur 
Bprings, Setiast.ii.nl and Mark West Springs: at 
Claimlle fur Skaggfl Springs, and at Cloverdale 
for Highlaud s^riu^s, Kelseyvllle, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Springs, Bine Lakes, Bartlett 
Springs, Ukiah, Vichy Springs, Navarro Ridge, 
Meudocino City and the Gevsers. 



EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, |1 75; to Sauta Rosa, »3; to 
Healdsburg, |4 ; to Cloverdale, 15. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sundays only— 
To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, 82; to Healds- 
burg, *3; to Cloverdale, »4 50; to Guerueville, 88. 



From Sau Francisco to Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:45 a. m., 9:15 a. m., 11:30 a.m., 
3:30 p.m., 5:00 p. M. ,6:1b p.m.; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 
9:30 a. m., 11:00 a. m., 1:30 p. m., 5:00 p. m. 

To Sau Fraucisco Irom San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20 a. m., 8:00 a. m., 9 :30 a.m., 12 45 P.M., 3:40 p. M., 
5:05 p. m. ; Suudays: 8:10 a. m., 9:40 a. m., 12:15 P. M., 
3:30 P.M., 6:00 P. M. 

To Sau Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50 A. M., 8:25 a. m., 9:55 A. M., 1:10 p. M., 
4:05 p. M., 5:33 p. m. ; Sundays: 8:40 A. M., 10:05 A. M., 
12:40 p. M., 3:55 p. M., 6:30 p. M. 



H.C. WHITING, 

Superintendent. 



PETER J. MCGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



©•-TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
reel and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

Steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE Leaves San Fran- 
cisco and Connects with Trains at SONOMA 
LANDING as follows: 

4.AA' m., Daily (Sunday excepted), from 
. <-»»-> WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF, for 
the Town of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 
Returning, arrives in San Francisco at 9:00 a. m. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8.-ICS A. M. (Sundays ouly), from WASHING- 
.10 TON-STREET WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen aud Way Points. Return- 
ing, arrives in San Francisco at 0:00 p. M. Round- 
Trip Tickets to Sonoma, 81; Glen Ellen, 81 50. 



H. C. WHITING, 
Superintendent. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, aud Tkt. Agt. 



_ TICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and 2 New Montgomery Street. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Folsom 
street, 

For Honolulu: 

S. S. Australia (3,000 tons) January 31, 1888 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Zealanma Thursday, February 9th, at 10 a, m 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS& BROS., 

Jan. 28.1 General Agents. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



AUDITOR STROTHER. 

Auditor Strother is making more haste than speed in his endeavor 
to win a reputation as a watch-dog of the treasury. He keeps his eye 
upon the crumbs like a toothless old terrier, who may snarl but can- 
not bite, whilst, at the same time, he allows the loaf to disappear as 
if by magic. He has been beaten in his attempt to prevent the 
deputy County Clerks drawing the full amount of salary set apart to 
their use by law, and, as a cousequence of his failure, the city has to 
pay a pretty stiff bill of costs. The whole trouble was that County 
Clerk Ruddick, as a Republican, did not consult Bush street as to the 
deputies he should appoint. The Auditor then assailed Judge Ma- 
Kuire, and declared he would not audit the salary bills of the Judge 
for the three months during which he was stumping New York for 
Henry George. It was not just the thing, we think, for the Judge to 
spend his long vacation in that way. It he needed rest, he was en- 
titled to take it, but rest is one thing and the hard work of a stumping 
tour quite another. However, be that as it may. it is certain that the 
law was on his side. He was entitled to leave' the State for a period 
not longer than ninety days, and could legally claim his salary during 
the interval. That being clear, nothing but a desire to "get even" 
could have excited the impotent kicking by the Auditor. The milk 
in ihat cocoa nut is that Maguire is a most irreverent denouncer of 
the Boss and his lambs. But the Judge is not a good man to play 
balls with, unless you are prepared to take rubbers in return. He 
has just sprung a law upon the Auditor which has " knocked him 
higher than a kite." It appears that originally the office of Auditor 
was such a sinecure that the incumbent invariably absented himself 
from his office and neglected what little there was to do. To meet 
this condition of things an amendment to the Consolidation Act was 
passed, providing that "the Auditor shall keep a public office and 
give his personal attendance there daily during the office hours fixed 
in this act. If he absent himself from said office during such office 
nours. except on indispensable office business or urgent necessity, he 
shall lose his salary for the day, and it shall be a part of his official 
duty to keep account of the times and occasions when he shall be so 
absent from duty." As Strother likes a vacation, is fond of junket- 
ing trips, and has been frequently absent from his office without 
complying with the law, he is now at the mercy of his enemies. 

THE CRIMINAL ELEMENTS IN CONTROL. 
The Boss has called upon his faithful lambs to organize, and they 
are actively engaged in obeying him. He is bent upon taking time 
by the forelock, and, as a consequence, he is already preparing for 
the great campaign which is to distinguish this year of grace. A local 
Tammany Society, an Iroquois Club, the Western Addition Invinc- 
ibles, and the Pond Democratic Club, are thus early in the field, and, 
as a matter of course, the Tigers of Telegraph Hill and the Rock- 
rollers of Tar Flat will make their appearance when and where they 
will do the most good. Of these various organizations the Pond 
Democratic Club is believed to be the most respectable. What does 
that respectability amount to? Let us see. Stuart M. Taylor, under 
a misapprehension, became a member of it, and on the list of toasts 
to be drank at a contemplated banquet, he was down to respond to 
"The President of the United States." Upon learning that fact, 
Boss Buckley declared he would not attend the banquet, and his 
lambs, with one accord, announced that if Col. Taylor spoke they 
would rise from the table and leavein a body. Thereupon the Colonel 
wrote a spirited and manly letter, in which he resigned his member- 
ship of the Club. But he was not to be allowed to go without a part- 
ing kick. It is so rare that the gang find a clean-handed and decent 
citizen in their midst that they cannot resist the temptation to insult 
him before he gets away. Colonel Taylor's resignation was not ac- 
cepted , but, on motion* he was expelled. The leader of the lambs on 
the occasion has a record worthy of himself and of them. The police 
authorities supply a most appalling list of offenses with which, be- 
tween 1877 and 1883, he was charged. More than a score of charges 
and several sentences appear against his name during that time. Yet 
this man, as a henchman of Buckley and a leader in the Pond Demo- 
cratic Club, is a power in the land. When he gives the word, no 
room must be found in the Democratic organizations of the period 
for a man of clean life and honest purpose. Just such men as he put 
up our election tickets, control our city government and run nearly 
every office under it. No wonder that juries are fixed, Judges bribed 
and justice made a mutter of bargain and sale. It is truer to-day 
than when the vigilance committee was formed, that the criminal 
elements are in control. They are so by virtue of their organizing 
capacity. The way to oust them is for honest men to organize better. 

RINGSTERS IN THE OPEN. 
The local Society of Tammany Braves met, the other night, at 
its new wigwam on Bush street, under the lead of Chief Sachem 
Newman. It was a distinguished gathering. Collector John S. Hager 
was represented by a letter, in which he "expressed gratification at 
the distinction of having been elected an honorary member of the 
society." Judge Hager's absence was regretted, but his brotherly 
words warmed the hearts of the assembled braves, and there were 
enough kindred spirits to keep up the enthusiasm of the war-dance. 
Warrior C. A. Buckley was quite competent to take charge of the 
proceedings. On motion of C. A. Buckley, D, O. Miller, of Visalia, 
was elected an active member. C. A. Buckley addressed the Chief 
Sachem in a playful speech. C. A. Buckley subsequently moved that 
all persons joining before February 1st should be considered charter 
members, it is needless to say that nothing more was necessary than 
for the great warrior to express his wishes. It may be of interest to 
remember some of the persons who joined in this Buckley celebra- 
tion. There was Judge, Regent, Collector and President-maker John 
S. Hager, by letter. There was Postmaster Wm. J. Bryan, the offi- 
cial under whose paternal care letters addressed to himself are 
tumbled into the mail bags for San Jose. There was Auditor Fleet 
F. Strother, the watch-dog of the treasury, and of the lambs of the 
fold. There were C. H. Maddox, Joseph jS T aphtaly, Dr. F. H. Dennis, 
Gen. Bamberger and a galaxy of other political luminaries. " Tam- 
many Society " is a good name. It is not a mere imitation. We al- 
ready have our indigenous Tweed. 



"PEOGBEDIEiTTTJR" 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR BOTH SEXES, 

1707 Powell Street, Between Union and Filbert. 

SPECIAL FRENCH CLASS daily, from 3:30 to 5 p. m. Courses of French 
and English on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from S to 9:30 p. m. 

Circulars giving a full history of the Institute, its objects and terms, will 
be seut to any address upon application, 

["Dec. 10. XATIER MFFRET, Director. 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. . 

Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the stockholders of the 
Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company, a corporation organized 
U ^ dCr -?, n K ,' y .T'VvS' th £> aws °< the State of California, has been called 
and will be held at the office of said corporation, 309 Montgomery street 
room 52, in the City and County of San Francisco, in said State, on 

Saturday, the 28th day of January, 1888, at the hour of 2 o'clock P. M„ 
For the purpose of considering and determining whether or not the action 
of the Board of Directors of said corporation in purchasing for said cor- 
poration that certain mining claim situated in Tuscarora Mining District 
County of Elko, State of Nevada, known as the Nina mining claim shall be 
ratified and approved by said stockholders, and for the purpose of 'consid- 
ering and determining whether the action of the Board of Directors of this 
corporation in selling to North Commonwealth Mining Compauv acornnra- i 
tion organized under the laws of the State of California, all that certain ' 
mining ground situated in Elko County, State of Nevada, described as I 
follows, to wit: ! 

All those portions of the lands embraced within the limits of Nina and ' 
All Alone mining claims, in Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, State 
of Nevada, bounded and described as follows, to wit: Beginning at post 
number three (3) as laid down and designated on the United States Survey 
of lot number forty-six (46) in township number fortv (40) north ran<4 
fifty-one (51) east, Mount Diablo base and meridian, said survey being the 
survey of the ground of the Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Companv ■ 
thence running according to the true meridian, magnetic variation beine 
seventeen and one-half ll7',i) degrees east, north thirty-one (31) decrees 
fifteen (15) minutes, east eight hundred and twenty-five (S25) feet- thence 
south thirty-three (33) degrees thirty (30) minutes, east five hundred and 
thirty (530) feet ; thence south thirty-one (31) degrees fifteen (15) minutes 
west six hundred L600) feet; thence north nftv-eight (58) degrees fortv-five 
(•lo) minutes west four hundred and fifty-eight (45S) feet; thence south 
fifty-seven (»/) degrees forty-five (45) minutes, west fifty (50) feet- thence 
north thirty-one (31) degrees fifteen (15) minutes, east forty-four (44) feet to 
the place of beginning. * ' 

And in selling to Del Monte Mining Company, a corporation organized 
under the laws of the State of California, the following described mining 
ground, to wit: All that certain mining ground situate, lying and being in 
the Tuscarora Mining District, in the Countv of Elko, State of Nevada and 
described as follows, to wit: All that portion of the laud embraced within 
the limits of the two mining claims in said district known as the Nina and 
Tip-Top claims and locations, lying north and west of the line drawn 
through post number two (2) and post number three (3), as laid down and 
designated upon United States survey of lot number fortv-six (46) in town- 
ship forty (40) north, range fifty-one (51) east, Mount Diablo base and meri- 
dian, said survey being the survey of the ground of the Commonwealth 
Consolidated Mmiug Company, shall be ratified and confirmed by the said 
stockholders, 

Dated San Francisco, January 10, 1888. 

By order of the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Consolidated 
Mining Company. [Jan. 14 ,1 • HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

FILLMORE TRACT. 

The FILLMORE TRACT, situated about THREE MILES easterly from 
San Jose, containing 

800 ACRES, 

Has been subdivided, as per map on file in our ofSce, in tracts of from 7 
to 40 Acres, and placed in our hands 

FOR SALE I 

Prices range from $100 per acre and upwards, according to location. 

TERMS— 25 per cent. Cash; 25 per cent, additional within 60 days, and 
the remainder on or before two years, at 8 per cent, per annum. 

MONTGOMERY, REA & CO., 

(INCORPORATED) 

Real Estate Agents, 

Nov. 26.] No. 7 West Santa Clara Street, San Jose. 

SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal. 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 
PIAIJTOS. [Oct. 8, 

DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL. OCCASIONS. 

J. COOPER, 
T&'BlttCJZJLliTT TAILOB. 

24 New Montgomery St, Palace Hotel Building. [Dec. 17. 



Eciipse Extra Dry I 



Atrv > Champagne, comparison will 
prove r tperiority over imported. No 
Brandy ^dded. 



Jan. 28, 1888, 



CALIFORNIA ADVBRTI8ER. 






"UNDER FULL CONTROL 
Some one has said thai it makoa ;i 
'tTi'iuT in the fores ol i sentence whether there 
be i men behind it or not. If this be true, 
end the evidences rather polnl that vraj . what 
may be the resoii when there Is not one man 
behind the sentence, but ■ hoal ol thi 
least this i> wint one Ml o! spiritualistic cranks 
claim— that a speaker may become "control- 
led by ihe spirits of those no more in the 
flesh ; that he maj ''submit himself to the 
guidance ol those who have passed over and 
are now i li** teachers and leaders of believers." 
To one not in sympathy with this ■ belief.* 1 it 
Is rather amusing t-> hear it announced thai 
■• thr control will answer Questions propounded 
by the audience." > 'tic evening, nol Ion 
■• the control," <»r. t»> be more expl 
spirits who have kindly consented I 
certain man as a mouthpiece, were letting 
themselves loose on t he subject ol spiritual- 
ism, and made some very remarkable state- 
ments in regard to theosophy, occultism and 
clairvoyance. Alter the lecture was over and 
the speaker was passing into the vestibule, a 
young lady, who had listened to "the con- 
vaporings, for the tirst time ventured 

osl him with a question which at once 

implied a correction "t a statement he had 
made in closing. " My dear young 
blandly responded the lecturer. '"' 1 do nut re- 
member anything about it. While 1 am on 
the platform 1 am under full control of the 
spirits who speak through me. I have no idea 
01 what 1 am saying." " Yuu don't ; then pray 
excuse me." And his interlocutor laughed in 
his face. She couldn't help it. 



Amid Unnatural Excitement. — Evidence 
accumulated, demonstrates beyond cavil or 
tlonbt, that unnatural excitement, whether it 

In- fear, anger, jealousy or any/tiling else, ruins 
mind and body with apoison, for which there 
is no absolute antidote. It brings ruin to the 
bod] more than any other cause, and ruin to 
the nerves and bra*in more than every other 
cause combined. The point I make, and wish 
to be remembered, is that unnatural excite- 
ment is the human soul's greatest foe. Tt 
takes the blood out of the body, the life out of 
■ ■I. and the joy out of the life. It with- 
ers the young form of symmetry and beauty 
into the bending, shapeless form'of premature 
age. It plows its furmws and insidiously and 
deeply works its wrinkles upon the face and 
brow of life's youth and prime, where naught 
but smiles should live and reign. It invades 
the temple of strength and paralyzes her fair 
garden called the brain. It dries up her 
streams from the greater to the lesser nerves. 
It cuts the sinews of her strength and changes 
the body temple into a pest house of disease, 
and rinses the drama of life's great mistake, 
as it wraps the unhappy wreck in death's 
charitable mantle of darkness and silence. 
Fight down every phase of unnatural excite- 
ment, control yourself in all things. Banish 
from your nature jealousy and hate, subdue 
your anger and every form of unnatural ex- 
citement, cultivate a sweet disposition, a cheer- 
ful nature, and spirit of love and faith. Your 
life will be one of joy, sickness will not trouble 
you, sorrow seldom visit your home, your life 
will be one of peace and joy, and your peace 
and joy will be the peace and joy of others. 
Youth" will stay with you through your prime, 
follow you far into the harbor of old age, close 
in death your lips with a smile, and linger in 
memory over your grave. 

— American Spectator. 



Submarine Lighting. — Experiments have 
been made at the torpedo station at Newport, 
to ascertain the best way of illuminating the 
body of the sea below and in the immediate 
neighborhood of a boat, and a novel use for 
the incandescent lamps has been thereby de- 
veloped. It was found that a very effective 
light could be obtained by submerging incan- 
descent lamps in the sea. Each lamp is of 100 
candle-power, provided with a water-tight fit- 
ting and connections, and mounted upon a 
pole 20 feet long, which is lowered vertically 
from the side of the vessel. By this means 
the body of the water is illuminated to a radius 
of 150 feet, though the light is not visible from 
a distance. — Industries. 

"I sawyou at the theater last night, Jack." 
"No, did you? What did you think of the 
little party with me, Gus?'" "Too much 
bustle and hat and not enough girl," said Gus, 
critically. —Puck. 



"WHAT'S KILLING US?" 

The Wonders Which tho Microscope Re- 
veata 

i»ne ol the leading scientific publ 

BtatSS that many people are now using the 

ipe t" discover the real i 
ease in the system, and to detect adulterations 
of food and medicines. 

This wonderful instrument has saved many 
a life. &. microscopical test shows, for in 
the presence of albumen. <>r the Life o 
blood, in certain derangements of the kidneys, 

hut medicine does not tell OS DOW far advanced 

the derangement is, or whether it shall prove 
fatal. 

The microscope, however, gives us this 
knowledge: 

Blight's disease, which so manv people 
dread, was not fully known until the micro- 
scope revealed its characteristics. Et greatly 
aids the physician, skilled in its use, in deter- 
mining now far disease has advanced, and' 
fi fuller idea of the true structure of the 
idney. 

A noted German scholar recently discovered: 
that bv the aid of the microscope the physician 
can tell if there is a tumor forming in tne sys- 
tem, and if certain appearances are seen*in< 
the fluids passed it is proof positive that the : 
tumor is to be a malignant one. 

If any derangement of the kidneys is de- 1 
tected by the microscope, the physician looks 
for the development of almost any disease the 
system is heir to, and any indication of Blight's 
disease, which has no symptoms of its own, 
and cannot be fully recognized except by the , 
microscope, he looks upon with alarm. 

This disease has existed for more than 2,000 
years. It is only until recently that the mi- J 
croscope has revealed to us its universal preva- 
lence and fatal character. Persons who form- 
erly died of what was called general debility, 
nervous breakdown, dropsy, paralysis, heart 
disease, rheumatism, apoplexy, etc., ar? now 
known to have really died of kidney disease, 
because, had there been no disorder of the 
kidneys, the chances are that the effects fron 
which they died would never have existed. 

As the world becomes better acquainted 
with the importance of the kidneys in the hu- 
man economy by the aid of the microscope, 
there is greater alarm spread through the 
communities concerning it, and this accounts 
for the erronious belief that it is on the in- 
crease. 

As yet neither bomeopathist norallopathist 
is prepared with a cure tor deranged kidneys, 
but the world has long since recognized, and 
many medical gentlemen also recognize and 
prescribe Warner's safe cure for these de- 
rangements, and admit that it is the only 
specific for the common and advanced forms 
of kidney disorders. 

Formerly the true cause of death was dis- 
covered after death. To-day the microscope 
shows us, in the water we pass, the dangerous 
condition of any organ in the body, thus en- 
abling us to treat it promptly and escape pre- 
mature death. 

As the microscope in the hands of laymen 
has revealed many diseases that the medical 
men were not aware of, so that preoaration, 
like many other discoveries in medicine and 
science, was found out by laymen, outside the 
medical code ; consequently it comes very 
hard for medical men to indorse and prescribe 
it. Nevertheless, Warner's safe cure contin- 
ues to grow in popularity and the evidences 
of its effectiveness are seen on every hand. 

Some persons claim that the proprietors 
should give the medical profession the formu- 
la of this remedy, if it is such a "God-send to 
humanity," and* let the physicians and public 
judge whether or not it be so recognized. 

We, however, do not blame them for not 
publishing the formula, even to get the recog- 
nition of the medical profession. The stand- 
ing of the men who manufacture this great 
remedy is equal to that of the majority of 
physicians, and the reason that some doctors 
give for not adopting and prescribing it— viz: 
that they do not know what its ingredients 
are — is absurd. 

Mr. Warner's statement— that many of the 
ingredients are expensive, and that the desire 
of the unscrupulous dealer or prescriber to 
realize a large profit from its manufacture by 
using cheap an injurious substances for those 
ingredients would jeopardize its quality and 
reputation; and that Warner's safe cure can- 
not be made in small quantities on account of 
the expensive apparatus necessary in com- 



i to iib to bo 



poondini 

a re.,-. . 

The iimvei 
neighbors, and the Indisputable evtden 
it . and it alone, han complete m i 

of the kidneys, i-< sufficient explana 
tiun of its extraordinary reputation, and con- 
clusive proof tJi.it it is, perhaps, the moal bene- 
ficial discovery known to ■hem.-, 

the all 
the organs it is di 

tO reach ahd benefit. 

THE LUCKY MAN. 

As was announced in last weeks " it a 
the sum of 15,000 was won in Beuicia at the 
last drawing of the Louaiana Mate Lottery. 
As the holder of the lucky ticket kept tin good 
news to himself, hundreds ol people hs - 
giving their leisure time in trying to ferret out 
th.- fortunate person. < hi Thursday noon Mr. 
!..('. Atwood, our City Treasurer and Man- 
ager of the Western Union Telegraph Office 
oi this place, quietly informed the astonished 
public tli at be was tin- holder of the coupon oi 
ticket 8,180, which won the prize of $100,000 
in the December drawing o! the Louisiana 

State Lottery, one twentieth part ol the ticket 

or $5,000 having been received from Wells, 
Fargo&Co.'s Express in hard twentj dollar 
gold pieces on Thursday evening. A few mo- 
ments after its arrival Mr, Atwood, accom- 
panied by Express Agent Durner, repaired to 

his home and presented the money to bis wile 
-i'. i ( hntm r gilt Ibis WiS h: r first n K 
of the happy Christmas in store for her. Both 
herself and husband have taken the matter 
very coolly. Of the many hundreds of dol- 



lars paid out in Beuicia for lottery tickets 
monthly, at last good fortune has visited the 
home of one deserving family, who thorough- 



ly appreciate the erift, and will surely make 
the best of use of it. The unanimous verdiet 
is, '* I am glad of it, as a more deserving fam- 
ily could not have been favored." The New 
\ear begins its career in this home under 
brighter and happier auspices than they could 
have dreamed for. The lucky ticket was the 
fifth one ever purchased by Mr. Atwood. 



: purchased by 
lienicin t ( W.) 



Nmd hra. Jan. 4. 



"IT IS ALMOST HUMAN. 




"The Norton" 



7 ozs. to 16 ozs., inclusive. 
MURPHY, GRANT & 



CO. 



DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy None but the Genuine— A Specific for Ex- 
hausted Vitality, PhysicalDebility.Wa.sted Forces, 
etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine.Paris, 
aud the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California 
and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 
Market street, (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. 
Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, $2; of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6. Preparatory Pills, $2. 

Send for Circular. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

The California Powder Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of The 
California Powder Works will be held at the office 
of the company, No. 230 California street, on 
MONDAY, 6th February, 1888, at twelve (L2) 
o'clock M. Transfer book will close on 1st Febru- 
ary, at noon. 

Jan. 21.) JOHN F. LOH8E, Secretary. 



DR. J. D. ARNOLD, 

THROAT, NOSE AND EAR. 

Removed from 229 Geary to 235 Post, corner 
Stockton. Hours , 11 to 12 and 1 to 4. | Jan. 21. 



Door-Check and Spring, 

Closes Doors IVilliont Slamming, 

For sale only by 
FEAHK D. MOERELI. 
224 Market street, near Front S.F 
MOUNT VERNON CO., BALTIMORE. 

*stT"" The undersigned having been appointed 
AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST for the sale 
of the manufactures of above company, have now 
in store : 

Sail Duck — all Numbers; 
Hydraulic — ail Numbers; 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete As- 
sortment of All Qualities 28J^-Inch DUCK, from 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 28, 1888. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
The not very reliable telegraphic service of the daily press an- 
nounced last week that the police and " the people" had come into 
contact in some insignificant place in Ireland over a demonstration 
in honor of the " Manchester martyrs." The incident is unworthy 
of the space it takes to relate it, "except in so far as it serves as an 
illustration to point a moral and adorn a tale. "The people" who 
engage in demonstrations in honor of the "Manchester martyrs" 
may possibly favor Home Rule; in fact, there is no room to doubt 
but that they do. But it is an error to assume from this, as many 
people do, that Home Rule and Manchester martyrdom are thesame 
thing. The " Machester martyrs " were simple, common-place mur- 
derers, and were hung for the commission of an atrocious crime. No 
self-respecting, intelligent man or woman could, therefore, join in a 
demonstration in their honor. The so-called " Manchester martyrs" 
were Fenians, and their avowed object was to achieve what they were 
pleased to term the " independence " of Ireland. In the furtherance 
of this purpose, they attacked a prison van in the streets of Man- 
chester, rescued some prisoners that were in it, and shot the police- 
man in charge of it. Naturally enomgh, people who do not go very 
deeply into things, say that those who are willing to demonstrate in 
honor of these malefactors are in sympathy with an " independent" 
Ireland — in other words, a disruption of the British Empire — and the 
fact that such people are also in favor of Home Rule, naturally leads 
to the inference that Home Rule is separation in disguise. But this 
is a mistake. The N ews Letter long since pointed out that Home 
Rule was unfortunate in its friends ; that it suffers from the approval 
of a considerable number of people who have a singular faculty of 
confounding crime with patriotism, and who, if they could only 
coherently express their wishes, would be found to desire a reversal 
of the military result of the battle of the Boyne and the civil conse- 
quences which flowed therefrom, rather than " separation." But, 
admitting all this to be true, surely a meritorious political proposal 
does not become less meritorious because some of its supporters are, 
from a moral stand-point, rather "off-color?" Of course, if the 
proposal entirely emanates from and is supported by such people, the 
case is somewhat different. 

The recent visit of Mr. Gladstone to Italy has brought this ques 
tion up in another form. In a crude, vulagar, abusive article, the 
Paris edition of the New York Herald directed Mr. Gladstone's atten- 
tion to the fact that the Italy which he is visiting is a united Italy, 
that it is contentedat home as well as respected abroad because of 
its unity, and that the achievement of that unity represented years 
upon years of patriotic labor on the part of Italian statesmen. 
Finally Mr. Gladstone was asked to contrast his own efforts to dis- 
unite his country with those of Italian patriots to unite theirs. 
The question thus raised is: -Does Home Rule mean disruption? 
Those who think so entirety misconceive the purpose which under- 
lies the proposition ; and it is possible that many of those who sup- 
Jiort the proposal, as well as many of those who oppose it, are alike 
aboring under this misconception. This is, to some extent, the 
natural result of the mistake which Mr. Gladstone made in confin- 
ing his Home Rule proposals to Ireland. In reality, however, genu- 
ine Home Rule is only another name for bringing the administration 
of the Government closer to the people. In Ireland it can be made to 
serve to placate and eliminate a certain feeling of resentment to- 
wards the sister Isle which long years of harsh and unwise Castle 
rule has built up, but in no way can it be made to lead to. separation 
or to a reopening of those unfortunate religious controversies which 
terminated in the battle of the Boyne. Instead of having a tendency 
to disunite, Home Rule should operate to substitute a real union in 
the place of the nominal one which now requires armed force for its 
maintenance. In England, in Scotland and in Wales it would bring 
nearer to every man's door-step the administering as well as the 
making of those regulations of every-day life which constitute the 
principal and most important part of municipal law. The British 
Parliament of to-day is too far away from a large proportion of the 
duties it is required to perform. It needs to be made an imperial 
body ; it needs Home Rule to relieve it of work which does not prop- 
erly belong to it. — 

Mr. O'Brien having recovered his liberty and his breeches, has been 
industriously circulating himself through Ireland, making a noise. 
Mr. O'Brien is one of the misfortunes against which Home Rule has 
to contend. He is a nasty, overbearing, vulgar, demagogic black- 
guard, who seems to have no regard for the truth. When he arro- 
gantly set forth to drive the Governor- General of Canada from his 
high office, he gave the world the true measure of his ignorant, in- 
solent conceit. The present Governnfent made a martyr of him by 
unjustly putting him in jail, and in doing so it showed the cloven 
foot of masterly incapacity. As between O'Brien and the most 
narrow-minded, overbearing official the Castle ever possessed, there 
is little room for choice. 

It is said that in the event of any future war between Russia and 
the German Powers, one of the very first steps taken by the latter 
would be the reconstitution of Poland as an independent State. This 
in some quarters is considered a very likely contingency. When 
Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812, he proclaimed the independence of 
Poland ; and with the number of revived nationalities which have 
sprung again into political life during the present century before our 
eyes, it is not at all improbable that Poland, which was once a greater 
Power than either Prussia or Russia, may yet fulfill her destiny as 
an independent State. It is hardly more than fifty years, after the 
insurrection of 1831, that the independence of Poland was thoroughly 
crushed out by the Emperor Nicholas of Russia, while Bulgaria, 
Servia and Greece have all regained their national life (after being 
submerged for nearly five centuries by the wave of Turkish conquest) 
within the limits of the present century. 

Died.— January 21st, Stephen H. Marsh, a native of Marlborough, 
England, father of GeorgeT. and. Victor Marsh, and brother of Henry 
Marsh, of this city; age, 83 years, 11 months, 17 days. Melbourne, 
Sydney (Australia) papers please copy. 



THE GUMP ART EXHIBITION. 

It is seldom that San Francisco has such an opportunity to view 
such a collection of art treasures as is now on exhibition in the Art 
Association rooms in this city. Mr. Gump, while abroad, secured the 
gems of the Paris Salon and the Munich Art Exhibition. Almost 
every variety of subject is here represented, ranging from life-size 
figures to the smallest bit of genre painting. Lords and ladies bow 
themselves through their stately relations to each other; the roister- 
ing soldier drinks bis foaming tankard of ale; children gather at 
school; flowers bloom in variety; Winter snows have fallen; the 
Norman peasant plows his fields; in brief, each picture being the 
work of an artist, is stamped with individuality, and announces its 
subject almost without reference to the catalogue. One cannot fail 
to be impressed by two features of the collection. The first, the por- 
trayal of subjects of a religious nature, such as Entering the Convent, 
by Mile. Jeanne Rougier. Artists have ever delighted in portraying 
the ceremonies and the sacraments of § church whose vestments and 
appointments permit of strong effects in color and contrast. The 
duties it imposes upon its adherents, the situations in which the latter 
may be placed in the performance of their duties, afford fine scope 
for the portrayal of the emotions, and demand a close study of human 
nature. Every countenance in the picture just mentioned is a crea- 
tion. The other noticeable feature of the collection is the great variety 
of faces seamed with years, furrowed by feeling, or scarred by crime. 
The loveless un attractiveness of old age is, in several cases, empha- 
sized by contrast with the young, fresh faces of grandchild or bloom- 
ing maidens close to the parchmenty skin of the old. This is most 
strongly brought out by the Munich artists. A fine St. Bernard, by 
our Matilda Lotz, is attracting much attention. There are several 
nude pictures in the collection. Of them suffice it to say that the 
figures are life-size, the flesh tints excellent, and that they are never 
unattended. The marble busts and bronzes also are superb. 

O-IR, J^lST ID 

CELEBRATION ! 



_MI IE 1R, O IE ID , 

ON 

Wednesday, - - - February 1, 1888, 

ON THE OCCASION OF 

TURNING THE WATER OF THE MERCED CANAL 

INTO THE 

MAMMOTH RESERVOIR, 

Which Covers 640 Acres of Land. 



The Headgate will be raised by CHARLES CROCKER, Esq., 
GOVERNOR WATERMAN and Staff, the State officers, and many 
other distinguished citizens will be present to witness the consum- 
mation of the Greatest Irrigation Enterprise in the State. Excur- 
sion Rates from all points in the State will be given. Free Trans- 
portation from the Railroad Depot at Merced to the Reservoir and 
return furnished visitors, 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION FOR BOYS 

1 ST. MATTHlW'S HALL, % 

£ SA.2ST IVC-A-TIEO, CAL. 

1 CLASSICAL SCHOOL, | 

3 Under Military Discipline. 3 

Sa Special Attention and Advantages for Fitting Boys for a Scien- ,_, 

tine or Classical Course. » 

m REV. ALFRED LEE BREWER, Principal. j§ 

TWENTY-TWO YEABS OF SUCCESSFUL WORK ! 

EASTER TERM WILL OPEN JANUARY 8th. 



Vol. XXXV III. 



t AH fRAHOl« 0o 






News iiET>TBR 

(JTalifoVnia ACibcrttsrcr. 

DfVOTtO TO THE Lc*:»*0 Istf«e<TS OF CaUFOHMA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 

M iKIOoir. 



; '-ia*n vmttt r. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1888. 



THE BUSINESS OFFICES of the 8. /•'. NEWS 
LETTER have Int a removed to Flood Buildi 
Market and Fourth Sis., when for advertisements 
•ui:l subscriptions will be received ana eommtwitcaitons 
should he addressed. Suhscrihi ivingthe NEWS 
LETTER regularly trill confer a favor «n the publisher by 
notifyin g him. 

FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



The Comstock Market lias shown an advance in prices along 
the lode generally daring the week, although as a rule the move- 
meal lias not been sustained, yel an opportunity offered to make 
1 turn in each? section ol the lode. The news from the lode 
is very scant \ , but as some important work is lined out for the 
Lture, the art ion of the stock is very carefully watched by dealers. 
In the middle mines the latest development in Sorcross running in- 
to the Bavage, or, rather, the Savage drift running into Norcross, has 
established Devond doubt that thf hndy of ore in Norcross extends 
Into Bavage. Within a short time a drift, which is now being extend- 
ed in Gould .V Carry, will connect with the Savage North line, and it 
i> hoped that in its coarse the same ore body will be encountered in 
that mine. If it does. Curry will rampse on the strength of it. It 
is a matter of comment among people on the street that a mine with 
sach a showing as Savage should hang along at low figure and in- 
active, The stock is worth more than the price quoted to-day on the 
Old showing of ore, leaving the new development out of the question 
altogether. At (the South, Alpha Seg. I'cleher and Overman, will 
shortly be the scene of important operations, which should tend to 
Strengthen prices. In the former a drift will be run on the 422 level 
in the expectation of making a connection with the ore body which was 
met with on the 322. In the latter cross cutting will begin "close to the 
Overman line, which will serve to open both of the properties in this 
quarter. There is no doubt that some ore will he found, as rich bunches 
exist all through this ground. Thatit will amount to much is another 
question, but the feature of speculation ought to make the shares active 
(luring the operation. As might be expected, ore was struck in the 
up-raise from 500 level of frown Point, at a bight of over 50 feet. Of 
course, if a ledge is met with on the 400, an up-raise from below is 
bound to strike it at some point. Some ore is also said to have been 
met with in Belcher near the line between these properties, which 
accounts for the rise in prices during the week. One or two other 
properties are only awaiting mills to start up crushing ore. The Just- 
ice has a large quantity extracted on the dumps, and Occidental is 
also prepared to furnish a ten stamp with a steady run. Little is 
heard ot the Alta faking game at present. The mill lies idle, as 
might be expected, and will rot before the Alta mine can keep it em- 
ployed on ore. The general belief is that the ore which has been run 
through it already really belonged to the Lady Washington. There 
are three ore bins—one for the Alta, another for Benton, and the 
Other for Lady Washington. Before the mill was finished Lady 
Washington was well filled and the Alta comparatively empty. It is 
well known that the former has some ore ana of a good quality, and 
the reputation of the clique does not guarantee their honesty in any 
matter where self interest is at stake. Furthermore, the determined 
attempt to assess the Washington has only been checked during the 
week by the fear that it might cause a split in the camp, as several of 
the retainers are loaded up with the stock and have been for some 
time. The stock is kept very quiet at present, in the hope that peo- 
ple will forget and forgive in the course of time, and so lay themselves 
open to further robbery. In the meanwhile the worthies connected 
therewith are amusing themselves selling Con. Virginia dividends 
short for the month, at which it is to be hoped they will break their 
necks. 

Every now and then a loud growl conies from a New York clique 
about the Tuscaroras. It does not affect any one here, and probably 
not there among those who know anything of the mines. The state- 
ment that any person has lost money in the leading properties is a flat 
lie. The mines nave sold repeatedly up to high figures; if they have 
declined a reaction has invariably taken place. There has been a 
greater opportunity to make big money here than in any other set of 
mines for years past. The leading stock itself, which is now selling 
for $8 and paying as heavy a dividend as the Bonanza mine itself, is 
held, principally Dy people who got it in the cents. The stocks are not 
purely speculative, they have merit as steady investments for many 
a day to come, and the growlers have only to hold their stocks to be 
reimbursed at the highest figures at which any of them have been 
sold. The top figures have not yet been touched in any of them. 
Of course there are wild cats here as elsewhere, but if readers of the 
News Letter stay with the mines named in this column they can 
meet with no loss. The mines along the veins running north and 
south, of which North Belle Isle is the center, are all stayers, and in 
the east and west ledge Grand Prize has entered a body of ore which 
may develop into a bonanza as big as the one which paid millions in 
dividends in years gone by. We simply use the conservative words 
of the management. The ore is there now, being extracted and 



milled, with pofousays running n high u |SBB per Ion. The extent 
body Is of course uoi rn, but even one posted on the 

sanation fa more than satUlivd with the outlook. The genera] im 
on out here among leading mining men la that this camp i- 
'!"■ ruture bonania district ol the west, and a Mcond Comstock, 
During the week tw ml have been incorporated 

und.T the name, oi North Commonwealth and Del Monte A it,, 

name ol the tor r implies, they are exfe 

wealth mine, which has been I I tig ho promising for a -time 

Attention i» directed to a notice in this issue which sbareholdt 
Mic Commonwealth should read, and avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity offered k in the new companies. 

A party of mining engineer- arc now on their wav down to the 
Mulattos Mme. to again Inspe* t it for the pui . 
said to be working in the interests ol Lloyd. All we have to 
wis, that it la just so much time wasted trying to carry thi 
through under hi- auspices, it will n ndon, and we 

with a full knowledge of thefaots.su long as this gentleman Is con- 
nected with it. The taint of the I nion (Told is over it. Lloyd and 
Hamilton are the parties directly interested. The -ales fell tin 
originally in the showing which was made ol the exorbitant 00m mis- 
sions which were connected with this scheme, and the under cur- 
rent of bad faith which was apparent throughout. All the corners 
were to be jumped and the most \ itul issues Ignored, irrespective of 
consequences in the hereafter to the unfortunate investors. To make 

a commission and -bake the .scheme was the jole purpos,. of the 
vendors, who had the audacity \<< bring forward a report of an -wperr 
like C. A. Ha mil ton. of the I nion Gold fiasco. It only wants Grant 
in now to make the trio Complete. The only wonder is that Mr. 
Loaiza, who is suppos